Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

epom

6,932 posts

117 months

Thursday 4th June
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Taking a break from all the serious books I've read lately. I've no doubt this will make me smile.

Hammerhead

2,468 posts

210 months

Saturday 6th June
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Ace-T said:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-5282...
Link to a review of EM Forsters science fiction novella The Machine Stops. There is a link to download the novella too.

All I can say is blimey. Firstly who knew EMF wrote scifi, secondly that he wrote good scifi, thirdly woah, scarily prescient! yikes
I just read this, this afternoon. Flippin eck. He foresaw Zoom, tablets, Uber, The Internet of Things, the detachment of society through the worship of stuff, social media/review sites, fake news/history, and a whole heap more.

A fare warning for ‘us’ to stop falling into this bleak, worthless future - now. Chilling.


Edited by Hammerhead on Saturday 6th June 17:28

MC Bodge

13,732 posts

131 months

Saturday 6th June
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MC Bodge said:
MC Bodge said:
I'm reading "Seven Pillars of Wisdom" by T E Lawrence.

It's not exactly a light read. I will endeavour to finish it.
I have stuck with it. Reading a few pages at a time over breakfast. By page 72 it has improved. I wonder if he was just trying too hard in the early pages?
His descriptions of the people and places he visits are fascinating.
I'm glad I stuck with it. It is actually a very interesting book. His editor should have streamlined the flowery text in the early chapters.

droopsnoot

7,907 posts

198 months

Saturday 6th June
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I've just finished "The Deepest Grave" by Harry Bingham, an enjoyable police tale with a nice bit of humour in it.

K12beano

20,012 posts

231 months

Sunday 7th June
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Hammerhead said:
Ace-T said:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-5282...
Link to a review of EM Forsters science fiction novella The Machine Stops. There is a link to download the novella too.

All I can say is blimey. Firstly who knew EMF wrote scifi, secondly that he wrote good scifi, thirdly woah, scarily prescient! yikes
I just read this, this afternoon. Flippin eck. He foresaw Zoom, tablets, Uber, The Internet of Things, the detachment of society through the worship of stuff, social media/review sites, fake news/history, and a whole heap more.

A fare warning for ‘us’ to stop falling into this bleak, worthless future - now. Chilling.
"Oh Michael - but I'm telling you the plot!!" and I'm sooooo looking forward to the re-read I'm going to give that soon..... just as soon as I can finish reading stuff for work...... rolleyes

Jack15

1 posts

2 months

Monday 8th June
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I am reading about Kabuki, traditional Japanese popular drama with singing and dancing performed in a highly stylized manner. A rich blend of music, dance, mime, and spectacular staging and costuming, it has been a major theatrical form in Japan for four centuries.

TomTheTyke

324 posts

103 months

Monday 8th June
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Hello all, I've just found this thread. At the start of 2019 I made a resolution to read a bit more and to keep a record of what I was reading. Here is the list. For no particular reason other than I've enjoyed making time to read more regularly and I feel like I've learned a lot within fairly narrow areas, mainly history, politics and cricket!

2019

Our Island Story, HE Marshall
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
Kiriakos; A British Partisan in Wartime Greece, Don Turner
How I Found Livingstone, HM Stanley
The Second World War, AJP Taylor
A Classical Education, Caroline Taggart
A Clear Blue Sky, Jonny Bairstow
Prisoners of Geography, Tim Marhsall
Travellers in the Third Reich, Julia Boyd
Beyond a Boundary, CLR James
The Five, Hallie Rubenhold
The Secret Barrister
Roman Britain, RG Collingwood
Reach for the Sky, Paul Brickhill
Memoirs, Montgomery of Alamein
1959 The Year that Changed Everything, Fred Kaplan
Executive Summary of the Chilcot Report
SPQR A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
The English Constitution, Walter Bagehot
Nelson; Britannia's God of War, Andrew Lambert
Greece; A Journey in Time, SFA Coles
One Summer America 1927, Bill Bryson
The Odyssey, Homer
1914 1918 The History of the First World War, David Stephenson
The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, Robert Tressell

2020 so far

Tudor; The Family Story, Leanda De Lisle
Hereward; the Last Englishman, Peter Rex
The Strange Death of Europe, Douglas Murray
Test Match Special Diary 2019
Greek Civilization Vols 1-3, Andre Bonnard
Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank
The English Civil War a Peoples' History, Diane Purkiss
How to be a Footballer, Peter Crouch
William Pitt the Younger, William Hague
Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare
The Establishment & How They Get Away With It, Owen Jones
The Picador Book of Cricket, Ramachandra Guha ed.
The Hundred Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared, Jonas Jonasson
Empire, Niall Ferguson
Warren Hastings and British India, Penderel Moon (the only book on this list I had read before)
A Modern History of Hong Kong, Steve Tsang

Currently reading: The Iliad

During this time I've given up on a couple. Ian Wright's autobiography; I like football but it just didn't interest me. Captain Scott's diary, read the dramatic end but the rest of it was descriptions of snow, not sure why that was a surprise. Also The Scramble for Africa by Thomas Pakenham. It's so well researched but very dense; 700 pages of small writing for 30 years of history. Might start this up again given current events and I've read a bit on colonialism again recently.

