Cost of living squeeze in 2022

Author
Discussion

Throttlebody

1,426 posts

31 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
number2 said:
bhstewie said:
Throttlebody said:
The Govt is now deleveraging after years of debt fuelled growth and consumerism.

The slow burn of reality is gathering pace after years of feeding on the illusion of feeling richer through cheap finance and asset acquisitions.

People that have nice properties, nice cars but own nothing. The illusion of wealth is slowly unwinding. The duration of this correction process hasn’t registered yet, many hope it’s going to be short lived. Wrong, gotta get with the new program.
Tasteless gloating aside what does that even mean?
They are a harbinger of doom and misery, spreading their rhetoric across the forum.
The bringer of awareness regarding the current dire UK economic path and huge financial deleveraging now in progress?

Everybody watching it slowly roll out but preferring not to acknowledge the implications. The price of Weetabix is much more comforting.



survivalist

4,643 posts

167 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Throttlebody said:
number2 said:
bhstewie said:
Throttlebody said:
The Govt is now deleveraging after years of debt fuelled growth and consumerism.

The slow burn of reality is gathering pace after years of feeding on the illusion of feeling richer through cheap finance and asset acquisitions.

People that have nice properties, nice cars but own nothing. The illusion of wealth is slowly unwinding. The duration of this correction process hasn’t registered yet, many hope it’s going to be short lived. Wrong, gotta get with the new program.
Tasteless gloating aside what does that even mean?
They are a harbinger of doom and misery, spreading their rhetoric across the forum.
The bringer of awareness regarding the current dire UK economic path and huge financial deleveraging now in progress?

Everybody watching it slowly roll out but preferring not to acknowledge the implications. The price of Weetabix is much more comforting.
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.

tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.

Sway

23,196 posts

171 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
Yet what survivalist describes is exactly what has happened in every single crash in recorded history.

And you can't point to a single example where your assertions have come about.

Dunning-Kruger is strong in you.

tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Sway said:
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
Yet what survivalist describes is exactly what has happened in every single crash in recorded history.

And you can't point to a single example where your assertions have come about.

Dunning-Kruger is strong in you.
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.

loafer123

13,480 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.

survivalist

4,643 posts

167 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
I bow to such a well reasoned retort rofl

Square Leg

13,403 posts

166 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
survivalist said:
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
I bow to such a well reasoned retort rofl
Ignoring the bellend in the middle for one minute, in a recession where those with capital buy to invest - how do tenants pay rent (particularly the high rents of today) without jobs?

survivalist

4,643 posts

167 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Square Leg said:
survivalist said:
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
I bow to such a well reasoned retort rofl
Ignoring the bellend in the middle for one minute, in a recession where those with capital buy to invest - how do tenants pay rent (particularly the high rents of today) without jobs?
Plenty of options. Lower rents for those who have been invested for a while, government support for those who are unable to meet their commitments.

Sure, some younger folk will at home for longer than they had wanted / planned.

Fundamental issue is a lack of homes in area where there are decent jobs and rocketing inflation rates that mean property investment is still a better option than a savings account.

Square Leg

13,403 posts

166 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
survivalist said:
Square Leg said:
survivalist said:
tannhauser said:
survivalist said:
Define huge.

In reality this will hit those who have high levels debt and large mortgages. It’s not nearly as many people as some think, as at least a 3rd of UK homes are owned outright. Another 3rd can easily ride out increased interest rates. The vast majority of the remaining third will sit tight and ride our the pain.

Sadly the harder the crash, the more unobtainable property ownership will become for those without large amounts of capital. Banks will withdraw low deposit mortgages and favour investors (who are happy to pay higher interest rates because their tenants are paying the mortgage .

Those with significant capital to invest will do well if we enter recession, just as they have every other time.

The misguided think that a drop in property values will benefit the lower earners, in reality it widens the wealth gap and rewards those with capital.
Bullste.
I bow to such a well reasoned retort rofl
Ignoring the bellend in the middle for one minute, in a recession where those with capital buy to invest - how do tenants pay rent (particularly the high rents of today) without jobs?
Plenty of options. Lower rents for those who have been invested for a while, government support for those who are unable to meet their commitments.

Sure, some younger folk will at home for longer than they had wanted / planned.

Fundamental issue is a lack of homes in area where there are decent jobs and rocketing inflation rates that mean property investment is still a better option than a savings account.
Thank you.

tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
survivalist said:
Plenty of options. Lower rents for those who have been invested for a while, government support for those who are unable to meet their commitments.

