2021 Lawn thread

2021 Lawn thread

Author
Discussion

markiii

1,813 posts

162 months

Monday 8th February
quotequote all
how do

505diff

Original Poster:

475 posts

211 months

Monday 8th February
quotequote all
Just ordered this fellow with handle

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/8TcAAMXQoYJSJeED/s-...

This will sink in well in a veg patch or border, but when I tried one I found in my mums shed on her lawn, it made slots about 10-15 mm deep with out churning up the edges, so will hopefully make the ideal bed for over seeding, giving seed good soil contact and moisture and hide them from the birds, worth a punt for £45

Which is fair bit cheaper than this at £250

https://www.bmsproducts.com/wp-content/uploads/201...




Chuffedmonkey

648 posts

74 months

Monday 8th February
quotequote all
What time of the year would be advisable to lay turf? Iv had the lawn area flattened and it now requires top soil and turf laid. Iv contacted a few garden centers/suppliers who have gave lead times on turf to be around beginning/mid March.

I would like to get the garden right so any advice would be welcome. Thanks

dhutch

8,502 posts

165 months

Monday 8th February
quotequote all
Chuffedmonkey said:
What time of the year would be advisable to lay turf?

Iv contacted a few garden centers/suppliers who have gave lead times on turf to be around beginning/mid March.
Not an expert in turf but these are two good sources for guides, which suggests autumn through to early spring. I expect at the moment it's far too wet to lift turf, hence the stock shortage. So as soon at it comes in I would suggest.

In the meantime a months settling isn't a bad thing and will allow you to re-level and settlement before turfing.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=410

https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/lawn-care-advice/creat...


Daniel

ChocolateFrog

13,368 posts

141 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
Will have another go at mine this year.

It's a losing battle though I fear. Relatively small area combined with some unavoidable dog mess means I'm never going to have a perfect lawn.

ChocolateFrog

13,368 posts

141 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
dhutch said:
Chuffedmonkey said:
What time of the year would be advisable to lay turf?

Iv contacted a few garden centers/suppliers who have gave lead times on turf to be around beginning/mid March.
Not an expert in turf but these are two good sources for guides, which suggests autumn through to early spring. I expect at the moment it's far too wet to lift turf, hence the stock shortage. So as soon at it comes in I would suggest.

In the meantime a months settling isn't a bad thing and will allow you to re-level and settlement before turfing.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=410

https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/lawn-care-advice/creat...


Daniel
I'd echo that. Based on my experience you get quite a lot of settling. If I was doing it again I'd roller the soil before laying the turf.

RichB

45,495 posts

252 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
ChocolateFrog said:
dhutch said:
Chuffedmonkey said:
What time of the year would be advisable to lay turf?

Iv contacted a few garden centers/suppliers who have gave lead times on turf to be around beginning/mid March.
Not an expert in turf but these are two good sources for guides, which suggests autumn through to early spring. I expect at the moment it's far too wet to lift turf, hence the stock shortage. So as soon at it comes in I would suggest.

In the meantime a months settling isn't a bad thing and will allow you to re-level and settlement before turfing.
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=410
https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/lawn-care-advice/creat... Daniel
I'd echo that. Based on my experience you get quite a lot of settling. If I was doing it again I'd roller the soil before laying the turf.
Indeed, my lawn was turfed in November of 2018 and now, after 3 winters it is quite bumpy and will need levelling this spring.

AyBee

9,493 posts

170 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
Going to be involved in this thread this year. Moved into a new (to me) house in December and currently have this:
Betson said:
So I’ve dug a hole to find clay, more clay and a bit more clay, it’s still not draining after more rain last night, looks like I will have install drainage in the spring, I’m sure a few years ago the winters were not as wet.
and this:
Dave_ST220 said:
My once lush lawn is full of moss frown Going to need some serious work this year. When would you bother with killing the moss? April/May then over seed?
The moss I'll kill off before raking and seeding, but not sure how best to deal with the drainage? It floods in one specific area, just off the patio after heavy rainfall but then drains within a few hours of the rain stopping. Is hollow tining all it needs or do I need to do something more severe? Will follow up with pictures next time it rains...

