I got wood

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Discussion

S6PNJ

4,331 posts

250 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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I cut some 2.5" thick boards (max about 28" wide) with my 41 (ish) year old Homelite 550 chainsaw last week - now drying / seasoning which will take about 1-2 years. They will hopefully end up as a nice oak garden table. The top board cut from the 'log' is considered scrap (or used for odds and sods) and it is the next 2 boards (both with cut faces) that will become usable boards. Ther are still another 3 boards or so to be cut but that will be left for anotehr day.




eps

5,603 posts

238 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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Nice!

Harry Flashman

Original Poster:

15,642 posts

211 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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How on earth did you do that with a chainsaw??

rxe

5,426 posts

72 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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Harry Flashman said:
How on earth did you do that with a chainsaw??
You need a frame for the saw that holds it sideways, Then you nail a ladder along the length of the log and let the frame guide the saw along the length. Very, very satisfying, and quite hard work. Google “chainsaw milling” for billions of videos....

S6PNJ

4,331 posts

250 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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Harry Flashman said:
How on earth did you do that with a chainsaw??
With something called a chainsaw mill - they used to be called an 'Alaskan' chainsaw mill but that's a bit like calling a vacuum a hoover IYKWIM. You also need (or should) have the chain sharpened to an angle of 10 degrees vs the 'normal' 30 it is sharpened to, for normal cross cutting (for logs etc). My chainsaw is a bit small for this log though as it is *only* 84cc with a 30" bar and I'm cutting oak.

My (home) set-up (from a previous log, not the one above):

The ladder is used to create a flat surface for the first cut, then once that board is off, the chainsaw mill 'sits' on the flat cut surface and cuts the next (useful) board.

Typical (cheap) chinese 'alaskan' mill (click for bigger pic):


such as found on eBay (or Aliexpress etc etc) - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/353224747670

Edited for spooling and typos

Edited by S6PNJ on Tuesday 2nd February 18:45

dickymint

19,783 posts

227 months

Tuesday 2nd February
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Harry Flashman said:
How on earth did you do that with a chainsaw??
See the ladder in the background? That'll be used as a straightedge and the saw would have a "frame" fixed to it. It's known as milling.

Edit: Ooops i forgot to press the post button.

But there you have it from the OP himself. thumbup

This guy shows how and makes a bench too but didn't wait to season it............

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96I7OLDXQt4


Edited by dickymint on Tuesday 2nd February 18:58

snowandrocks

875 posts

111 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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The snow has finally retreated far enough to allow me into the forest to collect some of the 10 tonne stack i bought back in December so I got to try out a new toy.

I like using an electric saw for firewood to save messing around with starting and stopping, mixing fuel etc so decided to try out this self sharpening Oregon from Screwfix.

Cut up a few trailer loads today and it seems pretty good - 45cm bar and plenty of power. Light, seems well made and the self sharpener works well with a satisfying spray of sparks. Was only £100 and is guaranteed for 3 years so can't go too far wrong.


Beerfinch

14 posts

24 months

Tuesday 23rd February
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Looks like the same model I posted a few pages back thumbup.

I've been really happy with it and for simple stuff within extension lead range of a plug socket I think electric is the way to go.

My only complaint is that it seems to dump chain oil on the floor wherever it's stored but my petrol Ryobi does that too so I don't know if it's just a cheap chainsaw thing or whether I'm doing something wrong confused

jet_noise

4,801 posts

151 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Beerfinch said:
Looks like the same model I posted a few pages back thumbup.

I've been really happy with it and for simple stuff within extension lead range of a plug socket I think electric is the way to go.

My only complaint is that it seems to dump chain oil on the floor wherever it's stored but my petrol Ryobi does that too so I don't know if it's just a cheap chainsaw thing or whether I'm doing something wrong confused
£70 here
That's a great price.

I've a Bosch wired saw and that is mildly incontinent in storage too. I sit it on a piece of thick cardboard, is enough to absorb.

Dog Star

12,952 posts

137 months

Wednesday 24th February
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jet_noise said:
£70 here
That's a great price.
Hmmmm... wonder if those are just returns, unused, used and returned etc etc

I could do with one really. My dad who is over 80, can't use one due to onset of age etc has two of them. He will never use them again but won't let me borrow one either.

(I bought a new concrete mixer - he has four but wouldn't lend me one in case I got it dirty. I kid you not).

snowandrocks

875 posts

111 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Even better at £70! I didn't notice the earlier recommendation, happened to be at Screwfix and thought I'd try it.

Will be interesting to see how long the chain lasts but it seems to stay sharp for quite a long time so hopefully it's alright.

Evoluzione

6,618 posts

212 months

Wednesday 24th February
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S6PNJ said:
I cut some 2.5" thick boards (max about 28" wide) with my 41 (ish) year old Homelite 550 chainsaw last week - now drying / seasoning which will take about 1-2 years. They will hopefully end up as a nice oak garden table. The top board cut from the 'log' is considered scrap (or used for odds and sods) and it is the next 2 boards (both with cut faces) that will become usable boards. Ther are still another 3 boards or so to be cut but that will be left for anotehr day.
Don't forget to seal the ends, it helps stop the splitting as it dries.
What they use I don't know, it's usually waxy. Wood turners dip the ends of logs they're drying in hot wax.

