Post four lines of perfect lyrics from first verse

Post four lines of perfect lyrics from first verse

Author
Discussion

BigRusko

63 posts

39 months

Monday 24th December 2018
quotequote all
The Verve - The Drug Don't Work

All this talk of getting old
It's getting me down my love
Like a cat in a bag, waiting to drown
This time I'm comin' down

Absolutely spot on for me!

Raygun

2,733 posts

65 months

Tuesday 25th December 2018
quotequote all
I have a mansion
Forget the price
Ain't never been there
They tell me it's nice.

Johnspex

1,818 posts

129 months

Tuesday 25th December 2018
quotequote all
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
I read that, apparently he was concerned about the grammar of the line, but Glenn Frey and Don Henley, (of The Eagles), said that it was the greatest line in the song, he MUST leave it in.
I think that Bob Seger was one of the greatest songwriter/singers of the late seventies and the eighties.
I remember driving an American ex with her latest squeeze, another English guy, to JFK in the eighties, we’d all spent the night at another American mutual female friend’s Queens apartment, purely platonic on my part, and the new beau was returning to U.K., I’d been asked to take him to the airport.
As I drove along the Van Wyck Expressway, Bob Seger was on the radio, singing, “We’ve got tonight.”
As the line, “We’ve got tonight babe, why don’t you stay”, came on, I looked in the mirror, and she was looking at me from the rear seat, mouthing the words, and winking.
I didn’t need much persuading.
Jesus Christ, Frank 7 does it again! Was this the same one the Portugese soldiers wanted another look at?
No, but you were close, the one in Portugal was Myra, the one on the Van Wyck was Adrienne, they were exchange students at college together in U.K. if that helps.
I’m retired from all that game now unfortunately, but in my 20s, 30s, and 40s, there were two things that I was good at, and the other one was driving.
[/quote

I hope you don't think I was impressed, I was being as sarcastic as I could.

Frank7

3,447 posts

32 months

Tuesday 25th December 2018
quotequote all
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
I read that, apparently he was concerned about the grammar of the line, but Glenn Frey and Don Henley, (of The Eagles), said that it was the greatest line in the song, he MUST leave it in.
I think that Bob Seger was one of the greatest songwriter/singers of the late seventies and the eighties.
I remember driving an American ex with her latest squeeze, another English guy, to JFK in the eighties, we’d all spent the night at another American mutual female friend’s Queens apartment, purely platonic on my part, and the new beau was returning to U.K., I’d been asked to take him to the airport.
As I drove along the Van Wyck Expressway, Bob Seger was on the radio, singing, “We’ve got tonight.”
As the line, “We’ve got tonight babe, why don’t you stay”, came on, I looked in the mirror, and she was looking at me from the rear seat, mouthing the words, and winking.
I didn’t need much persuading.
Jesus Christ, Frank 7 does it again! Was this the same one the Portugese soldiers wanted another look at?
No, but you were close, the one in Portugal was Myra, the one on the Van Wyck was Adrienne, they were exchange students at college together in U.K. if that helps.
I’m retired from all that game now unfortunately, but in my 20s, 30s, and 40s, there were two things that I was good at, and the other one was driving.
[/quote

I hope you don't think I was impressed, I was being as sarcastic as I could.
I could care less whether you’re impressed or not, you asked a question, I answered it, end of story.
I was being as sardonic as I could there, there’s a subtle difference.

Mr Gearchange

5,845 posts

151 months

Tuesday 25th December 2018
quotequote all
Son, I'm 30
I only went with your mother 'cause she's dirty
And I don't have a decent bone in me
What you get is just what you see yeah

DickyC

33,910 posts

143 months

Tuesday 25th December 2018
quotequote all
At the risk of being expelled from the thread:

Cathy, I'm lost, I said though I knew she was sleeping
And I'm empty and aching and I don't know why
Counting the cars on the New Jersey Turnpike
They've all come to look for America

(It's not the first verse)

Johnspex

1,818 posts

129 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
I read that, apparently he was concerned about the grammar of the line, but Glenn Frey and Don Henley, (of The Eagles), said that it was the greatest line in the song, he MUST leave it in.
I think that Bob Seger was one of the greatest songwriter/singers of the late seventies and the eighties.
I remember driving an American ex with her latest squeeze, another English guy, to JFK in the eighties, we’d all spent the night at another American mutual female friend’s Queens apartment, purely platonic on my part, and the new beau was returning to U.K., I’d been asked to take him to the airport.
As I drove along the Van Wyck Expressway, Bob Seger was on the radio, singing, “We’ve got tonight.”
As the line, “We’ve got tonight babe, why don’t you stay”, came on, I looked in the mirror, and she was looking at me from the rear seat, mouthing the words, and winking.
I didn’t need much persuading.
Jesus Christ, Frank 7 does it again! Was this the same one the Portugese soldiers wanted another look at?
No, but you were close, the one in Portugal was Myra, the one on the Van Wyck was Adrienne, they were exchange students at college together in U.K. if that helps.
I’m retired from all that game now unfortunately, but in my 20s, 30s, and 40s, there were two things that I was good at, and the other one was driving.
[/quote

