Would you fly on a 737 Max?

Would you fly on a 737 Max?

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Discussion

Piginapoke

Original Poster:

1,813 posts

149 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
If Boeing succeeds in certifying the 737 Max to resume flying, would you be happy to fly on one?

The company has 500 airframes made and 3000 on order; it seems to be assuming that all will be fine once US regulators give the green light. I'm not so sure I would fly on it though- any views?

Edited by Piginapoke on Monday 2nd November 07:42

Dr Jekyll

21,202 posts

225 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
I'd be happy to fly on it. Even without the fix, the problem would only occur in a particular set of circumstances which everyone remotely involved now knows about.


fesuvious

6,231 posts

205 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Watching thread with interest.
I'm not sure

Piginapoke

Original Poster:

1,813 posts

149 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Dr Jekyll said:
I'd be happy to fly on it. Even without the fix, the problem would only occur in a particular set of circumstances which everyone remotely involved now knows about.
I think you might be in the minority with that! hehe

Gary29

3,264 posts

63 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
I would, and I hate flying.

As above, with all the issues surrounding this aircraft, you could only assume that they have everything sorted out 100%, another incident would be the final nail.

And if they hadn't sorted it, then I would have fianlly lost all faith in the human race anyway, and would be accepting of my fate.

Eric Mc

114,593 posts

229 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
No.

Teddy Lop

4,651 posts

31 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Dr Jekyll said:
I'd be happy to fly on it. Even without the fix, the problem would only occur in a particular set of circumstances which everyone remotely involved now knows about.
I'd be fairly comfortable there won't be any western pilots not familiar with the MCAS issue fixed or broken, but I do wonder what else may have been bodged.

Munter

30,450 posts

205 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Probably. Because by the time I knew what it was I'd just about be walking into it, and chances are wouldn't turn around and refuse to board.

Would I deliberately book a flight on one given an alternative? Not for say 5years after it's back in the air without significant incidents.

MB140

2,818 posts

67 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
While they may have fixed the MCAS issue what is more concerning to me (as someone who works in aviation for a living) is how in bed Boeing and the FAA have been with allowing Boeing to just sign stuff off as safe on there own authority with the FAA just giving it a rubber stamping without really understanding what there approving.

Worse still the FAA and EASA have a reciprocal agreement meaning anything the FAA approve is automatically approved by EASA although EASA have take a very close look at MCAS and I’m not so sure they will trust the FAA so implicitly from now on.

The next question is while they may have fixed MCAS what’s the next thing to cause a crash that they have just rubber stamped.

In short right now No thanks I’d rather fly in something else.

uncinqsix

3,155 posts

174 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
MB140 said:
While they may have fixed the MCAS issue what is more concerning to me (as someone who works in aviation for a living) is how in bed Boeing and the FAA have been with allowing Boeing to just sign stuff off as safe on there own authority with the FAA just giving it a rubber stamping without really understanding what there approving.

Worse still the FAA and EASA have a reciprocal agreement meaning anything the FAA approve is automatically approved by EASA although EASA have take a very close look at MCAS and I’m not so sure they will trust the FAA so implicitly from now on.

The next question is while they may have fixed MCAS what’s the next thing to cause a crash that they have just rubber stamped.

In short right now No thanks I’d rather fly in something else.
This. The issue isn't so much the MCAS problem, but the regulatory failure that made it possible. The "grandfathering" of the original 737 certification has been pushed too far, and at some point the FAA should have put its foot down.

craigjm

12,029 posts

164 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Munter said:
Probably. Because by the time I knew what it was I'd just about be walking into it, and chances are wouldn't turn around and refuse to board.

Would I deliberately book a flight on one given an alternative? Not for say 5years after it's back in the air without significant incidents.
This. You never know exactly what plane you are flying on until you are boarding and the vast majority of passengers would have no idea how to determine what it is either. It’s not like the model name is splashed down the side in the livery

aeropilot

23,747 posts

191 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
MB140 said:
In short right now No thanks I’d rather fly in something else.
Same here.

Although, I suspect its not something that I'm going to need to consider in the near future with the current situation.


MitchT

13,499 posts

173 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
craigjm said:
Munter said:
Probably. Because by the time I knew what it was I'd just about be walking into it, and chances are wouldn't turn around and refuse to board.

Would I deliberately book a flight on one given an alternative? Not for say 5years after it's back in the air without significant incidents.
This. You never know exactly what plane you are flying on until you are boarding and the vast majority of passengers would have no idea how to determine what it is either. It’s not like the model name is splashed down the side in the livery
You could look on FightRadar to see what's rocking up at your gate before you're past the point of no return!

craigjm

12,029 posts

164 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
MitchT said:
craigjm said:
Munter said:
Probably. Because by the time I knew what it was I'd just about be walking into it, and chances are wouldn't turn around and refuse to board.

Would I deliberately book a flight on one given an alternative? Not for say 5years after it's back in the air without significant incidents.
This. You never know exactly what plane you are flying on until you are boarding and the vast majority of passengers would have no idea how to determine what it is either. It’s not like the model name is splashed down the side in the livery
You could look on FightRadar to see what's rocking up at your gate before you're past the point of no return!
Is anyone really paranoid enough to do such things every time one flies?

aeropilot

23,747 posts

191 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
There's photo evidence that Ryanair have decided to help passengers not realise what they might be getting by removing all the large 737 Max logo's from the forward fuselages of their existing Max fleet during their grounding...whistle

Wonder if they will do the same on all the safety evac cars in the seat backs as well?


MB140

2,818 posts

67 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
aeropilot said:
There's photo evidence that Ryanair have decided to help passengers not realise what they might be getting by removing all the large 737 Max logo's from the forward fuselages of their existing Max fleet during their grounding...whistle

Wonder if they will do the same on all the safety evac cars in the seat backs as well?
Aren’t Ryanair rebranding it as the 737-8200 or something similar. Exact same aircraft as the 737 Max just different lettering on the side.

Jiebo

291 posts

60 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
If I had a choice between the 737 max and something else, I would always choose the something else.
If the 737 flight was much cheaper (25%+), I would reluctantly go with that instead.

It’s not fully rational, the risk is probably the same now as any other aircraft, but the damage is done, and trust is gone. The fact that most publications I’ve read say that there is inherently something wrong with the aircraft and has been cheaply designed will always put me off.

aeropilot

23,747 posts

191 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
MB140 said:
aeropilot said:
There's photo evidence that Ryanair have decided to help passengers not realise what they might be getting by removing all the large 737 Max logo's from the forward fuselages of their existing Max fleet during their grounding...whistle

Wonder if they will do the same on all the safety evac cars in the seat backs as well?
Aren’t Ryanair rebranding it as the 737-8200 or something similar. Exact same aircraft as the 737 Max just different lettering on the side.
At the moment they've just removed the 737 Max logos, and not put anything different back in place.



Eric Mc

114,593 posts

229 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
Time to swot up on your Boeing737 registrations lists.

rjfp1962

2,321 posts

37 months

Monday 2nd November 2020
quotequote all
No.. If Boeing feel the need to drop the word "Max" from the aircraft type - That says it all.....

A320 Neo for me..