Engine Fire over Denver

Engine Fire over Denver

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Scabutz

2,961 posts

45 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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El stovey said:
Scabutz said:
El stovey said:
Pilot Joe on YouTube makes a great video covering this also.

https://youtu.be/q5Wler87pwY
I like his videos, but why does he call himself Captain Joe when he only has 3 stripes?
hehe

He’s an F/O with his airline and in the videos he has a generic pilots uniform on. I guess it’s to do with linking his employer to his YouTube.

I think the captain thing is just his YouTube character.

This whole Instagram YouTube pilot thing is always tricky with using your job to add authority to your insight and get more views but your employer maybe not being happy about certain things.

Then there’s the whole taking photos or filming in the flightdeck thing also. Most of these guys are pretty careful not to link their employer to their social media.

Some female pilots particularly are making good money from social media and even get free stuff (watches sunglasses etc) to promote.
Fair enough. He's a likeable chap. There are some very nice female pilots on YT as well. DutchFlyingGirl for starters.

MartG

17,819 posts

169 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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Closeup of the fan - people are saying the one that failed at the root looks like a fatigue failure, while the damage to the second blade was due to debris from the first one hitting it


MarkwG

3,029 posts

154 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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JuniorD said:
@6.00 mins - a part of a fan blade was found in a soccer pitch in Bloomfield Connecticut ?

Wtf, that’s 1800 miles away!
I imagine he means Broomfield, Denver.

Brother D

2,969 posts

141 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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MartG said:
Closeup of the fan - people are saying the one that failed at the root looks like a fatigue failure, while the damage to the second blade was due to debris from the first one hitting it

How they make the fan blades is really interesting, although quite hard to find the finer details (process that allows them to inflate them etc), but there's a move to composite fan blades for the weight saving.

The HT blades are also pretty interesting crystal affairs and more like a sieve that a blade for cooling purposes (as operating in gas temps above their melting point).


red_slr

12,617 posts

154 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Max_Torque

16,579 posts

182 months

Wednesday 24th February
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MartG said:
Closeup of the fan - people are saying the one that failed at the root looks like a fatigue failure, while the damage to the second blade was due to debris from the first one hitting it

It's actually fairly interesting because it HASN'T actually failed at the root!



GliderRider

942 posts

46 months

Thursday 25th February
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red_slr said:
It was fascinating, well, to me anyway, to hear Juan Browne talking about the United 1175 incident, when he mentioned that issues usually occur at change of engine power.

In the early days of the B777, I was working on its ultrasonic fuel quantity indicating system, running a multitude of tests on a 'wet fuel' test rig, with full aircraft sets of fuel probes in fuel at different temperatures, fuel levels and angles. At the time there were several reported cases of pilots, just as they reached the top of the climb and adjusted the throttles for cruise, receiving a zero or low fuel warning. As can be imagined, the pilots found this rather disconcerting.

In addition to the full system rig, I ran tests on individual probes in fuel, simulating the air pressure change in the ullage (air space above the fuel) as the aircraft climbed, in case the issue was caused by dissolved air in the fuel, degassing out, thus providing a false surface from which the ultrasonic signal would reflect.

After months of testing, a probe was tested on a shaker, in a transparent fuel-filled cylinder. It was then determined that at certain changes in frequency, the flat plate brackets on the wing ribs, to which our probes mounted, would resonate, and a 'black hole' effect would occur in the fuel. The dissolved air in the fuel would be drawn to this void, causing it to grow in size, and by varying the frequency of vibration, it could actually be moved up and down in the fuel.
Evidently what was happening was that resonance started as the engine rpm dropped, shaking the fuel probe bracket. One of these voids would form, thus creating a false fuel surface in the fuel probe, which in turn caused the computer algorithm which determined the plane of the fuel surface and thus the volume of fuel beneath it, to fail.
As far as I am aware, the fix was something as simple as bending the edge of the flat plate bracket over to stop it resonating.



