Lewis Hamilton

Lewis Hamilton

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Discussion

Deesee

3,326 posts

32 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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HM should just make him a Lord and be done with it, Baron Hamilton has quite the twang..

(Top 5000 uk taxpayer it was announced today), not bad for a non resident)..

swisstoni

8,419 posts

228 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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I have no doubt that he will get all the gongs he deserves when he finally hangs up his boots. It would be outrageous if he didn’t.

(This all assumes that he hasn’t already been offered and has refused or asked for it to be deferred for some reason).

jsf

14,893 posts

185 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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Athlon said:
Disappointing to see he was overlooked for a knighthood again this year despite winning another championship.

All our other outstanding F1 drivers have been honoured even though non are a successful as Lewis.

Not on really.
He already has an MBE and most other F1 drivers including world champions have not been honoured more highly. Those that have are listed already.

eccles

11,198 posts

171 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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It's a team sport and as such the public faces of those teams seem to get less recognition, perhaps deservedly.
Many very good footballers or rugby players don't seem to get the gongs they deserve until later in life.

768

5,649 posts

45 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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eccles said:
It's a team sport and as such the public faces of those teams seem to get less recognition, perhaps deservedly.
Many very good footballers or rugby players don't seem to get the gongs they deserve until later in life.
Cricket?

REALIST123

12,537 posts

102 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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768 said:
eccles said:
It's a team sport and as such the public faces of those teams seem to get less recognition, perhaps deservedly.
Many very good footballers or rugby players don't seem to get the gongs they deserve until later in life.
Cricket?
Maybe cricketers are less dependent on equipment?


paua

1,426 posts

92 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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REALIST123 said:
Maybe cricketers are less dependent on equipment?
Just need their balls. wink

eccles

11,198 posts

171 months

Sunday 29th December 2019
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768 said:
eccles said:
It's a team sport and as such the public faces of those teams seem to get less recognition, perhaps deservedly.
Many very good footballers or rugby players don't seem to get the gongs they deserve until later in life.
Cricket?
I said less recognition, not no recognition.

Gregor Marshall

938 posts

177 months

Friday 3rd January
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2bars said:
jsf said:
Competent drivers can get within a very small margin of a top pro like lewis without shaking, the difference is not from stting yourself, its the lack of ability to get that tiny margin out of the equipment.

Good level drivers do not get out of a car having pushed to their limit having scared themselves, thats simply not on the agenda.

If you are getting out of cars having crapped your pants, you are doing it wrong.
As a competent club racer (circuit, sprints and hills) I strongly disagree with this. Putting in a properly fast lap is for me a very intense experience. Not at the time because you’re very focussed, but after I’ll get out of the car shaking, particularly on the hills. Maybe it’s the proximity of the trees. I don’t think it’s just me, I’ve shared assembly areas with 20+ drivers fizzing with nervous energy prior to taking the grid, it’s not pleasant. I do agree that there are some very talented club racers, maybe 5% or less of the entry, They are beyond competent though.
Definitely disagree, I've never got out of a car scared through my own limited amount of racing (but sometimes high pressured) and I can definitely relax beforehand. I watched my late Dad raced for 28 years and the only time he shock was to go and thump somone after being punted off, so I would definitely agree with my late Dad's sentiments here:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvuT9OmJ_HI

Maybe it's a generational thing, you had to be relaxed back in the day, because you knew the result if something went wrong, whereas now it is a lot safer, but to ne honest I still wouldn't want to hit a bank at Goodwood at 130+mph!!

Back to Lewis, I met him years and years ago when he first started out, nice young boy, but I'm not a fan of his lifestyle as a person that I/we get to see in the public eye (I bet he's a good bloke really), but as a racer he is bloody quick (if not the quickest F1 driver ever. but I would've loved to see what would of happened if Jackie Stewart had of raced for longer and Alain Prost wasn't so disliked) and deserves all the praise that he gets.

