Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Author
Discussion

Wayoftheflower

995 posts

203 months

Sunday 4th April
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Just finished Hilldiggers by Neal Asher, quite enjoyable if you can forgive him just assuming you're familiar with a bunch of stuff from the Polity universe.

I jumped into Asher via The technician (that had some very confusing sequences for a Polity newcomer) then some Prador stuff and then the Dark Intelligence trilogy.

Is it worth going back the Line of Polity and Spatterjay series? Or continue with the later Rise of the Jain?

DibblyDobbler

10,752 posts

165 months

Sunday 4th April
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The Line of Polity series I found excellent - definitely worth it thumbup

captain_cynic

7,140 posts

63 months

Sunday 4th April
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Wayoftheflower said:
Just finished Hilldiggers by Neal Asher, quite enjoyable if you can forgive him just assuming you're familiar with a bunch of stuff from the Polity universe.

I jumped into Asher via The technician (that had some very confusing sequences for a Polity newcomer) then some Prador stuff and then the Dark Intelligence trilogy.

Is it worth going back the Line of Polity and Spatterjay series? Or continue with the later Rise of the Jain?
Definately. It's best to read the Polity novels in the order the series were written in. The agent Cormac novels first, then Spatterjay.

Asher does rely on you reading the precious novels somewhat.

RizzoTheRat

21,034 posts

160 months

Thursday 8th April
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I'm halfway through Bear Head, Adrian Tchaikovsky's sequel to Dogs of War. I like the way he writes from the point of view of the characters, this one is from POV of a construction worker caught up in things he really doesn't want to be a part of, and Honey from the first book. Really enjoying it.
(ETA: I should have looked back a page before posting, but thanks for using the spoiler tags CC, I'll leave that bit until I've finished)

Edited by RizzoTheRat on Thursday 8th April 12:24

FunkyNige

7,531 posts

243 months

Thursday 8th April
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My wife bought me a stack of old second hand science fiction books a few months back and I've just finished All the Colours of Darkness by Lloyd Biggle Jr. that was originally published in 1963.
Only 200 pages long but it's a great read - the story is of a new teleport system has been developed, people are starting to use it to travel around the world instantly but then a few people go missing and a private investigator has to look into it.

I'm finding the old sci-fi very hit and miss (Voyage to Venus by C S Lewis was a hard slog) but this one is definitely in the hit pile. It's the start of a series of books involving this character but I'm a bit wary of sequels to older sci-fi as I've been burnt by the sequels to Dune and Ender's Game getting weirder and weirder as the books went on!

Clockwork Cupcake

66,534 posts

240 months

Thursday 8th April
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FunkyNige said:
Only 200 pages long but it's a great read - the story is of a new teleport system has been developed, people are starting to use it to travel around the world instantly but then a few people go missing and a private investigator has to look into it.
There's been a couple of good stories about teleportation that I have read over the years.

One was a short story by one of the masters (possibly Asimov) where teleportation was causing global Flash Mobs at protests / riots, and the steps taken by engineers to try to solve the problem. Ironically what they came up with was not dissimilar to what the British Transport Police do in London, which is to make tube stations in hot areas as no exit - ie. you can leave the area but you cannot enter.

The other was John Barnes' book "A Million Open Doors" which, amongst other things, explores the socioeconomic effects on a world that has recently been connected to the teleport network. In many ways it is not dissimilar to the issues that Bricks & Mortar shops experienced when joining the internet - a wider market but also much more competition.


Nimby

2,832 posts

118 months

Thursday 8th April
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Clockwork Cupcake said:
One was a short story by one of the masters (possibly Asimov) where teleportation was causing global Flash Mobs at protests / riots, and the steps taken by engineers to try to solve the problem. Ironically what they came up with was not dissimilar to what the British Transport Police do in London, which is to make tube stations in hot areas as no exit - ie. you can leave the area but you cannot enter.
That's Larry Niven. "Flash Crowd" and a few other related short stories. Another one was how teleportation affected alibis for crimes.

