Planners being conservative

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Discussion

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
I’ve put in for planning and the case officer has just been to visit site because one of my neighbours has kicked off.
I got the feeling from him that they are going to refuse it because it’s “different”.
To say I’m a bit pissed off is a understatement.

2gins

1,491 posts

103 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
I'm not a planning expert by any stretch but if there are other properties like yours nearby or next door then that is totally out of keeping with the area and I can well see why it would be objected to. If I lived next door to you and my neighbours intended to do that, I'd have something to say about it as well.
What's the street like, is it typical suburban semi/detached etc or rural and out of the way, large plots, no near neighbours etc?

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
It’s typical 1980,s developer rubbish with obligatory upvc conservatory. It is detached neighbours to the side but field to the rear.

So

15,519 posts

163 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Marmax said:
I’ve put in for planning and the case officer has just been to visit site because one of my neighbours has kicked off.
I got the feeling from him that they are going to refuse it because it’s “different”.
To say I’m a bit pissed off is a understatement.
In my experience, planners prefer exactly the opposite. They like to see an extension that reflects the time it was built, even if it appears to a layperson like it's totally out of keeping.






Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
So said:
In my experience, planners prefer exactly the opposite. They like to see extensions that reflect the time they were built, even if it appears to a layperson like it's totally out of keeping.
That’s what I would have thought but it wasn’t the impression I was given today.
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tonker

55,751 posts

189 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Can they see into your garden , or stare at your naked magnificence as you stretch in the morning?

barryrs

2,670 posts

164 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
I like the concept but do have a couple of comments.

Is that a balcony? Thats a big No in my area unless some screening is introduced.
Is the 2 storey extension higher than the eaves? It might be worth introducing an element of pitched roof even if just a 1m or 2 as it will lessen the impact to the neighbour.

Toltec

5,702 posts

164 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Marmax said:
So said:
In my experience, planners prefer exactly the opposite. They like to see extensions that reflect the time they were built, even if it appears to a layperson like it's totally out of keeping.
That’s what I would have thought but it wasn’t the impression I was given today.
We are having to build a house that looks like it was built in the fifties then modernised. Tried for something more contemporary, but it wasn't to the planning officers taste. She seemed to have a preference for neo-mocktudor or faux Georgian mcmansions.

blueg33

20,716 posts

165 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
I assume that extension is the back of the house?

If its the front I would expect it to be refused.

The problem you have is that with neighbour objections it will go to committee and then you are exposed to all sorts of subjective opinions on architecture.

DoubleD

7,722 posts

49 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
It does look rather......odd, so I can see why others would be concerned.

So

15,519 posts

163 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
DoubleD said:
It does look rather......odd, so I can see why others would be concerned.
I don't agree, I think it is good.

I'd check the dimensions to make sure the new extension is approximately 1.62 times wide as it is tall. If it was architect designed it probably is. But I think it's a good effort.


wisbech

872 posts

62 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
So said:
In my experience, planners prefer exactly the opposite. They like to see an extension that reflects the time it was built, even if it appears to a layperson like it's totally out of keeping.
I like it too - but is 1920-30 Bauhaus reflective of now or 100 years ago...?

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
tonker said:
Can they see into your garden , or stare at your naked magnificence as you stretch in the morning?
No, my neighbour likes 10ft high hedges.

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
barryrs said:
I like the concept but do have a couple of comments.

Is that a balcony? Thats a big No in my area unless some screening is introduced.
Is the 2 storey extension higher than the eaves? It might be worth introducing an element of pitched roof even if just a 1m or 2 as it will lessen the impact to the neighbour.
The architect did originally spec a balcony but I got them to scrap it.

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Toltec said:
We are having to build a house that looks like it was built in the fifties then modernised. Tried for something more contemporary, but it wasn't to the planning officers taste. She seemed to have a preference for neo-mocktudor or faux Georgian mcmansions.
I feel your pain. smilesmile

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
wisbech said:
I like it too - but is 1920-30 Bauhaus reflective of now or 100 years ago...?
Design and taste comes and goes. I don’t think 1980 Barrat houses met either.

Rangeroverover

1,353 posts

52 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
wheres Equus?

Equus

5,837 posts

42 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Rangeroverover said:
wheres Equus?
Marmax said:
It’s typical 1980,s developer rubbish with obligatory upvc conservatory. It is detached neighbours to the side but field to the rear.
I think this is your problem, bluntly.

Ironically, if it was attached to something with a bit more character, they might be more receptive to it (indeed there have been RIBA prize winners that take a not dissimilar approach).

Attached to a 1980's brick box, it becomes an exercise in turd polishing.

Or to use another analogy: if you see a Ferrari being driven by someone young, obviously rich, and glamorous, that's fine. If you see one being driven by an older person of sophsticated appearance, that's fine, too.

If you see one being driven by a 5'4" bloke with a beer belly and a combover, dressed in a polyester suit, that's just cringe inducing...

Not all of us can be glamorous and well presented, of course (...don't I know it?), but if you're really very average, you should at least have the good taste to recognise the fact, and not pretend to be something you aren't.

FWIIW, I don't dislike the approach, but I think it needs a parent property with greater strength of character to carry it off.

:stands back and waits for the abuse:

boxedin

Marmax

Original Poster:

44 posts

21 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Equus said:
I think this is your problem, bluntly.

Ironically, if it was attached to something with a bit more character, they might be more receptive to it (indeed there have been RIBA prize winners that take a not dissimilar approach).

Attached to a 1980's brick box, it becomes an exercise in turd polishing.

Or to use another analogy: if you see a Ferrari being driven by someone young, obviously rich, and glamorous, that's fine. If you see one being driven by an older person of sophsticated appearance, that's fine, too.

If you see one being driven by a 5'4" bloke with a beer belly and a combover, dressed in a polyester suit, that's just cringe inducing...

Not all of us can be glamorous and well presented, of course (...don't I know it?), but if you're really very average, you should at least have the good taste to recognise the fact, and not pretend to be something you aren't.

FWIIW, I don't dislike the approach, but I think it needs a parent property with greater strength of character to carry it off.

:stands back and waits for the abuse:

boxedin
I agree fully it is polishing a turd but I think it’s better to polish it than stick another turd on it.

Equus

5,837 posts

42 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Marmax said:
I agree fully it is polishing a turd but I think it’s better to polish it than stick another turd on it.
Well, I think you might find that the Planners disagree.

They may well take the view (and I would support them to some degree) that the character of the neighbouring development simply isn't robust enough to carry it off.


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