I hope you don't think I was impressed, I was being as sarcastic as I could.
I could care less whether you’re impressed or not, you asked a question, I answered it, end of story.
I was being as sardonic as I could there, there’s a subtle difference.
If you could care less you must care a bit. How much less could you care?

AW111

4,923 posts

78 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
US forces give the nod
It's a setback for your country
Bombs and trenches all in rows
Bombs and threats still ask for more

AW111

4,923 posts

78 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
Holding counsel with the king and queen
Trying hard to decide the fate of the regime
There's only one thing needed to complete the harmonising
That's the man with a voice like a scraping violin

kuro

1,137 posts

64 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
tdm34 said:
My uncle has a country place, that no-one knows about
He says it used to be a farm, before the Motor Law
Sundays I elude the ‘Eyes’, and hop the Turbine Freight
To far outside the Wire, where my white-haired uncle waits
That would be one of my choices. One of the best from Rush, based on a short story that appeared in road and track magazine in 1973. A vision of the future which is now bordering on reality.

https://youtu.be/PjjNvjURS-s

Frank7

3,447 posts

32 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
Johnspex said:
Frank7 said:
I read that, apparently he was concerned about the grammar of the line, but Glenn Frey and Don Henley, (of The Eagles), said that it was the greatest line in the song, he MUST leave it in.
I think that Bob Seger was one of the greatest songwriter/singers of the late seventies and the eighties.
I remember driving an American ex with her latest squeeze, another English guy, to JFK in the eighties, we’d all spent the night at another American mutual female friend’s Queens apartment, purely platonic on my part, and the new beau was returning to U.K., I’d been asked to take him to the airport.
As I drove along the Van Wyck Expressway, Bob Seger was on the radio, singing, “We’ve got tonight.”
As the line, “We’ve got tonight babe, why don’t you stay”, came on, I looked in the mirror, and she was looking at me from the rear seat, mouthing the words, and winking.
I didn’t need much persuading.
Jesus Christ, Frank 7 does it again! Was this the same one the Portugese soldiers wanted another look at?
No, but you were close, the one in Portugal was Myra, the one on the Van Wyck was Adrienne, they were exchange students at college together in U.K. if that helps.
I’m retired from all that game now unfortunately, but in my 20s, 30s, and 40s, there were two things that I was good at, and the other one was driving.
[/quote

I hope you don't think I was impressed, I was being as sarcastic as I could.
I could care less whether you’re impressed or not, you asked a question, I answered it, end of story.
I was being as sardonic as I could there, there’s a subtle difference.
If you could care less you must care a bit. How much less could you care?
I copied this from a U.S. Forum, it’s by Arika Okrent, ignore it if you wish, it’s just an explanation of how and why, “I could care less” is accepted by a lot of people:

This year I’d like to go over a few good reasons why people say, “I could care less.” The list does not include “because they’re stupid and have no idea how logic works.” It turns out, there are a number of things about English that conspire to make “I could care less” a less irrational phrase than it might seem.


00:0000:57

1. Sarcasm

A number of language writers have suggested that “could care less” has a sarcastic reading, conveying something like “Ha! As if there were something in the world I could care less about.” There are some American Yiddish-inflected phrases that work this way, like “I should be so lucky!” (meaning “there’s no way I’m ever gonna be that lucky”) or “I should care!” (why should I care?). Even if “could care less” didn’t originate from a sarcastic intent, it matches up well enough with these other forms in the language to help give it staying power.

2. Positive/negative phrase pairs

Why use “could care less” if we also have “couldn’t care less”? There are other pairs of phrases in English about which you could ask the same question. Why say “that will teach you to leave your car unlocked” when you really mean “that will teach you not to leave your car unlocked.” Some other phrases that can mean the same thing with or without the negation:

You know squat about that. You don’t know squat about that.

I wonder whether we can make that work. I wonder whether we can’t make that work.

You shouldn’t go, I think. You shouldn’t go, I don’t think.

I can hardly wait. I can’t hardly wait.

Again, there’s an existing framework that helps “could care less” blend right in.

3. Implied comparison

Evidence for the use of “could care less” goes back to 1955, with “couldn’t care less” appearing only about 10 years before that. But long before that the phrase “No one could care less than I” was in use. Think about how you might respond to such a phrase in a certain type of conversation. “I’ve never been so insulted in my life! How dare they imply such a thing! No one could care less for the trappings of fame than I!”

