Jamie Chadwick - First competitive female driver in F1?

Jamie Chadwick - First competitive female driver in F1?

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Discussion

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Cold said:
TheDeuce said:
SmoothCriminal said:
If women have the skill to compete and make it to f1 then they should not be getting special treatment or an easy ride they should start at the beginning like every other male driver competing against males.

What is the point of women racing against each other like Chadwick who then goes into a formula and gets absolutely smashed by males with less experience than her

I really wish someone would put a female into an f1 car so we can be done with this debate.
They have put females into F1 cars.

One of them won half a point once: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_female_Formu...
They have put many, many men into F1 cars too. A huge number of those men didn't even do as well as that.
What's your point? Sure, there have been some blokes allowed to climb in an F1 car that had no business doing so.. but they're in the extreme minority.

It's certainly not the 100% failure rate that female F1 drivers have in the sport.

LukeBrown66

2,243 posts

23 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
The issue is that so far, other than perhaps Galica and Wilson, nearly every female racing driver certainly in F1 was eitehr "Mingling" with the right peopel to get there a la Jorda, Amati and Wolff, or used money to get there a la Calderon.

Only one of these is possible with men, a guy cant really use his looks to get to the top as Jorda managed to, she had no talent to speak of yet managed to get to that level very quickly through one way or another.

Blokes can only by there way in, and it has been the case for a long time, way back to guys like Hector Rebaque, Zunino, right through to even half decent guys like Diniz, a lot of Japanese drivers etc.

Women stand a far better chance of being promoted, but you still need to be good and most of them aren't

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
LukeBrown66 said:
The issue is that so far, other than perhaps Galica and Wilson, nearly every female racing driver certainly in F1 was eitehr "Mingling" with the right peopel to get there a la Jorda, Amati and Wolff, or used money to get there a la Calderon.

Only one of these is possible with men, a guy cant really use his looks to get to the top as Jorda managed to, she had no talent to speak of yet managed to get to that level very quickly through one way or another.

Blokes can only by there way in, and it has been the case for a long time, way back to guys like Hector Rebaque, Zunino, right through to even half decent guys like Diniz, a lot of Japanese drivers etc.

Women stand a far better chance of being promoted, but you still need to be good and most of them aren't
It's all moot these days anyway as not just anyone can buy or flirt their way into a drive, the superlicense sees to that. Anyone wanting a seat regardless of whats nestled betwixt their legs needs to at least have achieved 'something' in F3 or F2 and another series - basically Mazepin is about as talentless as anyone can be and still get a seat regardless of deserving it or not.

Before the superlicense days some of the no hopers to beg a seat couldn't even qualify for many races. Which led to some hilarious driving spectacles but I'm glad those days are gone.

mw88

974 posts

88 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
basically Mazepin is about as talentless as anyone can be and still get a seat regardless of deserving it or not..
F3 Asian Championship, 2019 - 2020


whistle

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
mw88 said:
TheDeuce said:
basically Mazepin is about as talentless as anyone can be and still get a seat regardless of deserving it or not..
F3 Asian Championship, 2019 - 2020


whistle
Exactly. He wasn't good enough for a seat on merit but he at least was competitive enough to accumulate the points required to make buying in possible.

Back in the early 90's the money alone could have been enough. For many in the preceding decades it was. And they were all woeful!

thegreenhell

10,702 posts

196 months

Friday 13th May
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How is Joey Alders career progressing? He is surely set for stardom based on that.

JonChalk

5,592 posts

87 months

Friday 13th May
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thegreenhell said:
How is Joey Alders career progressing? He is surely set for stardom based on that.
I have never heard of him, and (until now) prided (word?) myself on following the junior formulae.....

SmoothCriminal

4,197 posts

176 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
I've been pondering this since I commented and I actually think W series and women only series are the way to go.

I don't see this fascination of having women compete against men in F1, if women can't physically compete against men (as has been said above) then why must the men's series be dumbed down let them race each other as they do in most other physically limited sports.


carl_w

7,429 posts

235 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
mw88 said:
F3 Asian Championship, 2019 - 2020


whistle
Pietro Fittipaldi has taken part in two F1 races.

freedman

4,561 posts

184 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
LukeBrown66 said:
The issue is that so far, other than perhaps Galica and Wilson, nearly every female racing driver certainly in F1 was eitehr "Mingling" with the right peopel to get there a la Jorda, Amati and Wolff, or used money to get there a la Calderon.

Only one of these is possible with men, a guy cant really use his looks to get to the top as Jorda managed to, she had no talent to speak of yet managed to get to that level very quickly through one way or another.

Blokes can only by there way in, and it has been the case for a long time, way back to guys like Hector Rebaque, Zunino, right through to even half decent guys like Diniz, a lot of Japanese drivers etc.