Drumroll

1,627 posts

69 months

Friday 3rd January
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Gregor Marshall said:
Definitely disagree, I've never got out of a car scared through my own limited amount of racing (but sometimes high pressured) and I can definitely relax beforehand. I watched my late Dad raced for 28 years and the only time he shock was to go and thump somone after being punted off, so I would definitely agree with my late Dad's sentiments here:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvuT9OmJ_HI

Maybe it's a generational thing, you had to be relaxed back in the day, because you knew the result if something went wrong, whereas now it is a lot safer, but to ne honest I still wouldn't want to hit a bank at Goodwood at 130+mph!! .
Not wishing to hijack this thread, but you have to agree Gregor, your dad was a one off. ( The sport is definitely the poorer for not having characters like Gerry around.)

jsf

14,893 posts

185 months

Friday 3rd January
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Hi Gregor, always nice to see the old man telling it like it is. biggrin

Hopefully see you around this year sometime.

Teddy Lop

2,169 posts

16 months

Saturday 4th January
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2bars said:
jsf said:
Competent drivers can get within a very small margin of a top pro like lewis without shaking, the difference is not from stting yourself, its the lack of ability to get that tiny margin out of the equipment.

Good level drivers do not get out of a car having pushed to their limit having scared themselves, thats simply not on the agenda.

If you are getting out of cars having crapped your pants, you are doing it wrong.
As a competent club racer (circuit, sprints and hills) I strongly disagree with this. Putting in a properly fast lap is for me a very intense experience. Not at the time because you’re very focussed, but after I’ll get out of the car shaking, particularly on the hills. Maybe it’s the proximity of the trees. I don’t think it’s just me, I’ve shared assembly areas with 20+ drivers fizzing with nervous energy prior to taking the grid, it’s not pleasant. I do agree that there are some very talented club racers, maybe 5% or less of the entry, They are beyond competent though.
one of the key differences between most club-level racers and someone like Lewis Hamilton is self belief though. You don't get there without feeling entitled to victory. Lorenzo is an example of what happens when it slips just a little.

Dermot O'Logical

751 posts

78 months

Saturday 4th January
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Drumroll said:
Gregor Marshall said:
Definitely disagree, I've never got out of a car scared through my own limited amount of racing (but sometimes high pressured) and I can definitely relax beforehand. I watched my late Dad raced for 28 years and the only time he shock was to go and thump somone after being punted off, so I would definitely agree with my late Dad's sentiments here:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvuT9OmJ_HI

Maybe it's a generational thing, you had to be relaxed back in the day, because you knew the result if something went wrong, whereas now it is a lot safer, but to ne honest I still wouldn't want to hit a bank at Goodwood at 130+mph!! .
Not wishing to hijack this thread, but you have to agree Gregor, your dad was a one off. ( The sport is definitely the poorer for not having characters like Gerry around.)
Gregor, your Dad was my favourite British driver of all time, regardless of type of car or class of racing. An absolute gentleman, a great character, and an outrageously talented driver.

Deesee

3,326 posts

32 months

Thursday 9th January
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Dani Ric donates a race suit, Lewis donates 500k


https://twitter.com/lewishamilton/status/121531951...




Edited by Deesee on Thursday 9th January 18:05


Edited by Deesee on Thursday 9th January 18:10

REALIST123

12,537 posts

102 months

Thursday 9th January
quotequote all
Deesee said:
Dani Ric donates a race suit, Lewis donates 500k


https://twitter.com/lewishamilton/status/121531951...




Edited by Deesee on Thursday 9th January 18:05


Edited by Deesee on Thursday 9th January 18:10
Yes £260k (500k $Aus) wouldn’t be a life changing amount for either of them but a pair of boots? WTF?

