Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Author
Discussion

JonChalk

4,722 posts

77 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
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DibblyDobbler said:
+1 Just finished the trilogy - good fun and relatively straightforward stories.

I’m onto a second reading of the Void books now - nearly went for the newer Salvation books but was put off by a few negative reviews and the plot just didn’t appeal somehow.
Have the third one safely upstairs still in its Amazon packaging waiting for a special occasion to open (I may give it to my wife to give back to me as a Christmas present).

I thought the first two Salvation novels were really good. I think some may be disappointed that they aren't Void-sized, but they're all the better for it IMHO (I'm saving Void and Night's Dawn trilogies for my retirement before re-reading!).

It's always good to find authors doing/trying new styles.

captain_cynic

7,115 posts

62 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
quotequote all
JonChalk said:
DibblyDobbler said:
+1 Just finished the trilogy - good fun and relatively straightforward stories.

I’m onto a second reading of the Void books now - nearly went for the newer Salvation books but was put off by a few negative reviews and the plot just didn’t appeal somehow.
Have the third one safely upstairs still in its Amazon packaging waiting for a special occasion to open (I may give it to my wife to give back to me as a Christmas present).

I thought the first two Salvation novels were really good. I think some may be disappointed that they aren't Void-sized, but they're all the better for it IMHO (I'm saving Void and Night's Dawn trilogies for my retirement before re-reading!).

It's always good to find authors doing/trying new styles.
Just finished the second Salvation book, definitely worth the read.

Most of the negative reviews for the Salvation books have used the word "woke" and that's when you know it's utter bks. If anyone finds the concept of transgender/gender fluidity uncomfortable I'd have to say Sci-Fi is not for them. Moving on.

One of the best/worst things about Salvation is that it is Peter F Hamilton doing the same thing he did in the Pandora Star universe. Whether that's a good or a bad thing is up to you. A lot of common themes are recycled such as instantaneous transport (quantum entanglement rather than wormholes), lawful/chaotic good ultra rich people saving the universe, et al.

But don't let that put you off because Hamilton is doing what he does best, creating immersive worlds with compelling stories and Salvation is 100% true to form with this. I will say both books were slow burners for me, but worth it by the end.

Narcisus

6,294 posts

247 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
quotequote all
captain_cynic said:
JonChalk said:
DibblyDobbler said:
+1 Just finished the trilogy - good fun and relatively straightforward stories.

I’m onto a second reading of the Void books now - nearly went for the newer Salvation books but was put off by a few negative reviews and the plot just didn’t appeal somehow.
Have the third one safely upstairs still in its Amazon packaging waiting for a special occasion to open (I may give it to my wife to give back to me as a Christmas present).

I thought the first two Salvation novels were really good. I think some may be disappointed that they aren't Void-sized, but they're all the better for it IMHO (I'm saving Void and Night's Dawn trilogies for my retirement before re-reading!).

It's always good to find authors doing/trying new styles.
Just finished the second Salvation book, definitely worth the read.

Most of the negative reviews for the Salvation books have used the word "woke" and that's when you know it's utter bks. If anyone finds the concept of transgender/gender fluidity uncomfortable I'd have to say Sci-Fi is not for them. Moving on.

One of the best/worst things about Salvation is that it is Peter F Hamilton doing the same thing he did in the Pandora Star universe. Whether that's a good or a bad thing is up to you. A lot of common themes are recycled such as instantaneous transport (quantum entanglement rather than wormholes), lawful/chaotic good ultra rich people saving the universe, et al.

But don't let that put you off because Hamilton is doing what he does best, creating immersive worlds with compelling stories and Salvation is 100% true to form with this. I will say both books were slow burners for me, but worth it by the end.
I'm about 35% into the 2nd Salvation book. Cant put it down.

DibblyDobbler

10,750 posts

164 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
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Thanks Gents - will give them a go once I am through the Void series (which, by the way, I am enjoying more second time round) thumbup

Sway

19,361 posts

161 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
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DibblyDobbler said:
Thanks Gents - will give them a go once I am through the Void series (which, by the way, I am enjoying more second time round) thumbup
Void made so much more sense the second time around. First time I found it challenging to continue at points.

