Things you always wanted to know the answer to [Vol. 4]

Things you always wanted to know the answer to [Vol. 4]

Author
Discussion

StevieBee

7,125 posts

193 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Brother D said:
Organ transplants.

If a heart comes from someone with same blood type as the recipient (and cleaned) - how does the recipients body know that it's not the same heart that was there a few hours ago? I would have thought a heart muscle cell is the same as everyone else's? Same for fat cells etc - so does that mean everyone has unique cells? And what gets attacked when the recipient's body rejects the organ - is it across the board or only particular parts/cells?
I think it's to do with DNA. The body attacks the cells containing DNA it doesn't recognise as its own.

How it works with blood transfusions I don't know!

Flibble

4,473 posts

119 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
StevieBee said:
Brother D said:
Organ transplants.

If a heart comes from someone with same blood type as the recipient (and cleaned) - how does the recipients body know that it's not the same heart that was there a few hours ago? I would have thought a heart muscle cell is the same as everyone else's? Same for fat cells etc - so does that mean everyone has unique cells? And what gets attacked when the recipient's body rejects the organ - is it across the board or only particular parts/cells?
I think it's to do with DNA. The body attacks the cells containing DNA it doesn't recognise as its own.

How it works with blood transfusions I don't know!
It's antibodies. They are meant to detect foreign cells like bacteria and viruses and kill them. Unless the heart is from a very close relative it won't have the same antibodies so the body attacks it as a disease.

I suppose in a sense it's DNA as it's DNA that determines which antibodies are made.

popeyewhite

8,491 posts

58 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
StevieBee said:
Brother D said:
Organ transplants.

If a heart comes from someone with same blood type as the recipient (and cleaned) - how does the recipients body know that it's not the same heart that was there a few hours ago? I would have thought a heart muscle cell is the same as everyone else's? Same for fat cells etc - so does that mean everyone has unique cells? And what gets attacked when the recipient's body rejects the organ - is it across the board or only particular parts/cells?
I think it's to do with DNA. The body attacks the cells containing DNA it doesn't recognise as its own.

How it works with blood transfusions I don't know!
I think the patient takes a cocktail of drugs to aid new organ acceptance.

Clockwork Cupcake

58,615 posts

210 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
popeyewhite said:
I think the patient takes a cocktail of drugs to aid new organ acceptance.
And often stay on a regime of immunosuppressants indefinitely.

OpulentBob

10,428 posts

118 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
Why do I feel queasy (and sometimes faint) at gore, blood, descriptions of surgery etc?

I grew up shooting. I have killed and gutted/plucked/skinned many things. I have cut my own leg down to the bone and wrapped it up with gaffer tape because I was busy working. I have been stabbed (not deliberately) in the eye and driven myself to hospital whilst barely able to see.

Yet the thought of organ donation, the sight of an autopsy on Silent Witness, my friend describing her broken leg and operation, all make me feel sick. Twice I've fainted, luckily whilst sitting down. What is it about other people's squidgy pulsating bits that completely disables me?
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paua

977 posts

81 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
OpulentBob said:
Why do I feel queasy (and sometimes faint) at gore, blood, descriptions of surgery etc?

I grew up shooting. I have killed and gutted/plucked/skinned many things. I have cut my own leg down to the bone and wrapped it up with gaffer tape because I was busy working. I have been stabbed (not deliberately) in the eye and driven myself to hospital whilst barely able to see.

Yet the thought of organ donation, the sight of an autopsy on Silent Witness, my friend describing her broken leg and operation, all make me feel sick. Twice I've fainted, luckily whilst sitting down. What is it about other people's squidgy pulsating bits that completely disables me?
Other people's pulsating squidgy bits are sexy. Harden the fk up.

Probably not what you had in mind... wink

Flibble

4,473 posts

119 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
StevieBee said:
How it works with blood transfusions I don't know!
Incidentally blood works becasue there are fewer antibodies, so it's easier to get a match that the body will accept. The main ones are the ABO blood group and Rh type, but there are many more than that. Also type O blood has no AB antibodies at all, which means it will work with any ABO type because there's nothing "foreign" for the host to react to.