Leftfootwonder

1,085 posts

26 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
ChocolateFrog said:
Will have another go at mine this year.

It's a losing battle though I fear. Relatively small area combined with some unavoidable dog mess means I'm never going to have a perfect lawn.
HTH

https://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/unw...

hehe

morfmedia

232 posts

195 months

Wednesday 10th February
quotequote all
My plan is to get some fields compost organic top dressing in, mix with some sand I need to use up which will hopefully feed the grass and level out the bumps a bit.

Also definitely need to get a hollow core aerator rented and the cores taken out to let the lawn breathe and remove some of the compaction.

Thinking about getting some Humic Acid spread out too as Robbie from his Premier Lawns Youtube channel loves the stuff and it's not too expensive.

Finally after all that get some starter fertiliser down and get the lawn overseeded, most likely with some American dark green seed at a heavy rate.

Later in the year need to possibly do some nemotode treatment as the grass seems to have died off in a few patches which aren't in the shade.

  1. LawnPlan2021

LaserTam

1,964 posts

187 months

Monday 15th February
quotequote all
I have a couple of questions.

My lawn is pretty patchy, just mud in places. Recent snow hasn't done it any favours. We have a dog and his running up and down is in part to blame I think. I want to get organised to improve it this year, so that come next winter, it should be more grass and less mud on show.

I've read that now might be a good idea to add some sand, to help with drainage. Firstly, just sand or a mixed top dressing? What type of sand should I be buying, it builders sand, sharp sand?

Once spring arrives, I will add maybe dressing, but certainly seed. Better watering through the summer and fertiliser. I can't really put the grannuals type stuff on it, because the dog will walk on it and then leave paw print stains on paths and patio. So I'm thinking a liquid feed. Any recommendations of which one? Its not a big lawn so doing this by watering can wouldn't be too hard.

Thanks.

LaserTam

1,964 posts

187 months

Tuesday 16th February
quotequote all
Nudge smile

spanner10

174 posts

15 months

Tuesday 16th February
quotequote all
The sand you want is coarse sharp sand . This has a fairly uniform grain size ( no very small grains) and feels very gritty. Contact suppliers of sand , growing mediums and top dressings to sportsgrounds . Whether you get top dressing with plenty of sand , or just sand it needs to be kept dry and is usually delivered in bulk bags. Storage can be a problem but if its dry it lasts for years. Improving lawns takes ages but does pay dividends in the end. A petrol cylinder mower makes a big difference. You could cut a piece of field twice a week at the correct length and it would soon look better than most lawns.

I use granular lawn food from Scotts 3 times a year and spot weed with what was called Verdone ( now renamed ) . I water the feed in and then the dog is ok on it . Its the moss killer ( ferrous sulphate) which mainly marks slabs, so lawn food without moss killer avoids most of this risk.
url]|https://thumbsnap.com/jfk4UXNi[/url]

I would wait until ground has dried out and grass is growing before doing any work. In order ,mow , spike ( hollow core or with garden fork ) sand , feed, seed patches ( April ) or turf with best turf you can get ( March ) . Then mow as often as possible keeping length of grass steady . Lawn pictured is cut about every 5 days spring and autumn, at least twice a week in summer about 12mm which keeps it green in dry spells, watered thoroughly if needed. I have tried 8 mm in the past but just too much work to keep it looking ok

Edited by spanner10 on Tuesday 16th February 19:49

LaserTam

1,964 posts

187 months

Tuesday 16th February
quotequote all
Thanks for the info

snowman99

246 posts

115 months

Tuesday 16th February
quotequote all
I have a lawn on clay. It will need some smoothing out as walking on it in winter as made some indentations and bare patches.

Would it be best to spike and brush in compost or cans or a mix of both? There was a patch I filled in mostly with compost and it was very green last summer - the problem is the clay dries out hard and the grass struggles. Without digging it up I want to improve the soil a bit - my theory was to brush 1cm or 2cm worth of compost in plus spiking.

Some Googling suggests compost may be better than a little sand. Plus maybe some gypsum?

