Haas chose Russiaโ€™s Nikita Mazepin

Haas chose Russiaโ€™s Nikita Mazepin

Author
Discussion

HustleRussell

19,074 posts

124 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
M5-911 said:
Sandpit Steve said:
M5-911 said:
SpudLink said:
I think the drivers who manhandled the ’80s turbo cars around the track might laugh at the suggestion 2021 cars are hard to drive.
Do you really think that 80s turbo cars were more difficult to drive? I really doubt.
Have a look at Senna at Monaco, driving most of the lap one-handed:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=wQgP9nugt5I

Oh, and when they go out for qualifying, with a special engine designed to last just the one lap, it’s got 600bhp more than it had in the practice session!
Yes, but still very slow to compare with today's time. Modern cars requires a much higher level of fitness.

One my clients is a f1 collector and racer (pretty good!) and he is no were near able to drive a modern f1.

Brundle himself said that the last few year, the cars have been brutal to drive and much more difficult to handle than anything he drove before. I think that I will go with people who have experienced the real deal on that one... Lol
There is a big difference between pootling around on a sighting lap and actually trying to go quick.

We are both using insular opinions and remarks to try to compare two very different animals.

Martin Brundle was a F1 driver in the 80s and is now over 60.

80s turbo cars had appalling manners and it would be very difficult for any driver to jump in and do a push lap without losing control or breaking the car.

Current cars are ‘less difficult to drive’ (which is the simple question you originally asked) but place a much higher physical demand upon the driver during braking and cornering.

HustleRussell

19,074 posts

124 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
The problem mazepin has now is that the pressure to not make a similarly embarrassing mistake next outing is so great that he probably will make such a mistake.

In fact, in fairness, if he can get through the entirety of the next quali and GP without making a fool of himself again, I would actually say that is quite impressive.
I was expecting Mazepin to be a threat to the more methodical and ‘slowly building’ Mick Schumacher for much of this season, and I still think he might be.

There is no doubt who the stronger driver was throughout the first race weekend though, and I’d love to see that continue.

Sandpit Steve

2,649 posts

38 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
HustleRussell said:
There is a big difference between pootling around on a sighting lap and actually trying to go quick.

We are both using insular opinions and remarks to try to compare two very different animals.

Martin Brundle was a F1 driver in the 80s and is now over 60.

80s turbo cars had appalling manners and it would be very difficult for any driver to jump in and do a push lap without losing control or breaking the car.

Current cars are ‘less difficult to drive’ (which is the simple question you originally asked) but place a much higher physical demand upon the driver during braking and cornering.
Yes, a different type of skill.

One of the recurring themes of the Netflix show was how today’s drivers are properly fit athletes - they were always in the gym or with their trainer, when out of the car. It’s one of the reasons that F1 is more of a young man’s sport now, than it used to be.

Steamer

12,367 posts

177 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
Sandpit Steve said:
HustleRussell said:
There is a big difference between pootling around on a sighting lap and actually trying to go quick.

We are both using insular opinions and remarks to try to compare two very different animals.

Martin Brundle was a F1 driver in the 80s and is now over 60.

80s turbo cars had appalling manners and it would be very difficult for any driver to jump in and do a push lap without losing control or breaking the car.

Current cars are ‘less difficult to drive’ (which is the simple question you originally asked) but place a much higher physical demand upon the driver during braking and cornering.
Yes, a different type of skill.

One of the recurring themes of the Netflix show was how today’s drivers are properly fit athletes - they were always in the gym or with their trainer, when out of the car. It’s one of the reasons that F1 is more of a young man’s sport now, than it used to be.
Tricky one this.. we've also got two guys racing against the sons of men the raced in the same formula, one of which is essentially making a come back in his very late 30s (certainly no question that Alonso is an athlete though)

However - with the cars being so evenly matched its essential that the driver is at the very top of their physical & mental game too (not so much a factor in the 70's & 80's)

stemll

2,527 posts

164 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
Petrus1983 said:
Nikita could have won the race and I still wouldn’t like him. So this was just perfect smile
Quite. "Give the kid a chance..." Ok... Spin, spin, second behind team mate in quali, spin... Lights out and... Crash.

