Roof Moss - is it worth having it removed?

Roof Moss - is it worth having it removed?

Author
Discussion

peterperkins

2,594 posts

203 months

Tuesday 27th October 2020
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I look on roof moss as a free extra layer of naturally accumulating insulation and tile protection.

Presumably if you left it long enough the house would turn into one of those subterranean earth houses with a delicious peaty topping.

Mazinbrum

403 posts

139 months

Tuesday 27th October 2020
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peterperkins said:
I look on roof moss as a free extra layer of naturally accumulating insulation and tile protection.

Presumably if you left it long enough the house would turn into one of those subterranean earth houses with a delicious peaty topping.
The trouble is a lot of moss seems to end up on our patio, I’m thinking about the copper strip but I’m not getting up there myself.

J6542

307 posts

5 months

Tuesday 27th October 2020
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The copper strip along the ridge only really keeps the top 3 or 4 tiles moss free. It’s best to get it removed since it damages the roof over time.

Robertj21a

9,905 posts

66 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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Mazinbrum said:
The trouble is a lot of moss seems to end up on our patio, I’m thinking about the copper strip but I’m not getting up there myself.
I reckon that you'd need loads of copper strip all across the roof to have much impact. I'm not convinced that it is sufficiently effective anyway.

RonaldMcDonaldAteMyCat

10,025 posts

56 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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Why would someone jetwash a roof? Surely you're just asking for trouble?

GetCarter

27,519 posts

240 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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We live in a forest and have to have it removed every 8 years or so. It's a PITA and takes two men about 2 days. No pressure washer used!

The Mad Monk

7,989 posts

78 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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Too Late said:
We live with some big trees around the house and we are prone to some moss on the roof. Our house was built in the 1960's and has never had a roof clean. The neighbors have just had it done and it looks like a brand new roof

It got me thinking if we needed to do our roof.
Has anyone had their roof cleaned?
Is it worth doing?

Thanks
Toolate
Where's the OP gone?

Or are we too late?

rufmeister

1,057 posts

83 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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RonaldMcDonaldAteMyCat said:
Why would someone jetwash a roof? Surely you're just asking for trouble?
We occasionally steam a roof if the client wishes. 95% we “softwash” which is in line with tile manufacturers guidelines.

Generally you see our travelling friends pressure washing roofs.

Mark Benson

5,884 posts

230 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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rufmeister said:
Generally you see our travelling friends pressure washing roofs.
I watched some jetwashing our elderly neighbour's roof last year. They were spraying upwards so the jet went under the tiles, walking all over the roof without ladders and at one point one of them saw me looking, slipped on his arse and slid right down the roof onto the garage. At that point I went round and had a chat with my neighbour and together we kicked them out, the neighbour paying them half, which is more than I would have done.

We got my builder to go up and assess the damage, lots of broken tiles with two dozen or so that needed replacing, fortunately we were having an extension built and we gave them the ones off our roof.

V8RX7

20,945 posts

224 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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I'm surrounded by big trees

When I was replacing a bay roof I gave it a quick sweep with a stiff brush

It looked the same within 9 months - so unless you kill the moss it's pointless

hotchy

2,574 posts

87 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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Moss caused a leak in my dads garage. The moss was pretty bad, I suppose some had grown under the tiles or moved some but it held the water and then the garage would drip for a day until the moss had dried. Cleaned it off and never a leak since.

Milkbuttons

877 posts

123 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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I have a 1950s property with lots of trees around the house and I actually think the moss gives my house more character, I prefer the look of the house with the moss on.

rufmeister

1,057 posts

83 months

Wednesday 28th October 2020
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V8RX7 said:
I'm surrounded by big trees

When I was replacing a bay roof I gave it a quick sweep with a stiff brush

It looked the same within 9 months - so unless you kill the moss it's pointless
Correct. Using a professional grade biocide should see it moss free for around 5 years.

A lot of people choose roof cleaning for an aesthetic look, but its main purpose is to clear the roof from moss, which freezes and expands in the winter, cracking tiles, which can lead to water ingress.



sal 965

558 posts

172 months

Friday 30th October 2020
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Wacky Racer said:
I did mine myself, but I am fortunate to have some very good industrial ladders and roof ladders. It came off fairly easily with a stiff brush, I just let it all slide into the gutter and then cleaned the gutter out (Taking care to block the drain at the bottom of the downspout so moss would not get in there.)

That lot took about a day to shift.

The roof looks like new now, but it's not a job for anyone without a head for heights.

Our next house will be a bungalow...smile

Are you in Rossendale? Those hills look familiar wink

Welshbeef

42,872 posts

159 months

Friday 30th October 2020
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Surely if it’s not blocking the guttering / valley.

A few on our street have done it to 70 year old tiles.
Patchy is an understatement

When they did our neighbours - the guys who did it asked could they use the few spare original tiles I had near the shed over them using brand new as it would look odd. Um... I’ve spares,8 as it happens for the very same reason on my roof + as I pointed out to them 2 have broken so 2 will go in there and no doubt others may break getting up to replace them. The roofer seemed a bit miffed/to the point I suspect he would have lent over and “borrowed” the tiles if I were not out in the garden.

Boosted LS1

19,550 posts

221 months

Friday 30th October 2020
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Mazinbrum said:
peterperkins said:
I look on roof moss as a free extra layer of naturally accumulating insulation and tile protection.

Presumably if you left it long enough the house would turn into one of those subterranean earth houses with a delicious peaty topping.
The trouble is a lot of moss seems to end up on our patio, I’m thinking about the copper strip but I’m not getting up there myself.
Moss on the roof is fab if it's not causing damage. Surely it's not much effort to sweep the patio sometimes? We need more greenery to encourage insects and wildlife.

RichB

44,364 posts

245 months

Friday 30th October 2020
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Boosted LS1 said:
Mazinbrum said:
peterperkins said:
I look on roof moss as a free extra layer of naturally accumulating insulation and tile protection. Presumably if you left it long enough the house would turn into one of those subterranean earth houses with a delicious peaty topping.
The trouble is a lot of moss seems to end up on our patio, I’m thinking about the copper strip but I’m not getting up there myself.
Moss on the roof is fab if it's not causing damage. Surely it's not much effort to sweep the patio sometimes? We need more greenery to encourage insects and wildlife.
The crows, jays and magpies graze on my roof but I've always wondered how little worms and stuff get up there and into the moss? confused

Boosted LS1

19,550 posts

221 months

Friday 30th October 2020
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You'd be amazed how wildlife can travel. For instance I have a fish pond with a raised wall. In theory it's isolated from the 'wild' world yet I find shimp like creatures in the filters. The pond gets filled with rain water and tap water. No bird can stand in it. Herons can stand on the wall though and reach downwards. I find worms in the roof gutters of my victorian house. It's astonishing how nature can thrive if we cut it some slack.

I have a tiny concrete yard by my pond. I let it run wild this year and it's almost a jungle. The amount of life that's there is epic and that draws in birds as well. I'll have to tidy it up as autumn progresses but shall still leave the stuff on the floor for the blackbirds to turn over.