The misery of lower back pain

The misery of lower back pain

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Discussion

Silverage

Original Poster:

1,288 posts

101 months

Thursday 22nd July
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I had this come on a couple of weeks ago and I’m struggling to shift it. I’m almost 56 and everything seems to take a lot longer to recover from injury these days, so I’m not particularly worried about that.

I think it started after a weekend of furniture assembly, disassembly and general carting about. I’m praying it’s muscular rather than I’ve done my back itself. I think the gradual way it came on and the quite broad area it covers indicate it is. I’m having to take Ibuprofen to knock the pain back, which it does reasonably well. Yesterday I got some Deep Heat heat pads which I’m using on the affected area. Other than waiting (hoping) for nature to take its course, I’m doing some gentle stretching exercises a few times a day.

Does anyone with more experience of this have any comments or tips for me?

DE1975

224 posts

77 months

Thursday 22nd July
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When I've had some lower back pain in the past, I have found a foam roller has sorted it out for me. Deep heat and the like did nothing

One thing I learned, was that the pain which manifests in the lower back could actually result from other areas and using the foam roller on areas around the back as well as the glutes really helped me.

otolith

46,409 posts

175 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Based on recent experience of getting this for the first time at 48; Ibuprofen is good if your stomach tolerates it. Otherwise paracetamol. Over the counter paracetamol and codeine if they don’t touch the sides. Try to keep active, don’t sit still for too long, and some yoga type stretches really help relieve it for a while.

illmonkey

14,650 posts

169 months

Thursday 22nd July
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I suffer from a bad lower back, I crawl under cars a fair bit, but sit at a desk for my work. Recently laid 45sqM of patio and it never felt better! All the movement and physical work seemed to sort it out a bit. Within a few weeks it was back to being painful. My chiropractor sold me some biofreeze gel, several chiropractor's told me you need to cool it, not warm it. So ice pack etc. This biofreeze does the same as an ice pack, it's just easier.

Do you get pains else where? Could actually be something else.

Johnnytheboy

23,323 posts

157 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Over the counter Cocodamol (or prescription in my case) but only take when you need it.

I was quite anti painkillers as I thought it was just masking the problem, but actually it really stops the back getting worse, as your muscles relax.


Fast and Spurious

769 posts

59 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Silverage said:
I had this come on a couple of weeks ago and I’m struggling to shift it. I’m almost 56 and everything seems to take a lot longer to recover from injury these days, so I’m not particularly worried about that.

I think it started after a weekend of furniture assembly, disassembly and general carting about. I’m praying it’s muscular rather than I’ve done my back itself. I think the gradual way it came on and the quite broad area it covers indicate it is. I’m having to take Ibuprofen to knock the pain back, which it does reasonably well. Yesterday I got some Deep Heat heat pads which I’m using on the affected area. Other than waiting (hoping) for nature to take its course, I’m doing some gentle stretching exercises a few times a day.

Does anyone with more experience of this have any comments or tips for me?
Deep freeze gel is okay, but seriously get to a chiropractor, just one or two session may make all the difference plus they will recommend a series of exercises for you to do in the future. Could be the best £80 you've ever spent. It was for me...

Silverage

Original Poster:

1,288 posts

101 months

Thursday 22nd July
quotequote all
otolith said:
Based on recent experience of getting this for the first time at 48; Ibuprofen is good if your stomach tolerates it. Otherwise paracetamol. Over the counter paracetamol and codeine if they don’t touch the sides. Try to keep active, don’t sit still for too long, and some yoga type stretches really help relieve it for a while.
I don’t have any problems with the Ibuprofen and it does almost eliminate the pain. As you say, I find if I’m stood, sat upright or moving around, it’s fine, it’s just extended periods of lounging about, say watching TV with my feet up, or being in bed that causes me to “seize up”.

I don’t really want to be taking any painkillers, no matter how mild, on a regular basis, so I’ll give it another week and if things haven’t improved seek out a chiropractor I think.

RizzoTheRat

21,551 posts

163 months

Thursday 22nd July
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I used to see an osteopath every few months and it was amazing the areas he'd dig in to that weren't near where my back hurt and yet made a huge difference.

Since I started running I've had a lot less back trouble, presumably due to strengthening my core muscles. I also started doing a bit of yoga as well which helped, but not been doing it since covid as the local studio was closed and I couldn't be bothered with getting up at 6am to go to thier beach yoga sessions.

fiatpower

2,061 posts

142 months

Thursday 22nd July
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No amount of drugs, stretches or hot/cold treatment did anything for me. I'd personally recommend a chriopractor and circuit training. I used to have alot of issues with my back even at a young age but circuit training strengthened my core and back muscles. I don't really get many issues now. If I get the odd flare up a couple of sessions at the chiropractor usually gets it back under control for me.


gifdy

1,986 posts

212 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Fast and Spurious said:
Silverage said:
I had this come on a couple of weeks ago and I’m struggling to shift it. I’m almost 56 and everything seems to take a lot longer to recover from injury these days, so I’m not particularly worried about that.

I think it started after a weekend of furniture assembly, disassembly and general carting about. I’m praying it’s muscular rather than I’ve done my back itself. I think the gradual way it came on and the quite broad area it covers indicate it is. I’m having to take Ibuprofen to knock the pain back, which it does reasonably well. Yesterday I got some Deep Heat heat pads which I’m using on the affected area. Other than waiting (hoping) for nature to take its course, I’m doing some gentle stretching exercises a few times a day.