Fairs fair biggrin
In his first year in F2, Mazepin finished 18th with 11 points while his teammate (de Vries) won the Championship. He'll close the gap on Schumacher this year, no way will he end up 50 points behind him. 50 laps yes, points no.

TheDeuce

8,907 posts

30 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
HustleRussell said:
TheDeuce said:
The problem mazepin has now is that the pressure to not make a similarly embarrassing mistake next outing is so great that he probably will make such a mistake.

In fact, in fairness, if he can get through the entirety of the next quali and GP without making a fool of himself again, I would actually say that is quite impressive.
I was expecting Mazepin to be a threat to the more methodical and ‘slowly building’ Mick Schumacher for much of this season, and I still think he might be.

There is no doubt who the stronger driver was throughout the first race weekend though, and I’d love to see that continue.
I know what you mean - although to be honest mazepin has been so terrible all weekend, so far off Mick, it could well be that he's simply one of those drivers that can't make the step up to F1. Which wouldn't be a total shocker as he's hardly there on merit is he? He was a decent, above average F2 driver but not at the level I'd typically expect to see get bumped up to F1.

vaud

39,843 posts

119 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
I know what you mean - although to be honest mazepin has been so terrible all weekend, so far off Mick, it could well be that he's simply one of those drivers that can't make the step up to F1. Which wouldn't be a total shocker as he's hardly there on merit is he? He was a decent, above average F2 driver but not at the level I'd typically expect to see get bumped up to F1.
True, but he didn't really have a choice. He took time to mature in F2 so let's give him a season or 2.

TheDeuce

8,907 posts

30 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
vaud said:
TheDeuce said:
I know what you mean - although to be honest mazepin has been so terrible all weekend, so far off Mick, it could well be that he's simply one of those drivers that can't make the step up to F1. Which wouldn't be a total shocker as he's hardly there on merit is he? He was a decent, above average F2 driver but not at the level I'd typically expect to see get bumped up to F1.
True, but he didn't really have a choice. He took time to mature in F2 so let's give him a season or 2.
I expect we'll know one way or the other fairly quickly. Not that it actually matters in terms of his seat, he's going to have as many seasons as his dad is prepared to pay for.

kiseca

8,838 posts

183 months

Wednesday 31st March
quotequote all
Steamer said:
Sandpit Steve said:
HustleRussell said:
There is a big difference between pootling around on a sighting lap and actually trying to go quick.

We are both using insular opinions and remarks to try to compare two very different animals.

Martin Brundle was a F1 driver in the 80s and is now over 60.

80s turbo cars had appalling manners and it would be very difficult for any driver to jump in and do a push lap without losing control or breaking the car.

Current cars are ‘less difficult to drive’ (which is the simple question you originally asked) but place a much higher physical demand upon the driver during braking and cornering.
Yes, a different type of skill.

One of the recurring themes of the Netflix show was how today’s drivers are properly fit athletes - they were always in the gym or with their trainer, when out of the car. It’s one of the reasons that F1 is more of a young man’s sport now, than it used to be.
Tricky one this.. we've also got two guys racing against the sons of men the raced in the same formula, one of which is essentially making a come back in his very late 30s (certainly no question that Alonso is an athlete though)

However - with the cars being so evenly matched its essential that the driver is at the very top of their physical & mental game too (not so much a factor in the 70's & 80's)
I wonder if it's about the cars being evenly matched or if it's more (or as much) about the drivers needing to be evenly matched? Lauda changed the game in the '70s with his preparation and fitness, and Schumacher raised the bar again. He was so fit and prepared the other drivers simply couldn't match his level of effort over a full race distance. Berger has openly said he never liked exercise and used to find driving the cars really tiring, but he still managed. However, the other drivers around him were a mixed bag. If Berger had been flagging while a bunch of modern superfit drivers around him were still at full steam, it may have been more obvious. On the flipside, if all the drivers today had something closer to Berger's attitude, I'd think they're still finishing races and entertaining us, and we wouldn't realise how much slower they are than they could be.