S6PNJ

4,331 posts

250 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
Evoluzione said:
S6PNJ said:
I cut some 2.5" thick boards (max about 28" wide) with my 41 (ish) year old Homelite 550 chainsaw last week - now drying / seasoning which will take about 1-2 years. They will hopefully end up as a nice oak garden table. The top board cut from the 'log' is considered scrap (or used for odds and sods) and it is the next 2 boards (both with cut faces) that will become usable boards. There are still another 3 boards or so to be cut but that will be left for anotehr day.
Don't forget to seal the ends, it helps stop the splitting as it dries.
What they use I don't know, it's usually waxy. Wood turners dip the ends of logs they're drying in hot wax.
Thanks - I know about sealing the ends - people generally use a variety of PVA glue, old paint, or basically anything waterproof. I'm not worried about these boards as they are only 'American oak' and the trunk has been down 4 or 5 years, so any splitting has already happened. Still need to cut my other boards but as the ground is so wet and boggy, I need it to dry out a bit first.

jet_noise

4,801 posts

151 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
Dog Star said:
jet_noise said:
£70 here
That's a great price.
Hmmmm... wonder if those are just returns, unused, used and returned etc etc

I could do with one really. My dad who is over 80, can't use one due to onset of age etc has two of them. He will never use them again but won't let me borrow one either.

(I bought a new concrete mixer - he has four but wouldn't lend me one in case I got it dirty. I kid you not).
Ah, too good to be true maybe.
Odd that there's so many from one source.
Feedback is +ve from customers who've bought one.

Trichloroacetaldehyde chic

5,225 posts

89 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Oregon do the Powersharp attachment (bar, chain, and a stone that clips on the end to sharpen) and I still have a couple on old Stihls. Sharpens reasonably well, presume it is the same tech as the self sharpener electrics. Cuts reasonably well too, convenience is it's huge bonus.
Chains are (were?) expensive but I don't use these saws that often anyway. Really handy when you are cutting trees down at the very base of the trunk where they tend to be full of fine grit which blunts your chain in no time.

MK1RS Bruce

520 posts

107 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
snowandrocks said:
The snow has finally retreated far enough to allow me into the forest to collect some of the 10 tonne stack i bought back in December so I got to try out a new toy.

I like using an electric saw for firewood to save messing around with starting and stopping, mixing fuel etc so decided to try out this self sharpening Oregon from Screwfix.

Cut up a few trailer loads today and it seems pretty good - 45cm bar and plenty of power. Light, seems well made and the self sharpener works well with a satisfying spray of sparks. Was only £100 and is guaranteed for 3 years so can't go too far wrong.

Hi Snowandrocks

which forrest are you buying your firewood from? I am looking to buy some from the clashandarroch

Chris Type R

6,490 posts

218 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
Trichloroacetaldehyde chic said:
Oregon do the Powersharp attachment (bar, chain, and a stone that clips on the end to sharpen) and I still have a couple on old Stihls. Sharpens reasonably well, presume it is the same tech as the self sharpener electrics. Cuts reasonably well too, convenience is it's huge bonus.
Chains are (were?) expensive but I don't use these saws that often anyway. Really handy when you are cutting trees down at the very base of the trunk where they tend to be full of fine grit which blunts your chain in no time.
I wonder if something like https://www.oregonproducts.com/en/powersharp%c2%ae... (16") would fit on my Makita 14" electric https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00LTVD16E/

A longer bar and the option to sharpen the chain would be handy - compatibility shows Makita UC3500 which I'm guessing refers to the product family.

Trichloroacetaldehyde chic

5,225 posts

89 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
If your bar mount is the same, and the chain pitch is the same (you can probably ignore the gauge, unless the mains electrics have a weird sprocket that dictates it) then you should be good to go.
Some impressive demonstrations of them on YouTube from when they first brought them out, killing the chain by stuffing it into a concrete block and then sharpening again in a couple of seconds. Also - I hate sharpening chains now, but used to hate it even more, so something that worked quickly after you'd just hit an old nail or a 3" diameter stone that had no place being inside a tree anyway made them a sensible buy. With man maths.

dickymint

19,783 posts

227 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
Chris Type R said:
Trichloroacetaldehyde chic said:
Oregon do the Powersharp attachment (bar, chain, and a stone that clips on the end to sharpen) and I still have a couple on old Stihls. Sharpens reasonably well, presume it is the same tech as the self sharpener electrics. Cuts reasonably well too, convenience is it's huge bonus.
Chains are (were?) expensive but I don't use these saws that often anyway. Really handy when you are cutting trees down at the very base of the trunk where they tend to be full of fine grit which blunts your chain in no time.
I wonder if something like https://www.oregonproducts.com/en/powersharp%c2%ae... (16") would fit on my Makita 14" electric https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00LTVD16E/

A longer bar and the option to sharpen the chain would be handy - compatibility shows Makita UC3500 which I'm guessing refers to the product family.
On your link to the chain - click on "model fit guide" it does list several Makita cordless saws. Makita use different model numbers in the USA for the same in the UK so highly likely it will fit.

I'd give https://www.radmoretucker.co.uk/ a ring . They're very helpful and would sort you out.

Chris Type R

6,490 posts

218 months

Wednesday 24th February
quotequote all
dickymint said:
On your link to the chain - click on "model fit guide" it does list several Makita cordless saws. Makita use different model numbers in the USA for the same in the UK so highly likely it will fit.

I'd give https://www.radmoretucker.co.uk/ a ring . They're very helpful and would sort you out.
Cool - thanks smile