TheDeuce

3,938 posts

15 months

Thursday 9th January
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I'm lost as to what the aim of this campaign is. These wild fires have been a factor of Australian life way before man wandered into the place and I seem to remember learning at school that it was a vital part of the regeneration of the land for the sake of the animals and plant life. This campaign seems to have made people 'anti bush fire' which is a bizarre stance to take really.

Anyway, good on anyone who does donate - we sent $50. It may be nature, it may be part of the natural cycle, but if someone manages to drag a critter from the smoke and it costs to get them back up and bouncing, then why not. In reality, whatever his motivation, Lewis has just paid the budget of a kangaroo or Koala sanctuary for a year. I'm also not sure what they're going to do with a racing suit - although I guess it's flame proof so could briefly be of some use.

Athlon

3,896 posts

155 months

Thursday 9th January
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
I'm lost as to what the aim of this campaign is. These wild fires have been a factor of Australian life way before man wandered into the place and I seem to remember learning at school that it was a vital part of the regeneration of the land for the sake of the animals and plant life. This campaign seems to have made people 'anti bush fire' which is a bizarre stance to take really.

Anyway, good on anyone who does donate - we sent $50. It may be nature, it may be part of the natural cycle, but if someone manages to drag a critter from the smoke and it costs to get them back up and bouncing, then why not. In reality, whatever his motivation, Lewis has just paid the budget of a kangaroo or Koala sanctuary for a year. I'm also not sure what they're going to do with a racing suit - although I guess it's flame proof so could briefly be of some use.
The wildfires used to burn off the fallen leaves etc fairly often and fairly fast and low, A few years ago it was judged to be bad for the animals etc so brush clearing by setting fires was banned the debris built up until these fires and was enough fuel to set the canopy alight, game over at that point.

Once again man 'manages' the land and tries to change nature instead of working with it, and it all ends in tears.

REALIST123

12,537 posts

102 months

Thursday 9th January
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
I'm lost as to what the aim of this campaign is. These wild fires have been a factor of Australian life way before man wandered into the place and I seem to remember learning at school that it was a vital part of the regeneration of the land for the sake of the animals and plant life. This campaign seems to have made people 'anti bush fire' which is a bizarre stance to take really.

Anyway, good on anyone who does donate - we sent $50. It may be nature, it may be part of the natural cycle, but if someone manages to drag a critter from the smoke and it costs to get them back up and bouncing, then why not. In reality, whatever his motivation, Lewis has just paid the budget of a kangaroo or Koala sanctuary for a year. I'm also not sure what they're going to do with a racing suit - although I guess it's flame proof so could briefly be of some use.
We have good friends in Tuross Head, which is right in the middle of the worst affected areas. We were all over that area a couple of years back, driving up the coast from Melbourne to Sydney (with a detour to visit Mount Panorama, I might add!) Fortunately they’re on an isthmus which is relatively easier to protect but even so they’ve been on the beach for a few nights recently.

You’re right that bush fires are a factor of life over there. Indeed, our friends’ house was built to a standard that is supposed to resist a bush fire, as some are. They know they happen. But this year, not only are temperatures much higher than normal, mainly due the the Indian Ocean Dipole, there is much more to burn than normal because of environmental pressure groups who have resisted and stopped, in many cases, controlled burns in recent years.

Those groups supposedly did that to protect animals and birds who inevitably suffer in the fires, though at least they have a chance when the fires are managed. The net result of this year’s fires has been far more animals and birds dying than would ever have happened. It’s also far more the threatening to species; if a relatively small number perish the species can rebuild, with the number this year, who knows?

The final factor has been lack of rational, timely or sufficient action by the authorities, who have taken a view similar to yours. only in the last few days have they really woken up and it’s too late.

But the net result has been a disaster. A huge area (try relating it to the UK), destroyed, thousands of homes and at least 28 people dead (and many still missing) and estimates of 1,000,000,000 animals and birds.

That’s why there is this campaign.

We’re off there again next month, who knows what we’ll find but it isn’t going to be the beautiful place we left two years ago, that’s for sure.