Sure, some younger folk will at home for longer than they had wanted / planned.

Fundamental issue is a lack of homes in area where there are decent jobs and rocketing inflation rates that mean property investment is still a better option than a savings account.
And where does the money from this government support come from? How is this ethical?

And oh yeah, let's fk over the younger generation even more. They won't mind.

I really do hope all you rentier types lose your shirts.

monthou

2,974 posts

27 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
I really do hope all you rentier types lose your shirts.
What's a rentier type?

tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
monthou said:
What's a rentier type?
Ever heard of Google?

loafer123

13,480 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
And where does the money from this government support come from? How is this ethical?

And oh yeah, let's fk over the younger generation even more. They won't mind.

I really do hope all you rentier types lose your shirts.

monthou

2,974 posts

27 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
monthou said:
What's a rentier type?
Ever heard of Google?
You really are a charmer.

Throttlebody

1,426 posts

31 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
loafer123 said:
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.
BOE quantitative tightening, double digit real inflation, interest rates rising, recession priced in, consumer confidence tanking, cheap and easy money ended. Live right now. Cyclic world and the adjustment is accelerating.


tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Throttlebody said:
loafer123 said:
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.
BOE quantitative tightening, double digit real inflation, interest rates rising, recession priced in, consumer confidence tanking, cheap and easy money ended. Live right now. Cyclic world and the adjustment is accelerating.
It's actually quite funny. I'm looking forward to it.

Sway

23,196 posts

171 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
tannhauser said:
Throttlebody said:
loafer123 said:
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.
BOE quantitative tightening, double digit real inflation, interest rates rising, recession priced in, consumer confidence tanking, cheap and easy money ended. Live right now. Cyclic world and the adjustment is accelerating.
It's actually quite funny. I'm looking forward to it.
None of which is 'unprecedented' - and yet the outcomes you claim you want have NEVER happened.

Of course, whilst you claim to want to punish the 'rentier types' - you completely ignore the majority who aren't, are mortgaged owner occupiers and for which what you're 'looking for' will cause a lot of pain.

It'll cause even more pain for those without a secure and high enough income to have gotten on the ladder.

Including yourself, with your 'assets' being eroded fast, and lending being tightened...

You really are obnoxious. Wishing harm on millions in order (in theory) to hurt tens of thousands that you despise.

Deep Thought

31,054 posts

174 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Sway said:
tannhauser said:
Throttlebody said:
loafer123 said:
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.
BOE quantitative tightening, double digit real inflation, interest rates rising, recession priced in, consumer confidence tanking, cheap and easy money ended. Live right now. Cyclic world and the adjustment is accelerating.
It's actually quite funny. I'm looking forward to it.
None of which is 'unprecedented' - and yet the outcomes you claim you want have NEVER happened.

Of course, whilst you claim to want to punish the 'rentier types' - you completely ignore the majority who aren't, are mortgaged owner occupiers and for which what you're 'looking for' will cause a lot of pain.

It'll cause even more pain for those without a secure and high enough income to have gotten on the ladder.

Including yourself, with your 'assets' being eroded fast, and lending being tightened...

You really are obnoxious. Wishing harm on millions in order (in theory) to hurt tens of thousands that you despise.
Yup. Both him and ThroBo. Bitter, sad individuals.


Edited by Deep Thought on Saturday 14th May 22:44

tannhauser

1,607 posts

192 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Deep Thought said:
Sway said:
tannhauser said:
Throttlebody said:
loafer123 said:
tannhauser said:
I'd say where we are now is pretty much unprecedented.
As ever, you are hopecasting.
BOE quantitative tightening, double digit real inflation, interest rates rising, recession priced in, consumer confidence tanking, cheap and easy money ended. Live right now. Cyclic world and the adjustment is accelerating.
It's actually quite funny. I'm looking forward to it.
None of which is 'unprecedented' - and yet the outcomes you claim you want have NEVER happened.

Of course, whilst you claim to want to punish the 'rentier types' - you completely ignore the majority who aren't, are mortgaged owner occupiers and for which what you're 'looking for' will cause a lot of pain.

It'll cause even more pain for those without a secure and high enough income to have gotten on the ladder.

Including yourself, with your 'assets' being eroded fast, and lending being tightened...

You really are obnoxious. Wishing harm on millions in order (in theory) to hurt tens of thousands that you despise.
Yup. Both him and ThroBo. Bitter, sad individuals.


Edited by Deep Thought on Saturday 14th May 22:44
Oh stop it, you’re hurting my feelings laugh