Straight-lining roundabouts

Straight-lining roundabouts

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Discussion

underwhelmist

Original Poster:

1,360 posts

101 months

Monday 12th April
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A discussion has broken out on the "Your biggest fear about driving" thread on straight-lining roundabouts.

On a motorbike, having made good observations and ensured that you're not going to inconvenience anybody or put yourself in harm's way, I think it's OK. Keeps the bike more upright, possibly avoids the area where there might be diesel spills, less dramatic changes of direction etc. Others think it's the sign of a lazy driver.

What's the view of the advanced driving contingent on here?

outnumbered

3,050 posts

201 months

Monday 12th April
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Definitely fine, in context. For example, taking the inner lane could give drivers entering the roundabout more opportunity to see you. There's a motorway junction near here where that's definitely the case.

johnao

589 posts

210 months

Monday 12th April
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underwhelmist said:
A discussion has broken out on the "Your biggest fear about driving" thread on straight-lining roundabouts.

On a motorbike, having made good observations and ensured that you're not going to inconvenience anybody or put yourself in harm's way, I think it's OK. Keeps the bike more upright, possibly avoids the area where there might be diesel spills, less dramatic changes of direction etc. Others think it's the sign of a lazy driver.

What's the view of the advanced driving contingent on here?
If you straight-line in the way you describe then it would be considered advanced driving/riding. It’s also ok to straight-line a roundabout in a car if safe to do so. I would normally straight-line only when no other road user was in the close vicinity.

Automatically deviating to the left, without thinking too much about it and because “that’s what we were taught to do when learning to drive”, could be considered lazy driving!

jimPH

2,353 posts

47 months

underwhelmist

Original Poster:

1,360 posts

101 months

Monday 12th April
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jimPH said:
biggrin

I wouldn't go to that extreme!

R0G

4,889 posts

122 months

Tuesday 13th April
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I straightline but only if safe to do so and does not encourage others behind me to do the same as they might not have considered the same things I have

_Hoppers

651 posts

32 months

Tuesday 13th April
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When I was a bike tutor for RoSPA, both examiners in the group who were also ex traffic both had their views on this. One said it was ok, the other not! Hope this helps laugh

Dixy

2,126 posts

172 months

Tuesday 13th April
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There is no black and white when it comes to driving.

Strudul

1,508 posts

52 months

Tuesday 13th April
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I do it every time it won't impede someone else.

Hate other people that do it though as they always obliviously cut me up.

RazerSauber

1,122 posts

27 months

Tuesday 13th April
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I would do it but only on a well sighted roundabout after the obvious checks. I'd still reduce speed too. Seen too many people assume it's clear then panic when they're past the point of no return when a car comes around the roundabout.

Don Roque

17,290 posts

126 months

Tuesday 13th April
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_Hoppers said:
When I was a bike tutor for RoSPA, both examiners in the group who were also ex traffic both had their views on this. One said it was ok, the other not! Hope this helps laugh
Current Roadcraft teaching is that it's the correct technique where it's safe and most expedient to do so. Much like using all the road, it is approved and encouraged where safe.

stogbandard

127 posts

17 months

Tuesday 13th April
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Strudul said:
I do it every time it won't impede someone else.

Hate other people that do it though as they always obliviously cut me up.
This! I also blame more recent roundabout designs that have more awkward entry angles that points the left lane in a tangential trajectory towards the inside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/Pew5fB8qbr8DDBbx5

Rather than this where the angle points the left lane in a tangential trajectory to the outside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/RGJQTv1qQXHff1nf8

Negotiating the latter “properly” feels more natural.

HocusPocus

463 posts

68 months

Tuesday 13th April
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Don Roque said:
_Hoppers said:
When I was a bike tutor for RoSPA, both examiners in the group who were also ex traffic both had their views on this. One said it was ok, the other not! Hope this helps laugh
Current Roadcraft teaching is that it's the correct technique where it's safe and most expedient to do so. Much like using all the road, it is approved and encouraged where safe.
Also when in Toad mode ;-)

Don Roque

17,290 posts

126 months

Wednesday 14th April
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stogbandard said:
This! I also blame more recent roundabout designs that have more awkward entry angles that points the left lane in a tangential trajectory towards the inside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/Pew5fB8qbr8DDBbx5

Rather than this where the angle points the left lane in a tangential trajectory to the outside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/RGJQTv1qQXHff1nf8

Negotiating the latter “properly” feels more natural.
More modern designs are intended to slow drivers on approach even if the roundabout is empty. You get those acute angles created by islands, foliage and other rubbish intended to block your view an approach so you have to slow down and check behind it etc.

col711

11 posts

16 months

Wednesday 14th April
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stogbandard said:
Strudul said:
I do it every time it won't impede someone else.