TheDeuce

3,938 posts

15 months

Thursday 9th January
quotequote all
REALIST123 said:
TheDeuce said:
I'm lost as to what the aim of this campaign is. These wild fires have been a factor of Australian life way before man wandered into the place and I seem to remember learning at school that it was a vital part of the regeneration of the land for the sake of the animals and plant life. This campaign seems to have made people 'anti bush fire' which is a bizarre stance to take really.

Anyway, good on anyone who does donate - we sent $50. It may be nature, it may be part of the natural cycle, but if someone manages to drag a critter from the smoke and it costs to get them back up and bouncing, then why not. In reality, whatever his motivation, Lewis has just paid the budget of a kangaroo or Koala sanctuary for a year. I'm also not sure what they're going to do with a racing suit - although I guess it's flame proof so could briefly be of some use.
We have good friends in Tuross Head, which is right in the middle of the worst affected areas. We were all over that area a couple of years back, driving up the coast from Melbourne to Sydney (with a detour to visit Mount Panorama, I might add!) Fortunately they’re on an isthmus which is relatively easier to protect but even so they’ve been on the beach for a few nights recently.

You’re right that bush fires are a factor of life over there. Indeed, our friends’ house was built to a standard that is supposed to resist a bush fire, as some are. They know they happen. But this year, not only are temperatures much higher than normal, mainly due the the Indian Ocean Dipole, there is much more to burn than normal because of environmental pressure groups who have resisted and stopped, in many cases, controlled burns in recent years.

Those groups supposedly did that to protect animals and birds who inevitably suffer in the fires, though at least they have a chance when the fires are managed. The net result of this year’s fires has been far more animals and birds dying than would ever have happened. It’s also far more the threatening to species; if a relatively small number perish the species can rebuild, with the number this year, who knows?

The final factor has been lack of rational, timely or sufficient action by the authorities, who have taken a view similar to yours. only in the last few days have they really woken up and it’s too late.

But the net result has been a disaster. A huge area (try relating it to the UK), destroyed, thousands of homes and at least 28 people dead (and many still missing) and estimates of 1,000,000,000 animals and birds.

That’s why there is this campaign.

We’re off there again next month, who knows what we’ll find but it isn’t going to be the beautiful place we left two years ago, that’s for sure.
What is there to say? It's a very hot place where shrub and woods grow quickly... Fires will break out. If they're controlled ahead of each bushfire season then each year millions of animals perish. If not, it goes for a handful of years and then a massive fire results and the same number overall will perish. The amount of fuel to burn is directly linked to the spread of the burn, and the 'fuel' grows at the same rate no matter what the burn frequency is. It seems that man hasn't made things better or worse, as so often we've simply been ineffectual overall.

I drove from Sydney to Melbourne during a controlled burn and my greatest memory was the smell and the ash haze that we couldn't keep out of our car or our hotel room. It's a different world over there when you consider the sheer scale of it all, and just how much life there is. Far beyond the management of the tiny number of humans that inhabit the place.

REALIST123

12,537 posts

102 months

Friday 10th January
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
What is there to say? It's a very hot place where shrub and woods grow quickly... Fires will break out. If they're controlled ahead of each bushfire season then each year millions of animals perish. If not, it goes for a handful of years and then a massive fire results and the same number overall will perish. The amount of fuel to burn is directly linked to the spread of the burn, and the 'fuel' grows at the same rate no matter what the burn frequency is. It seems that man hasn't made things better or worse, as so often we've simply been ineffectual overall.

I drove from Sydney to Melbourne during a controlled burn and my greatest memory was the smell and the ash haze that we couldn't keep out of our car or our hotel room. It's a different world over there when you consider the sheer scale of it all, and just how much life there is. Far beyond the management of the tiny number of humans that inhabit the place.
Sorry, you clearly haven’t a clue and do t want to know.

Oh well.