Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

denn69

64 posts

5 months

Wednesday 19th February
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Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archives). 10/10. It's the best series I've read in a while, and maybe of all time. The fantasy world-building is amazing and there's so many cool, small details in the scenery and culture that are delightful. The characters are so believable and distinctive, and the magic system is uniquely creative.

K12beano

19,805 posts

229 months

Wednesday 19th February
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denn69 said:
Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archives). 10/10. It's the best series I've read in a while, and maybe of all time. The fantasy world-building is amazing and there's so many cool, small details in the scenery and culture that are delightful. The characters are so believable and distinctive, and the magic system is uniquely creative.
Well - that sounds interesting! Or it may just be the way you tell ‘em!

I presume one should start at the beginning? “Way of Kings”, isn’t it?

PugwasHDJ80

7,119 posts

175 months

Wednesday 19th February
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K12beano said:
denn69 said:
Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archives). 10/10. It's the best series I've read in a while, and maybe of all time. The fantasy world-building is amazing and there's so many cool, small details in the scenery and culture that are delightful. The characters are so believable and distinctive, and the magic system is uniquely creative.
Well - that sounds interesting! Or it may just be the way you tell ‘em!

I presume one should start at the beginning? “Way of Kings”, isn’t it?
I'd agree with that review- one of my favourites- complex characters and an interesting world.

i'm currently reading the Macro and Cato Roman legionary series and still enjoying them hugely.

CopperBolt

187 posts

21 months

Thursday 20th February
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The Cruel Sea - Nicholas Monsarrat

Fancied a change of setting after Leviathan Wakes.

Only 40 or so pages in so not much happening yet but readable and have hopes.

MC Bodge

13,237 posts

129 months

Thursday 20th February
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The Runner: Four Years Living and Running in the Wilderness, Markus Torgeby.

Interesting to me, as I share some of his views and interests. Quite uplifting at times.

Goaty Bill 2

3,105 posts

73 months

Monday 24th February
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'Cancer Ward' Volumes one and two by Alexandr Solzhenitsyn
Translation: Nicholas Bethell and David Burg
Publisher: The Bodley Head, 1968

My first editions


These excellent first edition copies have been sitting on my shelf for some time and I finally got around to them.

A semi-autobiographical novel, set in winter/spring 1954/5, based upon Solzhenitsyn's experiences while being treated for cancer, in Tashkent, following his release from Gulag / sharashka and exile to South Kazakhstan.
(Solzhenitsyn's time in the sharashka is the subject of 'In The First Circle'.)

While the principal character, Kostoglotov, is the subject of much of the story, Solzhenitsyn explores many of the novel's characters in great depth; both the patients and the medical staff and even the cleaners. The patient's cancers, and how they cope, or not, with their circumstances, the lives the staff are forced to live, many of which are hundreds miles from their original homes.
Invariably there is a fair amount of dialogue between the patients on conditions in the Soviet Union and the principles of socialism and Marxism.

It includes a remarkable amount of detail on the various forms of cancer being treated and the treatments in use at the time, but for all the divergences (of sorts) to bring in the details of the various characters' lives and the treatments, the story holds together extremely well and flows easily from page to page.

Some readers have commented that they either found part 2 to be less interesting than part 1, or that they simply "couldn't get into it", but I suspect this is more often a result of a gap between reading the two parts.
The extended conversation between Kostoglotov and Shulubin in part two is especially note worthy.
I found the second part initially held my attention almost as well as the first, and improved rapidly to equal the first part, but would definitely recommend having both parts in hand before beginning.

As always, 'The Gulag Archipelago' excepted, Solzhenitsyn manages to give a clear insight into life in Soviet Russia without preaching, and regularly presenting the views and arguments of those that were much in favour of the state as it existed.


RC1807

9,021 posts

122 months

Monday 24th February
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Ploughing through Michael Connelly's Bosch novels at the moment, currently reading The Crossing.

I took a break from Bosch whilst on holiday recently, and read Sandi Toksvig's "Between the Stops", which raised more than a chuckle along the way.

Stuart70

1,986 posts

137 months

Tuesday 25th February
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Just finished Charles Cumming’s, “The Man Between”.
I wouldn’t. I did, so you don’t have to; written in the style of an emotionally backward adolescent fanboi of John LeCarre.
Could be a reason for that, I guess.

I suspect this is what you get for a multi book deal and a deadline. I hope so, because if this is the best he can do...
Sorry to be so negative, but it really was that bad.

j4r4lly

191 posts

89 months

Tuesday 25th February
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Currently reading "Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden which is part of the Wars of the Roses series.

Based on factual historical characters it's a really good read and I've enjoyed learning about the main players from this period in history.

droopsnoot

7,726 posts

196 months

Wednesday 26th February
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I'll have to dig out a Clive Cussler book next, as he's just died a couple of days ago.

Laurel Green

28,007 posts

186 months

Wednesday 26th February
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You'll have plenty to choose from. frown

Prolex-UK

1,241 posts

162 months

Thursday 27th February
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Reading Breakout at Stalingrad by Heinrich Gerlach

Author was serving German soldier at Stalingrad - Captured & imprisoned by the Russians.

Wrote the book while in captivity-manuscript discovered & destroyed by Russioans.

Rewrote it on release.