J4CKO

33,634 posts

165 months

Thursday 25th February
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MartG said:
Closeup of the fan - people are saying the one that failed at the root looks like a fatigue failure, while the damage to the second blade was due to debris from the first one hitting it

I have a mangled fan blade in the shed, always thought it would be amusing to take it and embed it a few inches into some grass near the airport biggrin

El stovey

38,354 posts

228 months

Thursday 4th March
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https://youtu.be/J7_lzeY23dI

Great interview with the captain here.

ETA - Sorry wrong incident but still B777 (UAL1175 and engine fan blade incident)






Edited by El stovey on Thursday 4th March 13:19

WyrleyD

1,347 posts

113 months

Thursday 4th March
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I actually watched that early this morning, I think Juan Browne is great for getting information out and I really like his style and how he gets to the root of the issue.

El stovey

38,354 posts

228 months

Thursday 4th March
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WyrleyD said:
I actually watched that early this morning, I think Juan Browne is great for getting information out and I really like his style and how he gets to the root of the issue.
Yeah it’s a great interview.

Technical enough but also accessible with a real human element.

Interesting that the EICAS froze due to wiring damage and the engine instruments were still showing normal. Making it difficult to diagnose the issue.

WyrleyD

1,347 posts

113 months

Thursday 4th March
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El stovey said:
WyrleyD said:
I actually watched that early this morning, I think Juan Browne is great for getting information out and I really like his style and how he gets to the root of the issue.
Yeah it’s a great interview.

Technical enough but also accessible with a real human element.

Interesting that the EICAS froze due to wiring damage and the engine instruments were still showing normal. Making it difficult to diagnose the issue.
Don't know but it could be something to do with the data refresh rate or repeated "request for data" to the broken transmitter in the engine but 30 secs seems an awful long time to decide there was no more data, I think there's room for some modification in that area if that's the case.

MartG

17,819 posts

169 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
WyrleyD said:
El stovey said:
WyrleyD said:
I actually watched that early this morning, I think Juan Browne is great for getting information out and I really like his style and how he gets to the root of the issue.
Yeah it’s a great interview.

Technical enough but also accessible with a real human element.

Interesting that the EICAS froze due to wiring damage and the engine instruments were still showing normal. Making it difficult to diagnose the issue.
Don't know but it could be something to do with the data refresh rate or repeated "request for data" to the broken transmitter in the engine but 30 secs seems an awful long time to decide there was no more data, I think there's room for some modification in that area if that's the case.
On an electronic display you'd think they could mark out-of-date/suspect data a different colour ?

eldar

16,302 posts

161 months

Thursday 4th March
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MartG said:
On an electronic display you'd think they could mark out-of-date/suspect data a different colour ?
Out of date vs out of spec in the same different colour could be even more confusing. End up needing several colours, even worse, potentially.

MartG

17,819 posts

169 months

Friday 5th March
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eldar said:
MartG said:
On an electronic display you'd think they could mark out-of-date/suspect data a different colour ?
Out of date vs out of spec in the same different colour could be even more confusing. End up needing several colours, even worse, potentially.
Out of spec red, suspect amber, good green ?

El stovey

38,354 posts

228 months

Friday 5th March
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On the 787 there were lots of early problems with failure indications showing too soon after things like power interruptions or transfers etc so the timing had to be increased.

The EICAS indications freezing like that on the 777 after an engine failure (or wiring failure) is far from ideal though.

Still though it’s a fairly unusual thing to happen but then I suppose it might just be one of the holes in the cheese.

Listening to the interview it was amazing how the departing blade hit the structure frame which stopped it piercing the fuselage skin just below a window.

Edited by El stovey on Friday 5th March 11:03

Mave

6,814 posts

180 months

Friday 5th March
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MartG said:
On an electronic display you'd think they could mark out-of-date/suspect data a different colour ?
Yep. I've worked on systems where the display value is colour coded, and the display border is also colour coded to tell you if the data is old.

Wozy68

5,154 posts

135 months

Friday 5th March
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El stovey said:
Listening to the interview it was amazing how the departing blade hit the structure frame which stopped it piercing the fuselage skin just below a window.

Edited by El stovey on Friday 5th March 11:03
Indeed. His '5 stars' he talks about, were that day very much in alinement.

Great pilot(s) and some good luck saved 381 people that day.