"Brace Yourself"?

"Brace Yourself"?

Author
Discussion

S0updr4g0n

138 posts

71 months

Wednesday 25th March
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Howaboutthis said:
So, say you were a passenger or driver in a car that was going to crash, how best to brace yourself? Feet against the firewall or tucked back, hands and arms against your chest maybe? Of course, in Oz there is the "Crikey Bar" on the passenger dashboard. Anyway, just wondering. Not long ago I was a passenger in a left hand drive vintage car with no seatbelt or head restraint, so I just held on with my buttocks.
Open door, exit and parachute roll. If possible end up in a pressup position.

Pickled Piper

6,176 posts

195 months

Tuesday 31st March
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Sit back into your seat, head against the headrest and let your seatbelt and airbag do the job they were designed to. Hands on thighs. Remove your glasses if you have time and put them somewhere easily retrievable post crash. Close your mouth and clench your teeth.

Bweber

18 posts

21 months

Monday 21st September
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Research on aircraft crashes (especially from the crash of the M1 near Kenworth), loose limbs are the big danger in high impact events. They must be kept as close to the torso as possible. Passengers who do so have much higher survival rates and lower injury. So let go of the wheel and get your feet away from the pedals.

Haltamer

1,525 posts

40 months

Monday 21st September
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For the driver at least, in a modern car tested to Euro NCAP standards, Sitting in driving position is surely the best bet?

Gives you something to hold onto; Protection is "Calibrated" for that position, and you can try for grim death to regain control until the last moments.

Having gone sideways into Armco at ~40, I was surprised by how comfortable the side airbag was - Didn't really "feel" the impact, It was like jumping onto a sofa - I'd do it again if it wasn't so fiscally damaging.

Fatball

561 posts

19 months

Tuesday 22nd September
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Id suggest that you take whatever position you like, it’s pure luck that nothing comes through the window/vehicle and takes you out. Or you can’t get out and the vehicle is on fire etc....

If it’s a lower speed bump then why bother, the seatbelt and airbags if they go off will protect you.

J__Wood

5 posts

21 months

Friday 25th September
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Rotary Potato said:
My thought process through this was:

"He's brave, kicking the back end out at that sort of speed"
"S**t! That's not deliberate"
"We're going to crash - there's a junction up ahead"
"There's a lot of exposed metal in here"
I pulled my legs up to my chest (i.e. front of thigh to chest, feet on thigh support of seat - by my bum), wrapped my arms round my legs, and pushed my head between my knees.
Funny how time appears to slow down in an incident and gives you tons of time to think, all after it is too late - I was out with a friend in pre-race test/practice after he'd rebuilt his racing kneeler (sidecar).
I'd never been a passenger but had watched him at the Isle of Man TT so clearly I was well qualified. Also being the early 80s the best place to test such a monster was on the streets of a city West of London, very early one Sunday morning, plus those dual carriageways and roundabouts were made for the job.
Yes those bloody roundabouts, after constantly moving my body/ballast around to provide traction or counterweight, the 10th roundabout was a quick 90 followed by massive acceleration and my weedy arms gave out. I was sliding feet first, dead straight down the road, luckily not even getting sexually assaulted by the cats eyes, with enough time to roll from my back to one side and then the other side as the heat built up through my leathers.
In fact whilst slowing (I'd stab at 120-140 from my own motorcycle a CBX1000 experience) I planned my story for the pointy heads, scoped out a new RS1600i in a garage and I'm fairly sure I would have had time to write war and peace.

Pica-Pica

7,670 posts

44 months

Friday 25th September
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J__Wood said:
Funny how time appears to slow down in an incident and gives you tons of time to think, all after it is too late -
Time, of course, does not slow down, the brain intensely focuses on avoiding harm, and shuts out extraneous thought.

Zarco

13,548 posts

169 months

Friday 25th September
quotequote all
J__Wood said:
Funny how time appears to slow down in an incident and gives you tons of time to think, all after it is too late - I was out with a friend in pre-race test/practice after he'd rebuilt his racing kneeler (sidecar).
I'd never been a passenger but had watched him at the Isle of Man TT so clearly I was well qualified. Also being the early 80s the best place to test such a monster was on the streets of a city West of London, very early one Sunday morning, plus those dual carriageways and roundabouts were made for the job.
Yes those bloody roundabouts, after constantly moving my body/ballast around to provide traction or counterweight, the 10th roundabout was a quick 90 followed by massive acceleration and my weedy arms gave out. I was sliding feet first, dead straight down the road, luckily not even getting sexually assaulted by the cats eyes, with enough time to roll from my back to one side and then the other side as the heat built up through my leathers.
In fact whilst slowing (I'd stab at 120-140 from my own motorcycle a CBX1000 experience) I planned my story for the pointy heads, scoped out a new RS1600i in a garage and I'm fairly sure I would have had time to write war and peace.
Love it biggrin

Glad you got away without injury too.