Also often they separate out the red blood cells which increases the quality of match as there are fewer cell types to match then.

captain_cynic

4,095 posts

33 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
theplayingmantis said:
glazbagun said:
On an equine theme, do riot police and their horses have any link to the cavalry of old, or have police horses always been civil in nature?
cavalry chargers of old were way stockier than police horses. proper units, think suffolk punch type, sort of. so i guess not, but may be wrong. but not my field of equine experience.
This has made me wonder, how many horse breeds have died out since we've stopped using them as the main form of transport?

theplayingmantis

1,680 posts

20 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
captain_cynic said:
theplayingmantis said:
glazbagun said:
On an equine theme, do riot police and their horses have any link to the cavalry of old, or have police horses always been civil in nature?
cavalry chargers of old were way stockier than police horses. proper units, think suffolk punch type, sort of. so i guess not, but may be wrong. but not my field of equine experience.
This has made me wonder, how many horse breeds have died out since we've stopped using them as the main form of transport?
Lots probably, much like certain hunting dogs like the once ubiquitous Talbot.

Europa1

7,492 posts

126 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
Clockwork Cupcake said:
popeyewhite said:
I think the patient takes a cocktail of drugs to aid new organ acceptance.
And often stay on a regime of immunosuppressants indefinitely.
Indeed. As I understand it (hopefully I'll find out before too much longer) there is a cocktail of immunosuppressants, plus a cocktail of drugs to counter the side-effects of the immunosuppressants, and a cocktail of drugs to counter the side effects of that cocktail. As it was explained to me, the patient is swapping one set of symptoms for another.

Clockwork Cupcake

58,615 posts

210 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
Europa1 said:
Indeed. As I understand it (hopefully I'll find out before too much longer) there is a cocktail of immunosuppressants, plus a cocktail of drugs to counter the side-effects of the immunosuppressants, and a cocktail of drugs to counter the side effects of that cocktail. As it was explained to me, the patient is swapping one set of symptoms for another.
Yes. My father is in this situation ever since he had a kidney transplant.


SpeckledJim

17,207 posts

191 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
Europa1 said:
Clockwork Cupcake said:
popeyewhite said:
I think the patient takes a cocktail of drugs to aid new organ acceptance.
And often stay on a regime of immunosuppressants indefinitely.
Indeed. As I understand it (hopefully I'll find out before too much longer) there is a cocktail of immunosuppressants, plus a cocktail of drugs to counter the side-effects of the immunosuppressants, and a cocktail of drugs to counter the side effects of that cocktail. As it was explained to me, the patient is swapping one set of symptoms for another.
My granddad was, at 87, on a huge combination of drugs but was maintaining a very good standard of living. Active, busy and happy.

One of the drugs he was on was apparently to do something about his swollen feet. His feet had stopped swelling, so he stopped taking that drug, and didn't tell anyone. Thought nothing of it.

What he hadn't understood was that without that particular drug, all the rest of the drugs were badly out of balance, and were quickly poisoning him.

Dead from multiple organ failure inside two weeks. All from that one small, simple mistake.

Exige77

3,214 posts

129 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
OpulentBob said:
Why do I feel queasy (and sometimes faint) at gore, blood, descriptions of surgery etc?

I grew up shooting. I have killed and gutted/plucked/skinned many things. I have cut my own leg down to the bone and wrapped it up with gaffer tape because I was busy working. I have been stabbed (not deliberately) in the eye and driven myself to hospital whilst barely able to see.

Yet the thought of organ donation, the sight of an autopsy on Silent Witness, my friend describing her broken leg and operation, all make me feel sick. Twice I've fainted, luckily whilst sitting down. What is it about other people's squidgy pulsating bits that completely disables me?
My daughter had a case a couple of weeks ago. Teenager hung him self. Ambulance crew had managed to get his heart going and to nearest hospital. Unfortunately his brain was severely damaged and after a few days it was decided it was a no go.

He had an organ donor card and his family also agreed to salvage what they could. Apart from his issue, he was fit, healthy and young. He needed to be kept alive until all the various recipients where ready. This was in Surrey and recipients where all over including heart recipient in Birmingham.

Ambulance bikers where on standby. Several surgical teams where ready to go. First surgical team went in. Normally, as you can imagine, they do stuff carefully and limit the damage but in this case they just removed the whole front of his torso so the various teams could get in and remove their various parts as quickly as possible and send them to the various waiting recipients.

