Making relative camber changes

Making relative camber changes

Author
Discussion

LennyM1984

Original Poster:

222 posts

28 months

Monday 26th October
quotequote all
Hi,

I'm hoping that somebody knowledgeable can sense check my logic on this...

I have a Porsche Cayman which I use for track days and weekend blasts. It is currently setup with -2.3 camber on front and -1.6 on the rear. Given that my track day season will shortly be over for the year, I was thinking of dialing back the front camber a little to ~1.8-2.0 negative.

The simple way to do this would be to take it to an alignment place but I don't really fancy paying for another 4 wheel alignment and I actually have the tools and ability to adjust camber at home. The issue I have is that I don't have a perfectly level place to do it.

So here's my thinking...

If I know the current camber values (maxed out), can I use my camber gauge (which has a "zero" function) to make relative changes on slightly uneven ground. Ie. If I want to reduce negative camber by 0.5 degrees, can I simply measure whatever it is at the wheels on the uneven ground (which will be different to the 'true' measurement) and then move each strut +0.5 degrees relative to that measurement?

Example:

True measurement = -2.3 all round
Measurement on uneven ground = -1.9 Right, -2.7 Left
Adjusted measurement on uneven ground = -1.4 right, -2.2 left
True Adjusted Measurement = -1.8 all round

I know it won't be perfect due to the fact that uneven ground will mean uneven weight distribution but I guess that it ought to be close enough. I can then just reset the toe and go on my merry way.

Does that make sense or have I overlooked something hugely important?



GreenV8S

28,506 posts

244 months

Monday 26th October
quotequote all
Make the ground flat and level by putting the appropriate thickness pads under each tyre. A few pieces of plywood should do the job nicely. A spirit level and long straight edge between the pads is all you need to measure flatness. Once the pads are level just drive the car on and sort out the geometry.

LimSlip

618 posts

14 months

Monday 26th October
quotequote all
Note that you'll have to adjust the tracking after you change the camber.

LennyM1984

Original Poster:

222 posts

28 months

Monday 26th October
quotequote all
LimSlip said:
Note that you'll have to adjust the tracking after you change the camber.
For sure. Setting the toe is a little less, 'perfectly level' dependent though