Learning in a Ferrari

Learning in a Ferrari

Author
Discussion

controlz

Original Poster:

186 posts

85 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
I used to kart a little as a child but that was a long time ago. I’m quite keen to get onto a race track again and start learning (you only live once right?). Other than my daily car, I have a new Ferrari F8 Tributo. Should I consider taking this on track and learning in it, or would I be far better off purchasing a much cheaper, slower car for the track that I don’t worry about scratching or throwing about? I imagine I’d be quite nervous in the F8. If so, I would appreciate some suggestions. Many thanks.

rodericb

3,236 posts

93 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
F8 should be fine if you take it slowly and gradually, I would have thought... You should get an instructor as a go kart on a go track is a fairly different proposition to an F8 on a car circuit!

1781cc

383 posts

61 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
I can see the concern, but on the flip that car has been made for driving. I’d do an MSV trackday at Bedford and book instruction. It’s probably the safest circuit in terms of run off, fast, can be technical to get it properly hooked up and it’s well run with garages available.

I see a lot of high end machinery there, like GT3s, Mclarens, R8s all playing safely.

Kawasicki

9,585 posts

202 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
I wouldn’t. I‘d learn in something slower & cheaper, that I would be less nervous about.

Stuart70

2,501 posts

150 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
Get a Caterham.

VelvetGreen

37 posts

33 months

Sunday 23rd May
quotequote all
If you have the money for a F8 Tributo, you probably have the money for a car which is far more appropriate for the track and will teach you far more about the art of driving at the limit - which is what track driving is all about.

The F8 has a limit, but very few people are able or would dare to find it, given that it is not engineered to be driven at it constantly like a specialised track car. It is chock full of electronic gadgetry designed to interfere with the car's behaviour at the limit to keep it safe on roads. On a track, it has neither the mechanical or aerodynamic grip relative to its weight to really do justice to the engine. It is a mighty fine car - a wonderful thing - but it is not a track car. The components are expensive, and if you crash it or dink it, the repairs will be eye-wateringly expensive. It is not designed for setup changes at trackside, or to give you the raw sensations of a racing car. It's just not quite right for tracks. Does it have a four point harness? Appropriate seats? Tyres? An interior that can take a helmet knock? Is the steering direct enough? etc.

Buy something like a Caterham (track spec) and some proper timing equipment, a race helmet, suit, all that stuff. Use that as your track car and adrenaline machine. It is lighter, simpler, more fuel efficient and less complex. The components can be tweaked easily and are inexpensive. It can be pushed to a safe, predictable limit and used as a learning tool. There is no electronic gadgetry interfering with what the tyres or brakes are doing. Take it out with an instructor and you will learn so, so much more about how to drive on track and how to really hustle a racing car.

Caterhams come in all sorts of flavours - I'd say a Seven 360 or 420 in R-spec (i.e. track spec) would be enough, probably with an h-shift manual or if you like, a sequential box. The 620R, which I've had the pleasure to drive, would be an absolute hoot on slicks.

Of course there are other options - M3s, MX5s, Porsches - but find something analogue and tractable which allows you to hone your instincts.

Keep up the karting too - it's really brilliant for honing your skills and your physical endurance!




bigothunter

1,384 posts

27 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Kawasicki said:
I wouldn’t. I‘d learn in something slower & cheaper, that I would be less nervous about.
yes

You don’t learn to swim by jumping in the deep end and hoping for the best.

Dave Hedgehog

13,483 posts

171 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
bigothunter said:
Kawasicki said:
I wouldn’t. I‘d learn in something slower & cheaper, that I would be less nervous about.
yes

You don’t learn to swim by jumping in the deep end and hoping for the best.
thats exactly how i learnt, the old man just chucked me in and let me get on with it

VelvetGreen

37 posts

33 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Dave Hedgehog said:
thats exactly how i learnt, the old man just chucked me in and let me get on with it
…in a Ferrari?

Dave Hedgehog

13,483 posts

171 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
VelvetGreen said:
Dave Hedgehog said:
thats exactly how i learnt, the old man just chucked me in and let me get on with it
…in a Ferrari?
yeah, but it was a mondial so nobody cared

Munter

30,682 posts

208 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
I'd say hire something RWD for a day. E.g. https://www.track-group.com/product-category/track... (Other rental providers exist)

Then decide.

VelvetGreen

37 posts

33 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Dave Hedgehog said:
yeah, but it was a mondial so nobody cared
Ah, makes more sense. Sounds fun tho!

bigothunter

1,384 posts

27 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
controlz said:
Other than my daily car, I have a new Ferrari F8 Tributo.
Most supercar drivers at track days get hammered by mundane saloons. If you can stand the humiliation, take the Ferrari. If not, learn in something humble.

Mo28

796 posts

67 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Clio 182 is what you need

bigothunter

1,384 posts

27 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Mo28 said:
Clio 182 is what you need
But it's FWD frown Doesn't help learning of RWD techniques appropriate to the Ferrari.

Munter

30,682 posts

208 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
bigothunter said:
Mo28 said:
Clio 182 is what you need
But it's FWD frown Doesn't help learning of RWD techniques appropriate to the Ferrari.
That's why I think a day in a rented Elise might be a good idea. Doesn't risk a prang in the Ferrari, but is driving something mid-engine and RWD. Then they can satisfy themselves that they have enough skills to safely take the Ferrari on track and do it justice / or the opposite.

I wonder what trackday insurance costs for an F8 scratchchin

Stuart70

2,501 posts

150 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
And again - get a Caterham.

bigothunter

1,384 posts

27 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
Stuart70 said:
And again - get a Caterham.
And join the merry throng of Caterhams at track days? scratchchin

Stuart70

2,501 posts

150 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
bigothunter said:
Stuart70 said:
And again - get a Caterham.
And join the merry throng of Caterhams at track days? scratchchin
Absolutely - they are ubiquitous for a reason.

gruffalo

6,660 posts

193 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
The biggest grin I ever saw on a trackday was on the face of a bloke who had just gotten out of a 2CV on a trackday at Brands Hatch, he was having a ball.

You don't have to be fast to enjoy yourself, just enjoy getting the best out of what ever you are driving.