The organ harvesting surgery is very different from regular surgery. I’m very happy I didn’t have to witness it. I’m with Opulant Bob.


Jonboy_t

4,271 posts

121 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
I’ve never used one so it may be a slightly ignorant question, but why do gamers need the tv screen on when they’re playing on one of the virtual reality headsets? I’ve got a few friends who have them and I’ve only ever seen them playing on it with the game on the screen too.

kowalski655

7,906 posts

81 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
Jonboy_t said:
I’ve never used one so it may be a slightly ignorant question, but why do gamers need the tv screen on when they’re playing on one of the virtual reality headsets? I’ve got a few friends who have them and I’ve only ever seen them playing on it with the game on the screen too.
Usually to see to load up the game before going into VR. Also lets others watch you play(best not done when playing Virtual Girlfriend VR eek *) or make a prat of yourself.
The graphics card outputs to both screen & VR (on PC at least)so will mirror it, and its not worth the hassle turning it off

* NSFW if you google it!

kowalski655

7,906 posts

81 months

Tuesday 12th February
quotequote all
theplayingmantis said:
glazbagun said:
On an equine theme, do riot police and their horses have any link to the cavalry of old, or have police horses always been civil in nature?
cavalry chargers of old were way stockier than police horses. proper units, think suffolk punch type, sort of. so i guess not, but may be wrong. but not my field of equine experience.
Certainly for schock(Heavy) cavalry, as they would charge into contact whereas Light Cavalry(Hussars, Uhlans,etc) would use smaller faster horses for scouting

Huntsman

6,470 posts

188 months

Wednesday 13th February
quotequote all
Trojan Records got its name from Duke Reid's Trojan van in Jamaica, does anyone know what model of Trojan van it was?

Exige77

3,214 posts

129 months

Thursday 14th February
quotequote all
Exige77 said:
OpulentBob said:
Why do I feel queasy (and sometimes faint) at gore, blood, descriptions of surgery etc?

I grew up shooting. I have killed and gutted/plucked/skinned many things. I have cut my own leg down to the bone and wrapped it up with gaffer tape because I was busy working. I have been stabbed (not deliberately) in the eye and driven myself to hospital whilst barely able to see.

Yet the thought of organ donation, the sight of an autopsy on Silent Witness, my friend describing her broken leg and operation, all make me feel sick. Twice I've fainted, luckily whilst sitting down. What is it about other people's squidgy pulsating bits that completely disables me?
My daughter had a case a couple of weeks ago. Teenager hung him self. Ambulance crew had managed to get his heart going and to nearest hospital. Unfortunately his brain was severely damaged and after a few days it was decided it was a no go.

He had an organ donor card and his family also agreed to salvage what they could. Apart from his issue, he was fit, healthy and young. He needed to be kept alive until all the various recipients where ready. This was in Surrey and recipients where all over including heart recipient in Birmingham.

Ambulance bikers where on standby. Several surgical teams where ready to go. First surgical team went in. Normally, as you can imagine, they do stuff carefully and limit the damage but in this case they just removed the whole front of his torso so the various teams could get in and remove their various parts as quickly as possible and send them to the various waiting recipients.

The organ harvesting surgery is very different from regular surgery. I’m very happy I didn’t have to witness it. I’m with Opulant Bob.
Just an update if anyone is interested (proud Dad moment)

My daughter just had a letter from the NHS transplant service thanking her for her assistance with the transplant and wanted to her her know what happened to the donated organs:

A gentlemen in his 40s received a kidney after a twelve year wait for a match.

A gentleman in his 60s received a kidney after a 7 year wait for a match.

A lady in her 40s received a pancreas after a 2 month wait.

The liver was split and part was given to a gentlemen and part to a baby boy. A small unused part was placed into a research programme.

A gentlemen in his 40s was given a life saving heart transplant.

Rather humbling and well worth doing.

OpulentBob

10,428 posts

118 months

Thursday 14th February
quotequote all
Absolutely. Bravo.

FredericRobinson

1,587 posts

170 months

Friday 15th February
quotequote all
Can you register a child in the UK under a surname other than that of either parent, eg under the Icelandic '-son' system?