Drumroll

2,434 posts

80 months

Friday 25th September
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It is reckoned one of the reason children do well (by comparison) in accidents is because they don't brace themselves (no concept of the danger) So I would try not to brace myself.

Tommie38

361 posts

154 months

Monday 28th September
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When I plan for accidents in advance I will typically do the following:
- Double check I have valid insurance
- Let the wife know I might be home late
- Fit an FIA approved roll cage.

Advance planning is key.

waremark

2,711 posts

173 months

Monday 28th September
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Tommie38 said:
When I plan for accidents in advance I will typically do the following:
- Double check I have valid insurance
- Let the wife know I might be home late
- Fit an FIA approved roll cage.

Advance planning is key.
Harness, helmet and HANS?

waremark

2,711 posts

173 months

Monday 28th September
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waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.

Drumroll

2,434 posts

80 months

Monday 28th September
quotequote all
waremark said:
waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.
I would disagree, most protection of a car is designed for a head on accident.

Roofless Toothless

3,075 posts

92 months

Thursday 1st October
quotequote all
As most cars seem to have airbags these days, I would suggest removing the pipe from your mouth.

Flibble

5,433 posts

141 months

Thursday 8th October
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Drumroll said:
waremark said:
waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.
I would disagree, most protection of a car is designed for a head on accident.
I would agree with this - head on into an obstacle is going to be much better for the driver than a side impact.

Related, I've only set off the airbags once, in a front impact, and unlike the poster above who said their side impact airbag was soft, it was not. It was like being punched hard square in the bridge of the nose, I had a bruise for some time. Luckily I was wearing contacts, so didn't get my glasses smashed into my cheeks.

waremark

2,711 posts

173 months

Thursday 8th October
quotequote all
Flibble said:
Drumroll said:
waremark said:
waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.
I would disagree, most protection of a car is designed for a head on accident.
I would agree with this - head on into an obstacle is going to be much better for the driver than a side impact.

Related, I've only set off the airbags once, in a front impact, and unlike the poster above who said their side impact airbag was soft, it was not. It was like being punched hard square in the bridge of the nose, I had a bruise for some time. Luckily I was wearing contacts, so didn't get my glasses smashed into my cheeks.
Depending on the speed of impact, anything which stops you dead is to be avoided. The human body is not designed to stop dead, and therefore the combination of seatbelts and air bags is designed to cushion the impact slightly - but it can only do so much. If there is any direction in which the car will be able to continue moving for example after hitting a crash barrier or a glancing blow against another vehicle you have a much better chance of surviving. Look at the extraordinary accidents from which racing drivers walk away.

Drumroll

2,434 posts

80 months

Thursday 8th October
quotequote all
Flibble said:
Drumroll said:
waremark said:
waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.
I would disagree, most protection of a car is designed for a head on accident.
I would agree with this - head on into an obstacle is going to be much better for the driver than a side impact.

Related, I've only set off the airbags once, in a front impact, and unlike the poster above who said their side impact airbag was soft, it was not. It was like being punched hard square in the bridge of the nose, I had a bruise for some time. Luckily I was wearing contacts, so didn't get my glasses smashed into my cheeks.
Different airbags are designed to work differently. Curtain airbags are primarily designed to stop parts of your body going out of the car.

Flibble

5,433 posts

141 months

Thursday 8th October
quotequote all
I walked away with only bruising from the airbag and seat belt, so job done there I guess. Car was a right mess.

Pica-Pica

7,670 posts

44 months

Thursday 8th October
quotequote all
Flibble said:
I walked away with only bruising from the airbag and seat belt, so job done there I guess. Car was a right mess.
.. and the car’s crumple zones did the job too. Either the car becomes the write-off, or you do.

donkmeister

3,031 posts

60 months

Sunday 11th October
quotequote all
Drumroll said:
waremark said:
waremark said:
Harness, helmet and HANS?
A more serious observation is if you have any control at all over the car don't give up on looking for the least damaging thing to hit - if at all possible avoid head ons, trees or telegraph posts. That could make much more difference than what you do at the moment of impact.
I would disagree, most protection of a car is designed for a head on accident.
I read his point as smashing through a shrubbery would be preferable to smashing through a telegraph pole or a Range Rover.
Not "try and skid a bit more or a bit less so you get T-boned instead of having a head-on".