Edited by snowman99 on Tuesday 16th February 22:59

dhutch

8,502 posts

165 months

Wednesday 17th February
quotequote all
dhutch said:
TLDR:

What time of year is hollow tining best done, and can you combine with scarification?

Background:

Having scarifed in order to topdress and re-seed last spring and then missed it due to the super dry April we had, so I'm planning to try again this spring!

Lawn is flat, ok, but a lot of course grasses, moss, thatch from years of abuse. Plus the main section doesn't match a new extended section which is much nicer!
Lots of mature trees around too, hence not reseeding at the end of the year. Soil is in reasonable condition I think but thin. Sandstone bedrock about 6inch below. Havn't done a ph test.

Can I hollow time at the same time as scarificating, then topdress and overseed, in around the start April once it's warm enough. Thinking of quite a heavy go over, good thick dress in some 1" deep hollows, then seed.

Hit it with ferrous sulphate last week for the moss.
Any thoughts on the above?

morfmedia

232 posts

195 months

Wednesday 17th February
quotequote all
dhutch said:
Any thoughts on the above?
Have a look on youtube @ Premier Lawns (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCatgfCe7ywHXZXspps6JQbQ)

He's done some great videos on scarifying, aerating & overseeding etc. I think March / April seems to be the best time for hollow tine aeration, that's what I'm targeting weather dependant.

Humpy D

503 posts

163 months

Wednesday 17th February
quotequote all
I have a fairly small lawn (c.40 sq m?) but it contains 3 mature trees, a tall silver birch, a plum and an apple tree. Aside from being a pain disposing of the fruit the plum and apple produce (yes, we do eat some but so do the maggots!!) the lawn suffers from poor growth under these trees, a combination of lack of sunlight and air and I suspect the trees taking any moisture and goodness. This winter has highlighted this more than ever with the area under the apple tree in particular being 80% mud. And what is also annoying is that I try to look after my grass iro cutting, feeding, raking, etc and yet my lawn is significantly worse than all the neighbours who just run the mower over theirs once a fortnight!! I am therefore seriously considering removing the plum and apple but not the silver birch as the lowest branches of this tree are at least 10 foot above ground level.

Just wanted to hear from anyone who had a similar dilemma and removed trees and whether this made a significant difference in the health of the lawn.

Thanks.

r44flyer

343 posts

184 months

Saturday 20th February
quotequote all
Hello all...
Like most of the UK we've had a lot of rain recently which has highlighted seemingly poor drainage in our lawn. It's not really bad, it doesn't pool, it's just squelchy all the time and has thinned a good deal over the winter which suggests to me it is too waterlogged.

I want to amend the soil as best I can without tearing it up, and so far my plan is to hollow tine every few inches (manually, it's only 100sqm) and brush something appropriate into the holes and a quarter inch on top. The internet seems to default to sand for this purpose bit given we have a lot of clay round here I'm conscious I may turn the lawn into a concrete slab adding sand (most likely a dried 70/30 dressing mix). The other option is the Fields 4mm fine compost, which I've used before as a dressing and it's great stuff, but not sure if it provide what I want it to do drainage wise.

What do we think is the best way to go?

morfmedia

232 posts

195 months

Sunday 21st February
quotequote all
r44flyer said:
What do we think is the best way to go?
No expert here but as you say you need to get organic matter down to the root zone and below. Sand might help with the drainage but with a clay soil isn't ideal. Worth looking at getting some clay breaker / gypsum type material in the holes?

I'd get as much fields number fine stuff on as possible as that will get pulled down over time.

I managed to get a cheeky mow in yesterday and lay down some stripes. Also finally got round to getting my LawnSmith Winter green down, probably a bit late really but I wanted to use it up as it's been sitting for ages in the way.

I've got 20KG of Hurrels All American Dark Green seed en route, gonna wait till March / April and try and aerate, top dress with some of that fields fine stuff and get a ton of overseeding done. Might break it up into quarters as it's about 375 Sq/M and I can't be bothered to mess around moving the sprinkler all the time.



It looks better than it is up close, I think Harry Flashman sent me some of his squirrels as I've had 3 or 4 of them go mental on my lawn constantly digging and burying their food.... SW London so it's been toasty warm this weekend.