Women stand a far better chance of being promoted, but you still need to be good and most of them aren't
You omitted Lella Lombardi, who was better than both (IMO), and the only woman to score points in a GP

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
SmoothCriminal said:
I've been pondering this since I commented and I actually think W series and women only series are the way to go.

I don't see this fascination of having women compete against men in F1, if women can't physically compete against men (as has been said above) then why must the men's series be dumbed down let them race each other as they do in most other physically limited sports.
That's fine and I agree. But they need an entire series in tiers leading to a w series for the elite if it's going to work. Right now all they have is the equivalent of F3 and then it's game over.

The problem is who's gonna pay for them to have multiple levels of female only motorsport..

F1 only exists (now) because it puts on a show people want to see, and pay to see one way or another. W series generates enough to pay for itself as just a single, token series. That's probably enough for most viewers and sponsors.. box ticked, women go racing.

I do however think it would be a great idea if the top three women each season were entered into a handful of races in F2 style cars along with a grid made of other past top three W racers. Then the winner of that can look to getting back on the F1 ladder.

Edited by TheDeuce on Friday 13th May 19:06

entropy

4,604 posts

180 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
LukeBrown66 said:
Women stand a far better chance of being promoted, but you still need to be good and most of them aren't
Matthew Carter admitted that the reason he hired Carmen Jorda for Lotus, from the advice of Bernie Ecclestone, was to attract attention and sponsors.

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
entropy said:
LukeBrown66 said:
Women stand a far better chance of being promoted, but you still need to be good and most of them aren't
Matthew Carter admitted that the reason he hired Carmen Jorda for Lotus, from the advice of Bernie Ecclestone, was to attract attention and sponsors.
A no brainer surely. A down and out team has two drivers to choose from to drive a slow car.. choose the one that will bring sponsors and headlines.

Cynical I know but.. I can see it happening in F1 at some point if a woman were to get the required license points.

thegreenhell

10,702 posts

196 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
entropy said:
Matthew Carter admitted that the reason he hired Carmen Jorda for Lotus, from the advice of Bernie Ecclestone, was to attract attention and sponsors.
I don't think she ever even tested the car, did she? So basically Jorda was signed for the same reason that Jordan (Katie Price) was hired by Jordan (Eddie).

jsf

25,883 posts

213 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
thegreenhell said:
entropy said:
Matthew Carter admitted that the reason he hired Carmen Jorda for Lotus, from the advice of Bernie Ecclestone, was to attract attention and sponsors.
I don't think she ever even tested the car, did she? So basically Jorda was signed for the same reason that Jordan (Katie Price) was hired by Jordan (Eddie).
Jorda was absolutely panned by other female drivers for suggesting women shouldn't compete against men and advocated a series like W series.

She was also panned by female racers when she was appointed to a position in the FIA to promote women in motorsport, because her results were poor.

Funny how now everything she wanted and was panned for is the next great hope.

W series is a nonsense and will do nothing to get a woman into F1.


TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
jsf said:
thegreenhell said:
entropy said:
Matthew Carter admitted that the reason he hired Carmen Jorda for Lotus, from the advice of Bernie Ecclestone, was to attract attention and sponsors.
I don't think she ever even tested the car, did she? So basically Jorda was signed for the same reason that Jordan (Katie Price) was hired by Jordan (Eddie).
Jorda was absolutely panned by other female drivers for suggesting women shouldn't compete against men and advocated a series like W series.

She was also panned by female racers when she was appointed to a position in the FIA to promote women in motorsport, because her results were poor.

Funny how now everything she wanted and was panned for is the next great hope.

W series is a nonsense and will do nothing to get a woman into F1.
It's not about the destination it's about the journey.

Except in real life, where it's all about the destination smile

jsf

25,883 posts

213 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
It's not about the destination it's about the journey.

Except in real life, where it's all about the destination smile
It's all about the money in these single make championships.

Speed Badger

1,908 posts

94 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Do you think male drivers are just a bit more mental and less concerned about self-preservation than female drivers? Could account for those extra couple of tenths that make the difference. Obviously there will be exceptions to the rule, but it might be a thing. Men are just stupider and riskier!

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
jsf said:
TheDeuce said:
It's not about the destination it's about the journey.

Except in real life, where it's all about the destination smile
It's all about the money in these single make championships.
Money is a destination. Arguably the driving factor behind any sporting entrant in F1.

And I'm fine with that. If you have a passion, make it pay. You'll always be most successful if your job is a passion.

TheDeuce

13,917 posts

43 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Speed Badger said:
Do you think male drivers are just a bit more mental and less concerned about self-preservation than female drivers? Could account for those extra couple of tenths that make the difference. Obviously there will be exceptions to the rule, but it might be a thing. Men are just stupider and riskier!
Male bravado is definitely a factor, but it's just one of many things that tip the balance.

Men and women are different in several ways. There's no reason to expect or demand both sexes should be equal in practice within a single sphere of performance.