Slow going but worth a read


Desiderata

212 posts

8 months

Thursday 27th February
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j4r4lly said:
Currently reading "Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden which is part of the Wars of the Roses series.

Based on factual historical characters it's a really good read and I've enjoyed learning about the main players from this period in history.
I usually read a couple of books at a time, something heavy and non fiction that I can plod my way through, cross referencing and googling my way through interesting stuff it throws up, and something light and entertaining that I can drop into when tired and unable to concentrate.
I'm currently working my way through William Alexander's 'The City of Djinns', which although it's fairly small and light hearted, needs lots of cross referencing to expand my woeful knowledge of Asian political, religious, and architectural history.
I was gifted a set of Conn Iggulden's books which are essentially historical novels based loosely on the life of Ghengis Khan and which have been sitting forlornly on a shelf for a couple of years. I think I'll give them a try as light reading and to see how my historical knowledge hold true.

Prolex-UK

1,241 posts

162 months

Thursday 27th February
quotequote all
Desiderata said:
j4r4lly said:
Currently reading "Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden which is part of the Wars of the Roses series.

Based on factual historical characters it's a really good read and I've enjoyed learning about the main players from this period in history.
I usually read a couple of books at a time, something heavy and non fiction that I can plod my way through, cross referencing and googling my way through interesting stuff it throws up, and something light and entertaining that I can drop into when tired and unable to concentrate.
I'm currently working my way through William Alexander's 'The City of Djinns', which although it's fairly small and light hearted, needs lots of cross referencing to expand my woeful knowledge of Asian political, religious, and architectural history.
I was gifted a set of Conn Iggulden's books which are essentially historical novels based loosely on the life of Ghengis Khan and which have been sitting forlornly on a shelf for a couple of years. I think I'll give them a try as light reading and to see how my historical knowledge hold true.
The Ghengis Khan books are very good

CardinalBlue

207 posts

31 months

Thursday 27th February
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Currently reading Alone on the Wall: Alex Honnold and the Ultimate Limits of Adventure.

Written pre-Free Solo. It's ok - nothing more, nothing less in my opinion.

j4r4lly

191 posts

89 months

Thursday 27th February
quotequote all
Prolex-UK said:
Desiderata said:
j4r4lly said:
Currently reading "Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden which is part of the Wars of the Roses series.

Based on factual historical characters it's a really good read and I've enjoyed learning about the main players from this period in history.
I usually read a couple of books at a time, something heavy and non fiction that I can plod my way through, cross referencing and googling my way through interesting stuff it throws up, and something light and entertaining that I can drop into when tired and unable to concentrate.
I'm currently working my way through William Alexander's 'The City of Djinns', which although it's fairly small and light hearted, needs lots of cross referencing to expand my woeful knowledge of Asian political, religious, and architectural history.
I was gifted a set of Conn Iggulden's books which are essentially historical novels based loosely on the life of Ghengis Khan and which have been sitting forlornly on a shelf for a couple of years. I think I'll give them a try as light reading and to see how my historical knowledge hold true.
The Ghengis Khan books are very good
Yes, read the Ghengis Khan series and enjoyed them.

I started on the "Emperor" series which features Gaius Julius Caesar which I also really enjoyed. It's a good balance between factual characters and events and fictional "adventures" and people.

epom

6,812 posts

115 months

Thursday 27th February
quotequote all
Just finished The President is Missing. Not bad, great up to a point.

Prolex-UK

1,241 posts

162 months

Thursday 27th February
quotequote all
j4r4lly said:
Prolex-UK said:
Desiderata said:
j4r4lly said:
Currently reading "Stormbird" by Conn Iggulden which is part of the Wars of the Roses series.

Based on factual historical characters it's a really good read and I've enjoyed learning about the main players from this period in history.
I usually read a couple of books at a time, something heavy and non fiction that I can plod my way through, cross referencing and googling my way through interesting stuff it throws up, and something light and entertaining that I can drop into when tired and unable to concentrate.
I'm currently working my way through William Alexander's 'The City of Djinns', which although it's fairly small and light hearted, needs lots of cross referencing to expand my woeful knowledge of Asian political, religious, and architectural history.
I was gifted a set of Conn Iggulden's books which are essentially historical novels based loosely on the life of Ghengis Khan and which have been sitting forlornly on a shelf for a couple of years. I think I'll give them a try as light reading and to see how my historical knowledge hold true.
The Ghengis Khan books are very good
Yes, read the Ghengis Khan series and enjoyed them.

I started on the "Emperor" series which features Gaius Julius Caesar which I also really enjoyed. It's a good balance between factual characters and events and fictional "adventures" and people.
Yup read those as well ! Again excellent

droopsnoot

7,726 posts

196 months

Thursday 27th February
quotequote all
epom said:
Just finished The President is Missing. Not bad, great up to a point.
Interesting, that's on my "to read" pile.

IanA2

2,433 posts

116 months

Monday 2nd March
quotequote all
Just finished the first of Shona Maclean's Alexander Seaton tetralogy. New to me, she's another writer-historian (and Alistair Maclean's niece) in the style of C J Sansom. So if Shardlake's your cup of tea, I'd be very surprised if you didn't enjoy her talent.



ETA: typo

Edited by IanA2 on Monday 2nd March 19:53