FunkyNige

6,917 posts

231 months

Monday 8th June
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TomTheTyke said:
Hello all, I've just found this thread. At the start of 2019 I made a resolution to read a bit more and to keep a record of what I was reading. Here is the list. For no particular reason other than I've enjoyed making time to read more regularly and I feel like I've learned a lot within fairly narrow areas, mainly history, politics and cricket!

Roman Britain, RG Collingwood
SPQR A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
If you enjoy the history of ancient Rome I'd thoroughly recommend 'The Storm Before the Storm' by Mike Duncan, it covers the events from 133-80 BC (the period where things went from normal up to utterly bonkers). I bought it as I listened to his podcast and wanted to support him but it's a fairly lighthearted read about a fascinating period of history.

TomTheTyke

324 posts

103 months

Monday 8th June
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FunkyNige said:
If you enjoy the history of ancient Rome I'd thoroughly recommend 'The Storm Before the Storm' by Mike Duncan, it covers the events from 133-80 BC (the period where things went from normal up to utterly bonkers). I bought it as I listened to his podcast and wanted to support him but it's a fairly lighthearted read about a fascinating period of history.
Thanks for the recommendation. Is he the American guy? I was recommended his podcast but I couldn’t fully get along with his presenting style! Maybe better in written form.

FunkyNige

6,917 posts

231 months

Monday 8th June
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TomTheTyke said:
FunkyNige said:
If you enjoy the history of ancient Rome I'd thoroughly recommend 'The Storm Before the Storm' by Mike Duncan, it covers the events from 133-80 BC (the period where things went from normal up to utterly bonkers). I bought it as I listened to his podcast and wanted to support him but it's a fairly lighthearted read about a fascinating period of history.
Thanks for the recommendation. Is he the American guy? I was recommended his podcast but I couldn’t fully get along with his presenting style! Maybe better in written form.
Yeah, he’s the American guy with the podcast. To be honest if you didn’t like his podcast style you won’t like the book as it’s written in the style of the podcasts...

unrepentant

20,112 posts

212 months

Monday 8th June
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Just finished Warlight by Michael Ondaatje. Very evocative and beautifully written.



Before that D Day Girls by Sarah Rose. Better than I expected, a really good read.



Just finishing Robert Harris’s Munich. As always with Harris an interesting blend of fact and fiction and very enjoyable.



I’ve read a lot of books recently and most seem to be WW2 based. My Dad died last month and he lived through the war and I think that, and the fact that 2020 is so rubbish, sparked a nostalgic feeling. Going to read the latest Peter Robinson next for a change.

jet_noise

3,998 posts

138 months

Tuesday 9th June
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j4r4lly said:
I read this recently which I found fascinating. Henshaw was the Chief Test Pilot at Supermarine's Castle Bromwich factory and is estimated to have flown 10% of all Spitfires ever built.


More Spitfire goodness with Jeffrey Quill's Spitfire, a Test Pilot's Story

Also RR aero engine history (from Merlin development - jets) as experienced in Sir Stanley Holloway bio Not Much of an Engineer

tight fart

1,561 posts

229 months

Tuesday 9th June
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Has anyone on here read “The new Jackals” by Simon Reeve?
If so views please.

Desiderata

245 posts

10 months

Wednesday 10th June
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unrepentant said:
Just finished Warlight by Michael Ondaatje. Very evocative and beautifully written.

I haven't read the book yet (but will as I'm a fan) so maybe it ties in with the plot, but what's a (post 1956) Morris 1000 doing on the cover of a WW2 based book?
Pistonheads, where the trivial things matter!

dukeboy749r

968 posts

166 months

Wednesday 10th June
quotequote all
TomTheTyke said:
Hello all, I've just found this thread. At the start of 2019 I made a resolution to read a bit more and to keep a record of what I was reading. Here is the list. For no particular reason other than I've enjoyed making time to read more regularly and I feel like I've learned a lot within fairly narrow areas, mainly history, politics and cricket!