Hate other people that do it though as they always obliviously cut me up.
This! I also blame more recent roundabout designs that have more awkward entry angles that points the left lane in a tangential trajectory towards the inside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/Pew5fB8qbr8DDBbx5

Rather than this where the angle points the left lane in a tangential trajectory to the outside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/RGJQTv1qQXHff1nf8

Negotiating the latter “properly” feels more natural.
The second roundabout you refer to is a poor design on the northbound approach. This is because there is no entry deflection which is used at roundabouts to reduce the speed of traffic entering the roundabout. Although it didn't stop the van driver from taking off!

The first roundabout entries are not too bad but I would say that some of the road markings would tend to send drivers close to the central island.

slipknotted

104 posts

4 months

Thursday 15th April
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I think I agree with most people on this thread; fine when there's not another car in sight but otherwise just lazy and dangerous.

I've learned first hand why cutting roundabouts should only be done when you're absolutely sure there's not another car nearby: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7kxfaH4nUg&ab...

waremark

2,911 posts

180 months

Thursday 15th April
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slipknotted said:
I think I agree with most people on this thread; fine when there's not another car in sight but otherwise just lazy and dangerous.

I've learned first hand why cutting roundabouts should only be done when you're absolutely sure there's not another car nearby: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7kxfaH4nUg&ab...
I think there is a completely different message to take from that clip (where the camera car goes to the right of a car just ahead, which proceeds to straightline the roundabout, clipping the camera car). That is - don't position on a roundabout alongside another vehicle, or at least always make sure you will be able to get out of the way if another vehicle fails to maintain lane discipline.

The fact that one elderly gent straightlined without adequate observations is not a reason for not doing it. As you say, do it only when you are absolutely sure - not that there is no other car nearby, but that you will not adversely affect any other vehicle.

stogbandard

127 posts

17 months

Thursday 15th April
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col711 said:
stogbandard said:
Strudul said:
I do it every time it won't impede someone else.

Hate other people that do it though as they always obliviously cut me up.
This! I also blame more recent roundabout designs that have more awkward entry angles that points the left lane in a tangential trajectory towards the inside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/Pew5fB8qbr8DDBbx5

Rather than this where the angle points the left lane in a tangential trajectory to the outside of the roundabout:
https://goo.gl/maps/RGJQTv1qQXHff1nf8

Negotiating the latter “properly” feels more natural.
The second roundabout you refer to is a poor design on the northbound approach. This is because there is no entry deflection which is used at roundabouts to reduce the speed of traffic entering the roundabout. Although it didn't stop the van driver from taking off!

The first roundabout entries are not too bad but I would say that some of the road markings would tend to send drivers close to the central island.
I found this which explains my issue in a much better way: https://www.ltrc.lsu.edu/ltc_13/pdf/presentations/...

YorkshireWhisky

141 posts

109 months

Thursday 15th April
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I straight line everything if (and only if) the road is clear and no other people are anywhere (cars, bikes, horses, people) near me. The biggest risk is unseen side junctions or bikes at high speeds. My principal is that I pay road tax for both sides so I may as well use all the available road. Roundabouts are just 'wiggly' corners with whitle lines painted on them, enter left, clip internal apex, exit left makes a straight line in most cases and saves braking or slowing down so it must be better for the environment.
Might be a rally driving thing but I go from A to B in a straight line where possible. Other people may have a different opinion.

Ron240

1,081 posts

86 months

Tuesday 20th April
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Totally fine when safe to do so.
Anybody who says otherwise does not understand the absolutely critical "when safe to do so" part.
People always like to disagree with others because it is human nature, and the subject of driving is one that causes a lot of disagreements. laugh
Drivers who routinely follow the curvature of a roundabout are often doing so out of habit and not using proper observation and judgement.
The perfect example of this is a small island roundabout with only one unmarked lane - the driver I mentioned above will exaggerate the manouevre by turning the wheel hard left then right then left again when following the road ahead. Completely unnecessary of course...but if it makes them happy. smile




Edited by Ron240 on Tuesday 20th April 11:38