Does money really buy happiness?

Does money really buy happiness?

Author
Discussion

Mr Spoon

Original Poster:

1,570 posts

15 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Not having enough money will certainly make someone unhappy. When I refer to not enough, I mean not enough for a basic living standard, shelter, food etc.

What about being able to buy whatever you want, whenever you want?

What about financially secure or wealthy people? Those who can maintain a lifestyle for a significant period, years, not months, weeks or days without an income?

When does the average wealthy person stop living beyond their means?

roadsmash

2,533 posts

47 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Money gives you options.

Sometimes the options can be bad.

Stuart70

3,047 posts

160 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
I think Mr Maslow covered this pretty well…

Mr Spoon

Original Poster:

1,570 posts

15 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Stuart70 said:
I think Mr Maslow covered this pretty well…
But Mr Maslow is not on PH. biggrin

dundarach

3,536 posts

205 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
No, but it helps someone who hasn't realised (or can't achieve) the secret to it...

Stuart70

3,047 posts

160 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Mr Spoon said:
Stuart70 said:
I think Mr Maslow covered this pretty well…
But Mr Maslow is not on PH. biggrin
He may be along shortly, I think he is busy extolling the virtues of the latest Dacia on another thread smile

Derek Chevalier

3,433 posts

150 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Mr Spoon said:
Not having enough money will certainly make someone unhappy. When I refer to not enough, I mean not enough for a basic living standard, shelter, food etc.

What about being able to buy whatever you want, whenever you want?

What about financially secure or wealthy people? Those who can maintain a lifestyle for a significant period, years, not months, weeks or days without an income?

When does the average wealthy person stop living beyond their means?
No. I think it can lead to a certain restlessness, not contentment.

bitchstewie

40,464 posts

187 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
I don't think it buys happiness but to paraphrase something I just read debt removes options having money adds them.

TwigtheWonderkid

38,343 posts

127 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
it doesn't buy happiness, but it allows you to be miserable in nicer surroundings.

AC43

10,062 posts

185 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
From the Rich bds Frenzy in Bike magazine in the 80's;

"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a better class of misery".

Djtemeka

1,529 posts

169 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
I’d rather cry in a Bentley than a corsa biggrin

Hang On

458 posts

57 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Yes it does. If you enjoy the freedom to do what you want where and whenever you wish. If you appreciate nice stuff and it makes you smile to surround yourself with it. If you appreciate fine food and fine wines. If your mind, freed up from the stress and clutter that worrying about money brings, can focus on creative and intellectual pursuits and enjoying friends and family. If you get happiness from helping people out and contributing to charity regularly. Yes, money is the driving force behind happiness.

You’d have to be a sad sort to have wealth and not find happiness. And for that sort, even if life is a st sandwich, the more bread you have the less st you have to taste.

Edited by Hang On on Saturday 14th May 09:32

highway

1,584 posts

237 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
No, but it lets your rent it for a while.

Shnozz

25,124 posts

248 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
roadsmash said:
Money gives you options.

Sometimes the options can be bad.
This. Gives you freedom, choices and the insurance to take some risks you might not otherwise.

Fusion777

616 posts

25 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Djtemeka said:
I’d rather cry in a Bentley than a corsa biggrin
But would you rather be happy in a Corsa than cry in a Bentley?

Money can also bring complications. Look at the number of threads we have on here analysing pension and investment strategies. If you have large amounts, some might feel or be pressured by obligations, or even guilt.

You could also fall into the Dan Bilzerian trap of becoming bored and numb because you have bought everything you ever wanted, and now there's nothing left for you to buy. You could argue he's just suffering from a lack of imagination though. He's probably also paranoid about whether people are hanging around with him just because he's rich. Do your friends like you for you, or for your money?

Simpo Two

78,413 posts

242 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
I think contentment is more important. 'Happiness' is unsustainable. And yes, more wealth can bring bigger problems.

Very few people can buy whatever they want - tycoons, oligarchs, Saudi royals - at that level everything is effectively free. If you want a personal jet airliner - just ask your fixer to order one. It's not a life I'd care for.

Derek Chevalier

3,433 posts

150 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Hang On said:
Yes it does. If you enjoy the freedom to do what you want where and whenever you wish. If you appreciate nice stuff and it makes you smile to surround yourself with it. If you appreciate fine food and fine wines. If your mind, freed up from the stress and clutter that worrying about money brings, can focus on creative and intellectual pursuits and enjoying friends and family. If you get happiness from helping people out and contributing to charity regularly. Yes, money is the driving force behind happiness.

You’d have to be a sad sort to have wealth and not find happiness. And for that sort, even if life is a st sandwich, the more bread you have the less st you have to taste.

Edited by Hang On on Saturday 14th May 09:32
But for me this can be achieved with a decent level of wealth (being "well off" in old terms). Potentially a couple of magnitudes different to genuine FU money which comes with very different challenges.

NortonES2

130 posts

25 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
As someone once said:-

I've been poor and miserable and also rich and miserable, rich is better.

Muzzer79

6,379 posts

164 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Hang On said:
Yes it does. If you enjoy the freedom to do what you want where and whenever you wish. If you appreciate nice stuff and it makes you smile to surround yourself with it. If you appreciate fine food and fine wines. If your mind, freed up from the stress and clutter that worrying about money brings, can focus on creative and intellectual pursuits and enjoying friends and family. If you get happiness from helping people out and contributing to charity regularly. Yes, money is the driving force behind happiness.

You’d have to be a sad sort to have wealth and not find happiness. And for that sort, even if life is a st sandwich, the more bread you have the less st you have to taste.

Edited by Hang On on Saturday 14th May 09:32
There’s a lot of ‘ifs’ in your post, so it really should have opened with
“Yes it can” rather than “Yes it does”

Your last paragraph speaks volumes too. Some rich people are “sad sorts” ergo, for them, money cannot buy happiness.

Simpo Two

78,413 posts

242 months

Saturday 14th May
quotequote all
Muzzer79 said:
Your last paragraph speaks volumes too. Some rich people are “sad sorts” ergo, for them, money cannot buy happiness.
And by contrast some of the happiest people I know have very little money. But they have lots of friends and are just basically nice people. The only embuggerance is that when they invite you to a party you have to take your own food and drink because they can't afford to cater for 20 people.