SpaceX Tuesday...

SpaceX Tuesday...

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14

1,650 posts

127 months

Tuesday 11th May
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GTO-3R said:
I thought they would take it back to the high bay first to check the welds etc before going again but that’s not the SpaceX way is it biggrin

I’m assuming there wouldn’t need to be another static fire again?
I doubt a visual inspection would tell them much, as they will of gathered a lot of data from all the sensors. Things like welds they would already know, as that will be one of the reasons for the pressure testing that they do.

MartG

18,001 posts

170 months

Wednesday 12th May
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I'd guess a static fire will take place if they need to swap engines

annodomini2

6,237 posts

217 months

Wednesday 12th May
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They would probably SF anyway, even if they don't replace engines.

They do it with F9s before reflying them.

They don't have data on previously flown engines with the Raptor.

Beati Dogu

7,463 posts

105 months

Wednesday 12th May
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Impressive timelapse footage of the recent Crew-2 Dragon & ISS docking:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKYUgV6ttUg&t=...

RizzoTheRat

20,770 posts

158 months

Wednesday 12th May
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I love the wiggle before the final approach, is that it fine tuning to a specific position or do they test all the thrusters before the final docking manouvre?

Beati Dogu

7,463 posts

105 months

Wednesday 12th May
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Just fine tuning I think. I believe that was an automated approach. Note the other Dragon docked "nose down" as this one approaches the port.


Here's a rather dramatic time lapse of a Soyuz docking with the ISS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-pUVSLeUvc


Or a slower, more hi-res version of the same:

https://youtu.be/fnb3PXBkay0

Talksteer

3,644 posts

199 months

Wednesday 12th May
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Dog Star said:
MartG said:
ULA are actually at something of a disadvantage - while ESA & Roscosmos are state funded, ULA have to keep the gravy rolling in for their shareholders, and R&D on a recoverable booster would eat into profits
It'd be interesting to see where we would be in let's say 2040 if SpaceX never arrived and kicked this whole industry up the arse? I suspect we would still have the bulk of transport being done on 80 year old tech Soyuz clones, with the odd halo mission - at eye watering cost - being done on SLS (if it was finished). Compare this with a fair estimate of current advances which will see boots on Mars about 2030 (I don't think we will ever see a city there). decent sized moon base and orbiting workshops.
I think it would have all happened just slightly slower, the technology, the methods and market were there just waiting for someone to pick it up.

The COTS contract that SpaceX won was there specifically to try to make something like SpaceX happen, the Kistler K1 who won the other competition but failed on funding was actually more advanced than the Falcon 9 being fully reusable.

If we hadn't got SpaceX then we'd probably have Sierra Nevada beat Boeing to the ISS with Dreamchaser. Somebody else would have commercialized the NASA Fastrack engine just like SpaceX did with the Merlin.

See participants for NASA COTS, if SpaceX hadn't won somebody else would have got funded.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_Orbital_T...

MartG

18,001 posts

170 months

Thursday 13th May
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Robert Zubrin article about Starship

https://nautil.us/issue/100/outsiders/the-profound...

MartG

18,001 posts

170 months

Dog Star

12,570 posts

134 months

Thursday 13th May
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MartG said:
Robert Zubrin article about Starship

https://nautil.us/issue/100/outsiders/the-profound...
Good read and a great explanation of how progress has been hobbled.

Legmaster

955 posts

173 months

Thursday 13th May
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Space X have released a short recap video of the SN15 Test




Dog Star

12,570 posts

134 months

Thursday 13th May
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The noise of these things - the almost living, breathing pre-flight sounds, then that humungous crackle of the Raptors.

Magic!

S6PNJ

4,209 posts

247 months

Thursday 13th May
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Fab! clap
Right up to the last moment of landing, it still looked to be at a 'fair' angle before it sat down fully. Might just have been a trick of the camera position or might just be 'carrying momentum' to straighten up at the last moment perhaps?

xmyph

1,573 posts

137 months

Thursday 13th May
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Interesting flight profile for the first orbital test. I did wonder how they were going to stop a Starship that broke apart during reentry falling on the US...

From Texas to Hawaii: SpaceX plans first orbital Starship test

Beati Dogu

7,463 posts

105 months

Thursday 13th May
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xmyph said:
Interesting flight profile for the first orbital test. I did wonder how they were going to stop a Starship that broke apart during reentry falling on the US...

From Texas to Hawaii: SpaceX plans first orbital Starship test
Yes, just been reading about that. The rocket would separate after 170 seconds. The booster landing in the Gulf of Mexico about 20 miles downrange. The Starship heading round the Earth and reentering about 90 minutes later over the Pacific and doing a controlled landing in the sea off the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

They did test landings like this with Falcon 9 a couple of times - before they felt able to put a landing ship underneath them.

Edit: Why Kauai? It’s home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, so no doubt they have some very sophisticated tracking equipment. They’ve worked on various rocket programs from Atlas to Titan.


Edited by Beati Dogu on Thursday 13th May 22:52

fiatpower

1,901 posts

137 months

Thursday 13th May
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I never realised that SpaceX are looking at using the Starship for Earth to Earth transport. Being able to get anywhere on earth in around 30 minutes would be simply incredible. Possibly a bit uncomfortable but no worse than Ryanair i'm sure. If they nail everything they are working on they really could be a massive company.

eharding

11,680 posts

250 months

Thursday 13th May
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fiatpower said:
I never realised that SpaceX are looking at using the Starship for Earth to Earth transport. Being able to get anywhere on earth in around 30 minutes would be simply incredible. Possibly a bit uncomfortable but no worse than Ryanair i'm sure. If they nail everything they are working on they really could be a massive company.
Not sure it would be a human-rated thing at first, or even ever, but Musk at one point was talking about $10/kg to low earth orbit with Starship scale launch economics - if they can facilitate a same-sub-day global cargo service with that as a baseline cost, fronted by the likes of UPS and Fedex, they could probably charge ten times that per kilo to the end customer. Nice little earner, probably. Small mass, high value cargo like finished semiconductors or pharmaceuticals, where the urgency is very, very high, but the cargo is not ultimately irreplaceable.

fiatpower

1,901 posts

137 months

Thursday 13th May
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At first they would do cargo I guess but after a while you have to imagine they would plan on transporting passengers. Seems a logical next step after transporting cargo assuming all goes well.

Beati Dogu

7,463 posts

105 months

Thursday 13th May
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I just don’t see it. Too scary, too unreliable, too expensive.

fiatpower

1,901 posts

137 months

Thursday 13th May
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Beati Dogu said:
I just don’t see it. Too scary, too unreliable, too expensive.
Flying was to begin with i'm sure. They wouldn't be able to do it now but if they had years of launches and hundreds of flights to perfect things then I can see it. I'd happily fly that way if it was proved out.