HMS Queen Elizabeth

HMS Queen Elizabeth

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Discussion

junglie

1,649 posts

181 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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Seight_Returns said:
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
That might have been the case in the early years but ‘like a glove’ now!

Speculatore

1,998 posts

199 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
Seight_Returns said:
Evanivitch said:
Type 26 will take Merlin
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
It was only on the first few hulls if not only the first one, Iron Duke. The builders completed the flight deck, including all of the special paint and deck landing markings and lights when the company installing the pully tracks turned up to install them. This was a system that allowed the helicopter to be pulled inside the hanger using a fixed winch system.
The company installed the track and pulley system on top of the finished flight deck so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". This now meant that the rotor head on the Merlin would have clipped the top of the hanger opening so air was taken from the tyres lowering the helicopter just enough for it to fit in.

normalbloke

4,504 posts

183 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
I noted she was turned again this morning, always fun to watch. Is this to prevent bed sores?

Evanivitch

8,631 posts

86 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
normalbloke said:
I noted she was turned again this morning, always fun to watch. Is this to prevent bed sores?
Can't have the moss only growing on one side wink

Ayahuasca

26,409 posts

243 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
Speculatore said:
Seight_Returns said:
Evanivitch said:
Type 26 will take Merlin
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
It was only on the first few hulls if not only the first one, Iron Duke. The builders completed the flight deck, including all of the special paint and deck landing markings and lights when the company installing the pully tracks turned up to install them. This was a system that allowed the helicopter to be pulled inside the hanger using a fixed winch system.
The company installed the track and pulley system on top of the finished flight deck so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". This now meant that the rotor head on the Merlin would have clipped the top of the hanger opening so air was taken from the tyres lowering the helicopter just enough for it to fit in.
I have been in the hangar of the Iron Duke. I can confirm that the tables for canapés and cocktails fitted perfectly.

hidetheelephants

16,929 posts

157 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
Speculatore said:
Seight_Returns said:
Evanivitch said:
Type 26 will take Merlin
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
It was only on the first few hulls if not only the first one, Iron Duke. The builders completed the flight deck, including all of the special paint and deck landing markings and lights when the company installing the pully tracks turned up to install them. This was a system that allowed the helicopter to be pulled inside the hanger using a fixed winch system.
The company installed the track and pulley system on top of the finished flight deck so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". This now meant that the rotor head on the Merlin would have clipped the top of the hanger opening so air was taken from the tyres lowering the helicopter just enough for it to fit in.
This is why shipyards need to be supervised very closely by overseers who know what's what; see also Nicola's Follies, AKA hulls 801 and 802 at Fergusons for examples of shipbuilding being supervised poorly or not at all.

RizzoTheRat

20,478 posts

156 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
And the classic of welding a section of a submarine (Trafalgar class?) in the wrong way round.

Seight_Returns

1,431 posts

165 months

Wednesday 3rd February
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RizzoTheRat said:
And the classic of welding a section of a submarine (Trafalgar class?) in the wrong way round.
Yes - Triumph apparently.

Although to be fair - I invariably do the same when I buy anything from Ikea.

andy97

4,144 posts

186 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
Ayahuasca said:
I have been in the hangar of the Iron Duke. I can confirm that the tables for canapés and cocktails fitted perfectly.
Defence diplomacy at its best

Teddy Lop

4,651 posts

31 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
junglie said:
Seight_Returns said:
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
That might have been the case in the early years but ‘like a glove’ now!
is that navyspeak for you've clouted it so many times you've worn a grove now?

hidetheelephants

16,929 posts

157 months

Wednesday 3rd February
quotequote all
Teddy Lop said:
junglie said:
Seight_Returns said:
Apologies for the random off topic question - but since we've got people here who've actually been there and done that - someone once told me that the only way to get a Merlin into the hanger of a Type 23 was to let the tyres down so it would fit through the hanger door. Any truth in that ?
That might have been the case in the early years but ‘like a glove’ now!
is that navyspeak for you've clouted it so many times you've worn a grove now?
99% of the time 23s deployed with a Lynx, so the question probably did not arise operationally.

Cold

10,772 posts

54 months

Friday 26th February
quotequote all
HMS QNLZ is due to leave port on Monday (1st March) for a shakedown voyage.
Estimated time for cast off is at 1PM.
Get your government sanctioned daily exercise along the seafront at lunchtime and bring your binoculars.