2019

Our Island Story, HE Marshall
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
Kiriakos; A British Partisan in Wartime Greece, Don Turner
How I Found Livingstone, HM Stanley
The Second World War, AJP Taylor
A Classical Education, Caroline Taggart
A Clear Blue Sky, Jonny Bairstow
Prisoners of Geography, Tim Marhsall
Travellers in the Third Reich, Julia Boyd
Beyond a Boundary, CLR James
The Five, Hallie Rubenhold
The Secret Barrister
Roman Britain, RG Collingwood
Reach for the Sky, Paul Brickhill
Memoirs, Montgomery of Alamein
1959 The Year that Changed Everything, Fred Kaplan
Executive Summary of the Chilcot Report
SPQR A History of Ancient Rome, Mary Beard
The English Constitution, Walter Bagehot
Nelson; Britannia's God of War, Andrew Lambert
Greece; A Journey in Time, SFA Coles
One Summer America 1927, Bill Bryson
The Odyssey, Homer
1914 1918 The History of the First World War, David Stephenson
The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, Robert Tressell

2020 so far

Tudor; The Family Story, Leanda De Lisle
Hereward; the Last Englishman, Peter Rex
The Strange Death of Europe, Douglas Murray
Test Match Special Diary 2019
Greek Civilization Vols 1-3, Andre Bonnard
Diary of a Young Girl, Anne Frank
The English Civil War a Peoples' History, Diane Purkiss
How to be a Footballer, Peter Crouch
William Pitt the Younger, William Hague
Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare
The Establishment & How They Get Away With It, Owen Jones
The Picador Book of Cricket, Ramachandra Guha ed.
The Hundred Year Old Man who Climbed out of the Window and Disappeared, Jonas Jonasson
Empire, Niall Ferguson
Warren Hastings and British India, Penderel Moon (the only book on this list I had read before)
A Modern History of Hong Kong, Steve Tsang

Currently reading: The Iliad

During this time I've given up on a couple. Ian Wright's autobiography; I like football but it just didn't interest me. Captain Scott's diary, read the dramatic end but the rest of it was descriptions of snow, not sure why that was a surprise. Also The Scramble for Africa by Thomas Pakenham. It's so well researched but very dense; 700 pages of small writing for 30 years of history. Might start this up again given current events and I've read a bit on colonialism again recently.
That's quite a list - and some useful books that have now been added to my 'must read' list - thank you

droopsnoot

7,907 posts

198 months

Wednesday 10th June
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I've just finished "Carver" by Tom Cain, which was pretty good. I thought that as it was named after the central character in the book it might be the first in a series, but it turns out that it's about the third or fourth. Carver is a random paid assassin with some secret agent background, hired to kill a financier.

unrepentant

20,112 posts

212 months

Wednesday 10th June
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Desiderata said:
unrepentant said:
Just finished Warlight by Michael Ondaatje. Very evocative and beautifully written.

I haven't read the book yet (but will as I'm a fan) so maybe it ties in with the plot, but what's a (post 1956) Morris 1000 doing on the cover of a WW2 based book?
Pistonheads, where the trivial things matter!
The book is set in 1945 and 1959. The parts involving the Morris are earlier, pre the launch of the Minor and the car is described as having a soft top. So the photo on the cover is wrong on all counts! I thought about writing to the publisher but decided I was being a bit pedantic! laugh

Gargamel

12,595 posts

217 months

Sunday 14th June
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So I have made it.

Finally finished The Count of Monte Cristo. A book I can’t say I loved, but its a good yarn.

It’s clear that 19th century Paris had a distinct lack of decent house servants, since of all the things to admire about the Count, his contemporaries seem to admire the alacrity and anticipation of his servants the most.

7/10


droopsnoot

7,907 posts

198 months

Monday 15th June
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I've just finished "Endangered" by CJ Box, one of the series featuring Joe Picket, the US Wildlife and Game warden. I always enjoy these, regardless of what other mayhem is going on they paint a nice picture of the wide open countryside.

MC Bodge

13,732 posts

131 months

Monday 15th June
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Gargamel said:
So I have made it.

Finally finished The Count of Monte Cristo. A book I can’t say I loved, but its a good yarn.

It’s clear that 19th century Paris had a distinct lack of decent house servants, since of all the things to admire about the Count, his contemporaries seem to admire the alacrity and anticipation of his servants the most.

7/10
I have that on my shelf. I have never got around to reading it. If I can reach the end of "seven Pillars of Wisdom", it may be my next epic classic, at some point.