F100 karting, sources of good gen?

F100 karting, sources of good gen?

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waftycranker

Original Poster:

132 posts

27 months

Saturday 29th May
quotequote all
Pepo everybody.

What happen was: I’ve been looking at getting into racing for a while now, veering from fairly standard tin-tops for track, building a special for hill climb or karting. By Tuesday I’d had enough of procrastinating and sent a speculative offer for a kart chassis that was advertised as being eligible for F100. Offer was immediately accepted and the doubts and second guessing kicked in. But I’m a man of my word so I sent payment and arranged a collection date. I’ve had to since push back the date because of this bug that’s going round but should be collecting within the next couple of weeks.

I’m really struggling to find any info about what is eligible or not, there are vague statements about homogulation dates for chassis and engine but how can I find out if my particular chassis was homogulated? Is there a database where you can input the serial number?

Also, with it not being a complete kart i.e. it doesn’t have axles, steering column, etc. can I mix and match with other manufacturers from the same or new periods? Perhaps manufacture some bits myself?

Any information to help progress this project would be greatly appreciated. I have visited many of the various kart websites but there doesn’t seem to be much useful on them, and some don’t seem to have been updated for years.

Thanks in advance.
WC

kimducati

223 posts

131 months

Monday 31st May
quotequote all
Hi
I'm by no means up to date wrt karting, but in the absence of anyone else putting their heads above the parapet, I'll advise as best I know.
Homologation - The chassis will have a plate on it with the homologation details, so when you lay hands on it, take a picture and post it up and I'm sure someone will pipe up with the details. It all really depends on the manufacturer of the chassis as to whether it is homologated for CIK (international) classes or for UK classes (such as TKM, etc.)
Spare parts - A lot of the spares, axles, bearings, wheels, hubs etc. are interchangeable between chassis and manufacturers. We used to buy all of our non specific bits from Dartford Karting, who I believe are still going in some form or another. I can't imagine that Jim (ex proprietor) is still involved - he was / is a legend in his own lunchtime.
F100 - Never heard of it, but as I said, I'm out of date. Maybe means it's suitable for racing in the 'classic' classes, using the old 100cc air or water cooled motors which we used to use. Various manufacturers available, we variously used Rotax, CRG, Vortex, Parilla. I think now that most classes are based on the lower revving 125cc sealed motors, such as Rotax Max or Parilla Lepoard.
For club racing in the UK I think that as long as all the safety equipment such as chain guard and bumpers / side pods / nosecone is up to date then you can race regardless of the homologation date - they don't 'run out' like (say) a helmet homologation does.
That's all I can remember from your post, if anything else comes to mind I'll post again.
Forgot to ask - where are you based? Probably get the best and most up to date information from speaking to people at your local track.
Kim

kimducati

223 posts

131 months

Monday 31st May
quotequote all
OK, curiosity piqued, I searched for F100 Karting and found this: https://www.f100uk.co.uk/

As I suspected, it's for the 'classic' 100cc reed or rotary valve motors, in water or air cooled (depending on chassis age) versions.
So, once you've i/d'd your chassis and found its homologation plate, you'll then know what class you'll be running in, depending on age.
Usual motor sport caveat now starting to apply - don't think that this is going to be cheap. The motors are getting on a bit by now and probably thin on the ground = pricy!! Also you'll need to find at least two, better three, preferably all the same and a decent engine builder / tuner.
When we were karting (a loooooooooooong time ago) the motors were 'lifed' at 45 minutes when being pushed, maybe 90 minutes in practice. After this, they went to our engine builder for a refresh - check the bottom end and rod, replace as required, new piston / ring & hone the bore. If you run them too long and / or over rev them, the rod will stretch and then nasty things can happen!!
Having said all of that, if I was a bit younger / fitter I'd build a kart and have a go in a heartbeat.
Take a good look around on that website - all the info you need is there if you search for it, including the regulations for the various classes - tells you everything you need to know about that side of things. Read and inwardly digest until you understand - these are very simple regs and a good introduction into the art of understanding what you can and can't do.
Sorry if that sounds a bit patronising - it just came out that way and better that you're told straight.;)
hth
Kim

waftycranker

Original Poster:

132 posts

27 months

Tuesday 1st June
quotequote all
Hi Kim, thanks for the reply. I’ve since found out that it’s from 2000-2002 period so hopefully eligible for the water-cooled class (Aqua).

It’s a Mari mk6 chassis, I’ve found very little on info on the web about it. Good to know that hubs, axles, etc. are readily interchangeable between different chassis. If I find the chassis isn’t eligible for F100 aqua my next preference would be some sort of classic TKM, Tal-Ko really seem to have great parts availability so that would make things so much easier.

From what I understand I’d be racing in the ‘heavy’ class in Aqua and so use the Parilla Lynx Maxi engine. I plan on doing the rebuilds myself as tinkering is half the appeal.

Camberley Kart Club (Blackbushe) is nearest track/club to me but they just look like they race Rotax and TKM.


kimducati

223 posts

131 months

Tuesday 1st June
quotequote all
Hi again,

I think you should be OK for the aqua class with that chassis. I don't know much (anything) about the Parilla Lynx / Lepoard motors, other than they were brought in as a competitor to Rotax Max, so lower revving and hence longer life.
The Mari Kart was a bit 'left field' back in the day, most seemed to go for Tony Kart or one of its clones. It will be a CIK homologated chassis and won't be suitable for TKM as they (Tal-Ko) have their own homologation list, which are all UK manufactured (supposedly).
If all else fails, get a Rotax Max motor (with its log book) and run it in that class at a club of your choice. Without the log book, you won't be able to race it, at least you never used to be able to! It'll be a bit of relatively cheap fun and you'll at least then know if it's something you want to carry on doing.
The Rotax Max motors are sealed and have to be maintained by an approved person to the 'fiche', i.e. built to the original spec.
As I said, I don't know anything about the 'Aqua' motors and whether you can maintain them yourself.
The older 100cc air or water cooled motors are built like clocks - the tolerances are tiny so I wouldn't suggest doing anything more than a top end (piston / ring / hone) overhaul yourself, unless you've got engineering facilities. For instance, replacing the big end entails pressing the crank apart, sizing, shimming and fitting the new bearing, reassembling the crank (50 ton press required) and then re - trueing it. Not difficult as long as you have the kit.
Depending on where you actually live, there's also Forest Edge Kart Club, between Winchester and Andover which isn't a million miles away. Maybe could also be a possibility.
I hope you got the chassis cheap, otherwise with all the bits you'll need to buy, you could've bought a 'going concern' with everything you need cheaper. Tbh that still may be the cheapest way forward. Sorry
Kim