I'm relistening to the first Salvation, finish work for the year Thursday next week - want to have finished the trilogy by then!

JonChalk

4,722 posts

77 months

Tuesday 8th December 2020
quotequote all
captain_cynic said:
Just finished the second Salvation book, definitely worth the read.

Most of the negative reviews for the Salvation books have used the word "woke" and that's when you know it's utter bks. If anyone finds the concept of transgender/gender fluidity uncomfortable I'd have to say Sci-Fi is not for them. Moving on.

One of the best/worst things about Salvation is that it is Peter F Hamilton doing the same thing he did in the Pandora Star universe. Whether that's a good or a bad thing is up to you. A lot of common themes are recycled such as instantaneous transport (quantum entanglement rather than wormholes), lawful/chaotic good ultra rich people saving the universe, et al.

But don't let that put you off because Hamilton is doing what he does best, creating immersive worlds with compelling stories and Salvation is 100% true to form with this. I will say both books were slow burners for me, but worth it by the end.
A much more considered reply than mine. Thank you, I agree 100%.

xeny

1,882 posts

45 months

Sunday 13th December 2020
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grumbledoak said:
And now I have read A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge. He really does have a fantastic imagination: the universe is unique in it's physics, the aliens really do range widely in their physiology, into novel configurations complete with their own unique limitations. The main plot centres on a human-caused calamity, a great Evil, and a rescue of lost children. It's a decent size book but it flies by. Definitely recommended. You should probably read both in order but the plots are distinct, separated by eons.
The physics were deliberately designed to avoid having to write in a post singularity situation, in the same way that Marooned in Realtime uses the bobbles to skip over a singularity event.

In order is an interesting question. Fire was written first, but I know someone who read Deepness first and definitely enjoyed the pair. Sadly Children of the Sky isn't as captivating.

For people who where Usenet users in the 90s, there are bits of the book that are rather reminiscent. Overall I think I prefer Deepness, as I like the principal character for being so much of a polymath.

Clockwork Cupcake

66,442 posts

239 months

Saturday 19th December 2020
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I just finished the first book in the Harem Station series by JA Huss, because the first two books are free on Amazon Kindle (and the 3rd is free if you are on Kindle Unlimited), and it looked like a giggle.

It's billed as "Sci-Fi Alien Romance" and this first book (rather embarrassingly entitled "Booty Hunter") is part Pulp fiction Space Opera, part Military Sci-Fi, and part erotica / soft porn (with a little bit of BDSM thrown in for good measure). It's also quite light-hearted, and is genuinely funny in places (without being a comedy as such).

Character development is brisk but hangs together fairly well, and there is some good world building that wouldn't feel totally out of place in the Culture universe, what with aliens and also AI (both drones, ship-based, and station-based). Yet for all that, it doesn't feel "trying too hard" derivative.

Parts had me chuckling out loud, other parts were steamy enough that I got a little hot under the collar. hehe

The book is chapter-based, and written in the first person, with chapters alternating between the male protagonist and the female protagonist, which I found quite interesting.

Overall, very much a "guilty pleasure" type of book, but I found it hugely enjoyable. I've downloaded the 2nd book already.


Edited by Clockwork Cupcake on Saturday 19th December 18:30

LordGrover

32,346 posts

179 months

Monday 21st December 2020
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...in a similar way to Friday?
I remember loving it at the time, but fear it won't have aged well and will be particularly difficult to read now. In my early twenties when I read it and remember it fondly, but I suspect very un-PC by the standards of today.

havoc

26,096 posts

202 months

Monday 4th January
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Going back to some old favourites at the moment.

Just finished Red Mars by KSR, about to pick up Green Mars.

JonChalk

4,722 posts

77 months

Monday 8th February
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Okay folks, I know the thread regulars are pretty good in this regard, but I’d appreciate no spoilers on the new Adrian Tchaikovsky Dogs of War sequel, Bear Head as my OH has purchased it for a Valentine present for me.

That said- there’s a sequel!!!!

