What F1 biography should I read?

What F1 biography should I read?

Author
Discussion

geeks

7,893 posts

119 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
gl20 said:
I should probably put this in the heretic thread, but I think the Damon Hill book is somewhat overrated. Bought it off the back of all the recommendations on here and perhaps my expectations were set too high, so just managing the OP’s!
I think thats fair, its good, not "I couldnt put it down good" but still good.

speedfr0g

44 posts

128 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
Hi

I am surprised it has been mentioned yet but the best book for me is Jackie Stewart's bio

So interesting regarding his racing career but everything he did during and after in business

Very inspiring

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2331618

Sheetmaself

5,276 posts

178 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
I thought , A Mechanics tale, was quite good.

Turn7

21,418 posts

201 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
NuisanceFactor said:
This, absolutely.....

Joey Deacon

5,743 posts

156 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
Flat Out, Flat Broke: Formula 1 The Hard Way by Perry McCarthy

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17318185-flat-...

coppice

7,439 posts

124 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
Damon Hill's book is that rarest of things , a book by a Grand Prix driver which goes far beyond the context of F1 . Clever, self aware and beautifully written. A book which comes close is by the coolest guy to sit in an F1 car, the late Peter Revson - Speed with Style .

David Tremayne writes beautifully and his book on Jim Clark is definitive. As is The Lost Generation , about Tony Brise , Tom Pryce and Roger Williamson , all of whom died before realising their potential . I'd seen all three drivers in action and the book reduced me to tears.

Anything by Richard Williams is a treat and although my real interest in F1 stems from the late 60s his books on Stirling Moss and (especially ) Richard Seaman are superb .

Lauda's books are excellent , especially his first -possibly because the Ferrari 312 T is so bloody gorgeous . The Art and Technicalities of Grand Prix Driving . Forget Maurice Hamilton's biography (a disappointment - skimpy and rushed ) and try Jon Saltinstall's terrific Niki Lauda , HIs Competition History .

Two left field books about lesser known drivers are Richard Jenkins' fascinating books on Richie Ginther and Mike Spence .

glazbagun

12,888 posts

177 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
As others have said, Hill's book is very good. Not so much about him vs Schumacher and more how on earth he ever ended up in an F1 car at all.

I really enjoyed Jackie Stewarts' until it got to where his career ended where it felt like a list of name dropping & became a chore. Can't imagine getting a dyslexia diagnosis so late though!

Gad-Westy

Original Poster:

12,627 posts

193 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
It seems I’ve got a lot of reading to do! I’ve just started on Marc Priestley’s book. Think Damon’s will be next then maybe JYS after that for a bit of variety.

trixical

900 posts

155 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
I enjoyed the different perspectives of some of the same era across Ross Brawn, Virginia Williams & Adrian Neweys books

I still need to read Laudas

cgt2

3,817 posts

168 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
Not sure it's available as an ebook but Donaldson's Villeneuve book.

Lauda To Hell and Back.

Both Sid Watkins books. I was lucky enough to know him. A lovely man, very much missed.

Edited by cgt2 on Friday 5th August 21:27

patmahe

5,532 posts

184 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
If you fancy going a little more old school you could look for a copy of Race without end by Maurice Hamilton, not a biography as such but a record of the Jordan team in their difficult 1992 season with Yamaha engines. Well written and a great insight into the life of a small team at that time.

Also I found Adrian Newey's book fascinating but I do have an engineering mindset.

BoRED S2upid

17,462 posts

220 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
The older the better IMO. It was proper racing back in the early years.

Simes205

4,223 posts

208 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
cjm said:
If you want something techy then this is pretty great, he comes across as a pretty difficult guy but had some great ideas that are still used in F1.

The Perfect Car: The story of John Barnard
His Very modest advances that are still used include carbon fibre tubs and the semi-automatic gearbox!!

This is a much much better book than Adrian Newey’s, much more technical too.


Edited by Simes205 on Friday 5th August 22:58

wibble cb

2,935 posts

187 months

Friday 5th August
quotequote all
Brundles book was good, he picked certain races and went through them, rather than a strict by the year type thing

Johnny Herbert’s- that fact he even got back into an F1 car was amazing- very sobering read

Damon’s was good as mentioned

Kimi’s was odd in its phrasing, but that could be down to translation issues!

Edited by wibble cb on Saturday 6th August 02:59

Piginapoke

3,592 posts

165 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
cgt2 said:
Not sure it's available as an ebook but Donaldson's Villeneuve book.
This.

LimaDelta

5,207 posts

198 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
For a slightly more left-field option, I enjoyed Colin Chapman: The Man and His Cars

coppice

7,439 posts

124 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
Karl Ludvigsen's book on Chapman is also wonderful. Colin Chapman - Inside the Innovator .

Anecdote alert - I interviewed Clive Chapman at Classic Team Lotus a few years ago . I had never sought an autograph before or since , but Colin Chapman was a god to me . I asked Clive if he'd sign the book - and he did, but with a propelling pencil . Curious , I thought , until Clive said 'That was one of dad's drawing pencils ..' Cue shiver down spine .

DeejRC

3,969 posts

62 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
Innes Ireland obviously.
Both Sid books
Mon Ami Mate

fizzwheel

130 posts

106 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
Agreed with the others Damon's book is really good, to go alongside it if you can find a copy of it then his dads is also a cracking read to.

Graham Hill "A life at the Limit"


Halmyre

9,933 posts

119 months

Saturday 6th August
quotequote all
coppice said:
David Tremayne writes beautifully and his book on Jim Clark is definitive.
I've got that - must read it sometime!

Jim Clark fans should get a copy of his race mechanic Cedric Selzer's book. A slim volume but great insight into what it was like at the F1 coal face in those days.

https://cedricselzer.jimdofree.com/

Proceeds go to Marie Curie Cancer Trust.

Also Eric Dymock's biography of Clark.