Stewart said he won most of his races in the first five laps, because while everyone else was getting really hyped up and nervous, his preparation before the start of a race was all about making himself calm. While the other drivers were psychologically maxed out before a wheel turned, he had mental capacity to spare.

I reckon someone with Schumacher's attitude to fitness and preparation could have changed the game in any era. Given them an edge over their team mate, which makes them look like a driver with something extra, which leads to a seat in a top car. Obviously you need talent too, but there are so many things that can have an impact on race performance that the team that covers the most of them wins. That's what Ross Brawn recognised with his strategy committed to print as Total Performance.

mat205125

16,100 posts

177 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
Mazepin could be 2021s Michael Andretti

Leithen

7,424 posts

231 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
mat205125 said:
Mazepin could be 2021s Michael Andretti
I suspect he is nowhere near as good as Michael Andretti.

Blib

37,539 posts

161 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
Well, like all drivers, he has nowhere to hide. He either sinks or he swims.

Another 22 opportunities to go.

vaud

39,843 posts

119 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
Blib said:
Well, like all drivers, he has nowhere to hide. He either sinks or he swims.

Another 22 opportunities to go.
Plus he can blame the car for 2021, which for pace is probably fair.

All he needs to is have some clean races and beat Mick about half of the time.

SpudLink

3,479 posts

156 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
vaud said:
Plus he can blame the car for 2021, which for pace is probably fair.

All he needs to is have some clean races and beat Mick about half of the time.
I don’t think he needs to do even that. If he out qualifies Schumacher a few times and beats him in 7 or 8 races, many people will think he’s doing ok. Personally I don’t yet see any reason to think Schumacher is special, but there seems to be a body of opinion that he’s the most exciting thing since Verstappen. So Mazepin only needs to look like he’s close.

Right now it’s more about perception that actual ability.

Petrus1983

4,769 posts

126 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
vaud said:
Plus he can blame the car for 2021, which for pace is probably fair.

All he needs to is have some clean races and beat Mick about half of the time.
He came 18th in 2019 and 5th in 2020. 2020 also showed he binned it - a lot. Nothing in his background suggests greatness, even with the bank balance he’s had supporting him.

Joey Deacon

3,405 posts

140 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
Petrus1983 said:
vaud said:
Plus he can blame the car for 2021, which for pace is probably fair.

All he needs to is have some clean races and beat Mick about half of the time.
He came 18th in 2019 and 5th in 2020. 2020 also showed he binned it - a lot. Nothing in his background suggests greatness, even with the bank balance he’s had supporting him.
As long as he impresses the team with the speed of his bank transfers everything will be OK. I am sure Gene Haas is hoping his dad with do a Lawrence Stroll and effectively buy the team for his son.

I suspect Gene is more than done with F1 and wants a way out.


Munter

30,455 posts

205 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
Joey Deacon said:
.

I suspect Gene is more than done with F1 and wants a way out.
Absolutely. Anybody want to buy an F1 team? Anybody...will take corrupt mafia money, hookers, blood diamonds, land, whatever.

ajprice

20,146 posts

160 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all


hehe

TheDeuce

8,907 posts

30 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
ajprice said:


hehe
yes

Almost twice as long actually - from lights out to the start of his crash Mazepin managed just 21 seconds of driving..

ajprice

20,146 posts

160 months

Thursday 1st April
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
yes

Almost twice as long actually - from lights out to the start of his crash Mazepin managed just 21 seconds of driving..
I was wondering how long the whole 'Is that Glock?!' lasted