DibblyDobbler

10,750 posts

164 months

Monday 8th February
quotequote all
Just for info - I have finished my second lap of the Void series now. Quite enjoyed it but not massively - 7/10 for me.

As a wee change I am reading a few of the Jack Reacher books - good fun and they are taking about a week each which is a nice change from PFH!

Clockwork Cupcake

66,442 posts

239 months

Monday 8th February
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JonChalk said:
Okay folks, I know the thread regulars are pretty good in this regard, but I’d appreciate no spoilers on the new Adrian Tchaikovsky Dogs of War sequel, Bear Head as my OH has purchased it for a Valentine present for me.

That said- there’s a sequel!!!!
Awesome! I did not know that a sequel was available!

I just picked up the Kindle edition for £0.99

There is also a sequel for his novella "The Expert System's Brother"


i4got

4,470 posts

45 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
JonChalk said:
Okay folks, I know the thread regulars are pretty good in this regard, but I’d appreciate no spoilers on the new Adrian Tchaikovsky Dogs of War sequel, Bear Head as my OH has purchased it for a Valentine present for me.

That said- there’s a sequel!!!!
looks like Dogs of War kindle version is free with amazon prime at the moment.

Baron Greenback

5,395 posts

117 months

Tuesday 9th February
quotequote all
i4got said:
JonChalk said:
Okay folks, I know the thread regulars are pretty good in this regard, but I’d appreciate no spoilers on the new Adrian Tchaikovsky Dogs of War sequel, Bear Head as my OH has purchased it for a Valentine present for me.

That said- there’s a sequel!!!!
looks like Dogs of War kindle version is free with amazon prime at the moment.
Ta for that!

RizzoTheRat

21,006 posts

159 months

Tuesday 9th February
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Speaking of Tchaikovski, is Children of Ruin any good too? I quite enjoyed Children of time bit it had a very weak ending IMO.

Clockwork Cupcake

66,442 posts

239 months

Tuesday 9th February
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RizzoTheRat said:
Speaking of Tchaikovski, is Children of Ruin any good too? I quite enjoyed Children of time bit it had a very weak ending IMO.
Each to their own, but I thought the ending was very clever and satisfying.

Children of Ruin us definitely worth reading. Perhaps not quite as good as Children of Time, but I certainly enjoyed it.

p1doc

2,751 posts

151 months

Thursday 11th February
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Clockwork Cupcake said:
Each to their own, but I thought the ending was very clever and satisfying.

Children of Ruin us definitely worth reading. Perhaps not quite as good as Children of Time, but I certainly enjoyed it.
I really enjoyed dogs of war and children series his fantasy stuff is pretty good-spiderlight is a very different take on LOTR

glazbagun

11,844 posts

164 months

Thursday 11th February
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RizzoTheRat said:
Speaking of Tchaikovski, is Children of Ruin any good too? I quite enjoyed Children of time bit it had a very weak ending IMO.
I thought the ending was brilliant and found Children of Ruin weak by comparison, so take from that what you will. laugh

Still enjoyable, but nothing like as good as seeing through the spiders eyes as their culture grew.

Clockwork Cupcake

66,442 posts

239 months

Thursday 1st April
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I finally got round to reading Bear Head and finished it last night.

I thought it was a very worthy sequel to Dogs of War and you can tell it was written recently as there is some fairly topical stuff in there, I thought, such as the rise of alt-right and a retrograde step in tolerance and rights and racism, the erosion of previously-won civil liberties, and dog-whistle politics.

Plus the primary antagonist couldn't have been a less thinly-veiled allusion to Donald Trump.

I don't know if anyone has played the excellent video game SOMA but I thought there was a nice little call-out to it. Near the end of the book, Brian says he'll be "out there somewhere" with Bees, and someone points out that a copy will be but the Brian saying this won't be as he is still there, as it is a copy not a move. And Brian is cool with this. Contrast this with Simon in SOMA who throws a tantrum over this, and Cath placates him with the "Coin Toss" fallacy (WARNING: Spoilers for SOMA in that link).

Of course, SOMA didn't invent the concept, so it could just be coincidence.



Edited by Clockwork Cupcake on Sunday 4th April 20:08