Does anyone with more experience of this have any comments or tips for me?
Deep freeze gel is okay, but seriously get to a chiropractor, just one or two session may make all the difference plus they will recommend a series of exercises for you to do in the future. Could be the best £80 you've ever spent. It was for me...
For balance, having tried a chiropractor in the past for a chronic bad back, I would never go again and would never recommend this to anyone. I'm sure experiences differ, but I was made seriously worse and it took me nearly a year to get back to where I was. I don't think all back pain responds well to what can be fairly a fairly traumatic experience for a sensitive back which really needs ice and rest.

When my back goes I found there are several stages:

- Intitial sharp pains with any movement. My back goes into spasm when pulled so lots of ice, rest and co-codemol to get through this part. Whn it's been really bad, diazapam has been great smile Lying on your back with a pillow under my knees gives me relief. This stage can last 1-2 days to up to a week.
- Once the sharp pains die down, I'm left with constant ache. I try not to take too many drugs but nurofen and topical gels like ibuleave and voltarol help. It's also important to get moving and not to sit for too long. I have some gentle pilates exercises I do to start getting it going again. At this stage, a hot bath can help
- Once the aching starts to go, I drop all drugs and get moving a lot more. Stepping up the pilates and weirdly going out for a few cycles helps a lot. I think a lot of my pain originates from my hips and for some reason cycling helps. The best exercise is skiing but that's a bit tricky when the weather is like this !

Best set of exercises I've ever found are in this book : Back Rx

They have the exercise in different stages which you build through as you get better. I've been to several physios/doctors etc and they all recommend the same exercises so you could save a few pennies if you jsut get the book and work you way through it.

Good luck - back pain can be horrible to live with.



Four Litre

1,617 posts

163 months

Thursday 22nd July
quotequote all
Ice, Ice and more ice to reduce inflammation.

Sadly I have had 25+ years of lower back pain following an incident with a bag of cement!

LunarOne

2,532 posts

108 months

Thursday 22nd July
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When we talk about lower back pain, are we all talking about the same thing? Are we talking about a continuous pain, pain when bending or standing, or pain associated with spasms?

About 3 months ago I started feeling twinges and spasms in my lower right back, but only when I'm trying to get up from a chair or get out of bed. When I'm walking, I get the odd spasm if I mis-step, for example when there's a bit of a hole on the golf course or if I walk over a kerb without seeing it's there. Some of these spasms are so painful that I literally can't get out of bed or out of my chair, but 99% of the time I don't feel any pain at all. Is this the same back pain you're talking about? I'm 46 and quite overweight.

Johnnytheboy

23,323 posts

157 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Chiropractors and Osteopaths are various shades of alternative medicine woo.

Go to a physiotherapist instead.

Silverage

Original Poster:

1,288 posts

101 months

Thursday 22nd July
quotequote all
LunarOne said:
When we talk about lower back pain, are we all talking about the same thing? Are we talking about a continuous pain, pain when bending or standing, or pain associated with spasms?

About 3 months ago I started feeling twinges and spasms in my lower right back, but only when I'm trying to get up from a chair or get out of bed. When I'm walking, I get the odd spasm if I mis-step, for example when there's a bit of a hole on the golf course or if I walk over a kerb without seeing it's there. Some of these spasms are so painful that I literally can't get out of bed or out of my chair, but 99% of the time I don't feel any pain at all. Is this the same back pain you're talking about? I'm 46 and quite overweight.
This is EXACTLY what I’m experiencing, right down to the misstep thing. If I cough too “deeply” or sneeze, that can set it off too. As I said, I’m 55 and probably a little overweight if I’m being honest.

Das speck

408 posts

137 months

Thursday 22nd July
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I get lower back pain on occasions going from sitting to standing -

I got one of these years ago and it really really helps with injuries and stuff, you can use it while watching tv or in bed.

It’s gets me out of trouble on long haul flights (so does vodka)

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Acekool-Tens-Machine-Po...

smn159

8,772 posts

188 months

Thursday 22nd July
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The stuff already mentioned will help with the immediate symptoms, but it's likely that you have a weak core that is not adequately supporting your lower back. Longer term that is what you need to fix.

Look for running specific core workouts, even if you have no intention of actually running - Run Smart Online's Base 6 programme is excellent and will definitely help, although you'll need to invest £85 (they do have a 2 week free trial to see if you like it)

The Transform your running 30 day challenge is apparently good too and free.

Wombat3

10,272 posts

177 months

Thursday 22nd July
quotequote all
You need to find out what's causing it - you may have systemic damage to disks etc which will be more difficult to manage but like many things can be helped by the right stretching & exercise to build up muscles to support the area concerned.

I had issues with my upper back in my 20s (vertebra being locked together) which meant that part of my back wasn't doing its fair share of the work.

Net result: lower back pain. It was freed up by manipulation (Osteopath) & then everything balanced out.

The other common one which can result in pain in the lower back , down your leg and (believe it or not) sore nuts is a trapped Sciatic nerve. Usually eased by lying on the floor with a tennis ball under the most painful spot you can find (at the back of your pelvis) and articulating the leg on that side (hurts like a bd if you get it in the right place but does the job!).





smn159

8,772 posts

188 months

Thursday 22nd July
quotequote all
Absolutely - get it diagnosed properly as a first step

Then do the exercises and lose the weight smile

Douglas Quaid

1,474 posts

56 months

Thursday 22nd July
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Op do you deadlift regularly?

Nico Adie

459 posts

14 months

Thursday 22nd July
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I used to suffer from horrific back pain, so bad at times that I'd vomit. A friend recommended The Mindbody Prescription by Dr John Sarno and, no word of a lie, since reading it I've never suffered back pain again. I've recommended it to many friends and family and those who took the time to read it have said the same. It's amazing!

ETA - It would be no exaggeration whatsoever to say that this book changed my life.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mind-Body-Prescription-Jo...


Edited by Nico Adie on Thursday 22 July 14:57