“I could, darling. I could care less.”

The rest of the comparison, “than you,” is left understood. Perhaps “I could care less” also carries a shadow of the original phrase and a hidden comparison. “I could care less … than anyone.”

4. Idioms don’t care about logic

People might not have any thought of sarcasm, positive/negative phrase pairs, or implied comparison when they use “I could care less,” but when they use it, it’s as a set idiom, something they’ve heard before and learned as a unit. We have plenty of idioms that serve us perfectly well, despite the gaps in logic that appear if you look at them too closely. Consider “head over heels” (shouldn’t it be heels over head?) or “have your cake and eat it too?” (shouldn’t it be eat your cake and have it too?) or “the exception proves the rule” (shouldn’t it be the exception invalidates the rule?). There are reasons these idioms developed the way they did, but we don’t have to know anything about those reasons, or the original meanings, to use them perfectly sensibly. Same goes for “I could care less,” which people only ever use to mean “I couldn’t care less,” never the opposite. It doesn’t cause legitimate confusion, though it does cause quite a bit of consternation. In any case, it’s here to stay.

For more on “could care less” see the collection of links on this topic at LanguageLog, columns by Jan Freeman at Boston Globe, John McIntyre at the Baltimore Sun, and Ben Zimmer at Visual Thesaurus, and the snappy overview by Bill Walsh in Yes, I Could Care Less: How to Be a Language Snob Without Being a Jerk

Edited by Frank7 on Friday 28th December 15:08

singlecoil

Original Poster:

27,830 posts

191 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
Frank7 said:
I copied this from a U.S. Forum, it’s by Arika Sato, ignore it if you wish, it’s just an explanation of how and why, “I could care less” is accepted by a lot of people...
I expect John already knows this peculiarly American expression, he's probably asking, in a roundabout way, why YOU are using it. Do you also use expressions like 'reach out' when you meant contacting?

Frank7

3,447 posts

32 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
singlecoil said:
I expect John already knows this peculiarly American expression, he's probably asking, in a roundabout way, why YOU are using it. Do you also use expressions like 'reach out' when you meant contacting?
First off, no I don’t use reach out, but I do use “ballpark” if I’m asking someone for an estimated price to do a job, I’ll also use “sunnavabh!” if something that I didn’t want to happen, happens.
Once in a while, if it warrants, I’ll say, “the whole nine yards”, but that’s it about it, if I have any excuse at all, it’s because I’ve spent extended periods of time in the U.S., and I have many American friends, on both sides of the pond, so “I could care less” comes easily to me.
Second of all, (here I go again), I must sincerely apologise for veering way off thread, but I felt that I had to answer a question, I’ll try to rein it in.

Stella Tortoise

1,405 posts

88 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
I've been going out with a girl
Her name is Julie
But last night she said to me
When we were watching telly

cherryowen

9,063 posts

149 months

Friday 28th December 2018
quotequote all
Poets often take many words to say a simple thing
It takes thought, and rhyme and time, to make a poem sing
With music and words I've been playing; for you I have written a song
To make sure you know what I'm saying, I'll translate as I go along


marcosgt

10,373 posts

121 months

Monday 31st December 2018
quotequote all
Not a big Smiths fan but...

I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour
But heaven knows I'm miserable now
I was looking for a job, and then I found a job
And heaven knows I'm miserable now

M

abzmike

1,409 posts

51 months

Monday 31st December 2018
quotequote all
marcosgt said:
Not a big Smiths fan but...

I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour
But heaven knows I'm miserable now
I was looking for a job, and then I found a job
And heaven knows I'm miserable now

M
Having just completed by tax return, and checked my pension account, this is exactly how I'm feeling now...

Robmarriott

1,777 posts

103 months

Monday 31st December 2018
quotequote all
BigRusko said:
The Verve - The Drug Don't Work

All this talk of getting old
It's getting me down my love
Like a cat in a bag, waiting to drown
This time I'm comin' down

Absolutely spot on for me!
Just read this and the next song on shuffle was this, how odd.

citizensm1th

5,008 posts

82 months

Monday 31st December 2018
quotequote all
The distant echo
Of faraway voices boarding faraway trains
To take them home to
The ones that they love and who love them forever


just a snippet from one of the best lyricists of my generation.

Motown Junk

2,041 posts

162 months

Monday 31st December 2018
quotequote all
It was the morning of All Saint's Day, ninety-eight
When that old blind dog started roaming around the graveyard
Wouldn't have bothered me so much
Were he not walking on his hind legs and smoking cigars