Clockwork Cupcake

66,534 posts

240 months

Thursday 8th April
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Nimby said:
That's Larry Niven. "Flash Crowd" and a few other related short stories. Another one was how teleportation affected alibis for crimes.
You know, I almost said Larry Niven. paperbag

havoc

26,114 posts

203 months

Thursday 8th April
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"I teleported home one night With Ron and Sid and Meg. Ron stole Meggie's heart away And I got Sidney's leg."

nre

484 posts

238 months

Sunday 25th April
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FunkyNige said:
My wife bought me a stack of old second hand science fiction books a few months back and I've just finished All the Colours of Darkness by Lloyd Biggle Jr. that was originally published in 1963.
Only 200 pages long but it's a great read - the story is of a new teleport system has been developed, people are starting to use it to travel around the world instantly but then a few people go missing and a private investigator has to look into it.
Read that when I was a lad (long time ago) and never knew there were any follow ups, will have to track some down. The only other one of his I've read is Monument, also a long time ago.

jet_noise

4,649 posts

150 months

Sunday 25th April
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nre said:
FunkyNige said:
My wife bought me a stack of old second hand science fiction books a few months back and I've just finished All the Colours of Darkness by Lloyd Biggle Jr. that was originally published in 1963.
Only 200 pages long but it's a great read - the story is of a new teleport system has been developed, people are starting to use it to travel around the world instantly but then a few people go missing and a private investigator has to look into it.
Read that when I was a lad (long time ago) and never knew there were any follow ups, will have to track some down. The only other one of his I've read is Monument, also a long time ago.
I've still got Monument, agreed a very good book.
Just bought Colours on this recommendation smile

Piginapoke

2,120 posts

153 months

Sunday 16th May
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Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.

JonChalk

4,734 posts

78 months

Monday 17th May
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Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
No spoilers 😉. Just started it and taking it slow. It is good so far though.

CheesecakeRunner

1,258 posts

59 months

Monday 17th May
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Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
It was ok. Very similar to The Martian, where the hero sciences the st out of everything. I actually preferred Artemis as at least he tried to do something different.

Matt_N

8,667 posts

170 months

Monday 24th May
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On a Hamilton binge at present, just finished the Abyss beyond Dreams and have just started Night without stars whilst trying to get through the Reality Dysfunction in the background.

JonChalk

4,734 posts

78 months

Monday 24th May
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CheesecakeRunner said:
Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
It was ok. Very similar to The Martian, where the hero sciences the st out of everything. I actually preferred Artemis as at least he tried to do something different.
That's bit like complaining that Jack Reacher always kicks the crap out of somebody wink

Just finished it & I really liked it. Once you buy into its central premise, it's pretty good.

Piginapoke

2,120 posts

153 months

Monday 24th May
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JonChalk said:
CheesecakeRunner said:
Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
It was ok. Very similar to The Martian, where the hero sciences the st out of everything. I actually preferred Artemis as at least he tried to do something different.
That's bit like complaining that Jack Reacher always kicks the crap out of somebody wink

Just finished it & I really liked it. Once you buy into its central premise, it's pretty good.
Me too- I thought the ending was really well thought out. And you have to love Rocky!

Nimby

2,832 posts

118 months

Monday 24th May
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Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
I'm about a third in. The astrophages are suspiciously similar to Stephen Baxter's photino birds from the Xeelee Sequence.

judas

5,700 posts

227 months

Monday 24th May
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Piginapoke said:
JonChalk said:
CheesecakeRunner said:
Piginapoke said:
Has any one read the new Andy Weir book, Hail Mary? I'm half way through, really enjoying it.
It was ok. Very similar to The Martian, where the hero sciences the st out of everything. I actually preferred Artemis as at least he tried to do something different.
That's bit like complaining that Jack Reacher always kicks the crap out of somebody wink

Just finished it & I really liked it. Once you buy into its central premise, it's pretty good.
Me too- I thought the ending was really well thought out. And you have to love Rocky!
Same here. Took a fair bit more suspension of disbelief than The Martian, but once you just go with it it's a good entertaining yarn. And Rocky is just ace! yes

Will be interesting to see how it fares as a film. Ryan Gosling is the lead apparently.

CheesecakeRunner

1,258 posts

59 months

Monday 24th May
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Piginapoke said:
Me too- I thought the ending was really well thought out. And you have to love Rocky!
And that he decided the translation of Rocky’s spouse’s name was ‘Adrian’ :-)