(Remember, Gunwharf Quays is still closed for visitors and this includes the car park. Flood defence work means the footpath between the Square Tower/Battery Wall and Clarence Pier is also shut)

Wildcat45

7,539 posts

153 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
Speculatore said:
It was only on the first few hulls if not only the first one, Iron Duke. The builders completed the flight deck, including all of the special paint and deck landing markings and lights when the company installing the pully tracks turned up to install them. This was a system that allowed the helicopter to be pulled inside the hanger using a fixed winch system.
The company installed the track and pulley system on top of the finished flight deck so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". This now meant that the rotor head on the Merlin would have clipped the top of the hanger opening so air was taken from the tyres lowering the helicopter just enough for it to fit in.
Have I mis-remrmbered this? I went aboard an early 23 and there was wooden planking covering part of the flight deck. If may have been a ship in-built or just delivered .

Wildcat45

7,539 posts

153 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
andy97 said:
Ayahuasca said:
I have been in the hangar of the Iron Duke. I can confirm that the tables for canapés and cocktails fitted perfectly.
Defence diplomacy at its best
It's not Cockers P it's a Capability Demonstration. :-)

Phud

1,054 posts

107 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
Wildcat45 said:
It's not Cockers P it's a Capability Demonstration. :-)
cock and arse was only the precursor

Speculatore

1,998 posts

199 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
Wildcat45 said:
Speculatore said:
It was only on the first few hulls if not only the first one, Iron Duke. The builders completed the flight deck, including all of the special paint and deck landing markings and lights when the company installing the pully tracks turned up to install them. This was a system that allowed the helicopter to be pulled inside the hanger using a fixed winch system.
The company installed the track and pulley system on top of the finished flight deck so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". This now meant that the rotor head on the Merlin would have clipped the top of the hanger opening so air was taken from the tyres lowering the helicopter just enough for it to fit in.
Have I mis-remrmbered this? I went aboard an early 23 and there was wooden planking covering part of the flight deck. If may have been a ship in-built or just delivered .
You are correct which is why I stated above "so a new flight deck was installed on top of the original one effectively raising is around 4". I should have included that the new flight deck was in fact a wooden one.

Talksteer

3,567 posts

197 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
stevesingo said:
TTmonkey said:
I’m not sure it matters. What conflict are we likely to see where we put these carriers into the harms way of an opponent that has the capacity to launch a significant threat against them? It’s probably only Iran that would be of a mindset to attack such a target, and we wouldn’t be out there alone in any conflict.


Can anyone see a conflict where the U.K. stands alone against a player serious enough to attack the carriers with technology advanced enough to be a threat? We will always be under US EAW cover because we will always be part of a coalition.
The main idea is UK aircraft carriers demonstrate the ability to force project around the world as part of UK PLC's global influence strategy. To most nations that holds up well as you quite rightly pointed out, there are not many nations who cold pose a credible threat to such vessels. It all falls down when you consider the UK's geopolitical competitors know it would be an absolute miracle if the UK could force project any meaningful force on the surface of the sea and therefore just a folly if not done correctly.

Force projecting maritime based air power is not about on ship and a handful of aircraft. If the Gov wanted the capability to do such a thing, they needed to look at what that really meant.
I'd make the argument that we achieved conventional weapons MAD some time in the last 20 years.

With cruise missiles and increasing terminally guided ballistic missiles countries have the ability to massively damage each other's economies in an afternoon. Country's capable of fighting advanced warfare also generally have comfortable populations who like, electricity, heating, the internet and consumer goods.

Provided that your country has this capability or you are allied with somebody who does you are essentially proof from serious military action against you. I expect that most military action going forwards will be more like what happened in Crimea which is just below the military horizon.

Evanivitch

8,631 posts

86 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
Talksteer said:
With cruise missiles and increasing terminally guided ballistic missiles countries have the ability to massively damage each other's economies in an afternoon.
Who's using conventional terminally-adjusted ballistic missiles?

RizzoTheRat

20,478 posts

156 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
Evanivitch said:
Who's using conventional terminally-adjusted ballistic missiles?
Luckily nobody's actually using them, but the Chinese have a terminally guided ant ship ballistic missile (DF-21D). The Russians are developing hypersonic gliders which are basically guided ballistic missile.

Evanivitch

8,631 posts

86 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
RizzoTheRat said:
Evanivitch said:
Who's using conventional terminally-adjusted ballistic missiles?
Luckily nobody's actually using them, but the Chinese have a terminally guided ant ship ballistic missile (DF-21D). The Russians are developing hypersonic gliders which are basically guided ballistic missile.
Ah the Daily Fails favourite missile. So fast and so long range it doesn't know where its target is and doesn't have enough time to adjust in the final stage.

We shouldn't base our defence procurement policy on Chinese propaganda.