Are modern headlights too bright?

Are modern headlights too bright?

Poll: Are modern headlights too bright?

Total Members Polled: 712

Yes: 66%
No: 34%
Author
Discussion

Rawwr

22,722 posts

199 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Dr Doofenshmirtz said:
You know how when you were 4 you were told not to look directly at the sun?
Well the same applies to car headlights. You need to learn to look past the on coming headlights.
Once you have taught yourself to do this, rather than stare directly into the light you won't have any more problems.
You don't actually need to. The brightness of the light will affect the perception of contrast. The brighter the lightsource is, the darker everything around it will look and, in this instance, we're talking about the opposing driver's view of the road ahead. People perceive that contrast differently, some worse than others, but everyone will suffer it to some degree.

Bebee

4,582 posts

190 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Some are too bright for sure but high set brake lights are a problem in traffic, I use my sun visor to block the them if I can.

fangio

988 posts

199 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
I just don't understand why anyone needs such wcensoreder lights. Do people actually need to drive that fast? Even with them, a deer can still get you! frown

The advantage of sensitive eyes is that you can see perfectly well with halogens, if it wasn't for the HID tossers coming the other way!mad

As has been pointed out, the maximum wattage law in this country was to create an even playing field. Now the eu's fcensoreded it up!

bicycleshorts

1,938 posts

126 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
My sister passed her test last year, there were 4 of us in her car, I asked if she'd adjusted the headlights for the number of passengers. She had no idea what this meant, that it was possible, or how you would go about doing it.

I suspect this is the potential reason for 'overly bright' headlights.

anonymous-user

Original Poster:

19 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
fangio said:
Do people actually need to drive that fast?
Not sure what you mean? scratchchin
There should be a law for this though.

Skater12

504 posts

123 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Until brands fit auto-dipping / dimming lights to ALL their new cars, the newer HID lights will ps off loads of people.
The simple fact is although they are bright, they can be seen more clearly in a range of weather conditions, making driving in general safer.
LED running lights are the way forward for now in my opinion, as they still catch your attention, without being overly distracting.

Cyder

6,804 posts

185 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
MarkRSi said:
Cyder said:
Apparently the customer wants that sharp cut off of light though, so don't expect to see it change any time soon. frown
Really? Since when? confused
Apparently so, it gives a perception of a higher quality of light to the driver of the car according the marketability bods who sit at the other end of the office from me.

It could be 'smoothed' to create a gradual drop off instead but they don't like that I believe.

RemainAllHoof

71,566 posts

247 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
It's a distraction on normal roads but worse on tight roads where you can't see fk all in terms of where the edge of their car is especially if it's a 4x4 (ie a wall of light), so I just slow down and take a guess, letting the other driver make adjustments as he's the only one that can see. irked

anonymous-user

Original Poster:

19 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Cyder said:
MarkRSi said:
Cyder said:
Apparently the customer wants that sharp cut off of light though, so don't expect to see it change any time soon. frown
Really? Since when? confused
Apparently so, it gives a perception of a higher quality of light to the driver of the car according the marketability bods who sit at the other end of the office from me.

It could be 'smoothed' to create a gradual drop off instead but they don't like that I believe.
Mainly the people who buy white Audis and BMWs then put huge alloys on and blacked out windows I'm guessing.

sharpfocus

13,718 posts

156 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Brighter lights mean you can see further, they're fundamentally a good thing for drivers.

The only down side is having them shine in the eyes of oncoming drivers, which I can't see being a problem that technology shouldn't be able to resolve - i.e. it's not bright lights that are the problem, but poor configuration / auto-levelling / whatever.

kambites

61,329 posts

186 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
You don't want auto-levelling, you want road tracking so the headlight beam cut-off tracks the road fifty feet (or whatever) in front of the car.

budgie smuggler

4,295 posts

124 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Quite annoying. Especially the big swinging ballbags in RR sports who 'overtake' (sit beside) you on a DC. So much glare from the wing & rear view mirrors that your night vision gets completely wrecked.

sharpfocus

13,718 posts

156 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
kambites said:
You don't want auto-levelling, you want road tracking so the headlight beam cut-off tracks the road fifty feet (or whatever) in front of the car.
Agreed.

Steffan

10,362 posts

193 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
If every road user maintained their vehicle correctly and drove with reasonable consideration for other road users the modern ultra bright lights would be less of a nuisance.

Fact is many motorists are not considerate and do not maintain their cars.

In the reality of the way life is these lights are therefore a damned nuisance.

kambites

61,329 posts

186 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
sharpfocus said:
kambites said:
You don't want auto-levelling, you want road tracking so the headlight beam cut-off tracks the road fifty feet (or whatever) in front of the car.
Agreed.
Thinking about it, this doesn't actually sound like it should be that hard to achieve to me. I wonder why it hasn't been done? Would it be legal?

Pothole

32,832 posts

247 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
MarkRSi said:
Cyder said:
Apparently the customer wants that sharp cut off of light though, so don't expect to see it change any time soon. frown
Really? Since when? confused
Since manufacturers told them they did...

Pothole

32,832 posts

247 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
bicycleshorts said:
My sister passed her test last year, there were 4 of us in her car, I asked if she'd adjusted the headlights for the number of passengers. She had no idea what this meant, that it was possible, or how you would go about doing it.

I suspect this is the potential reason for 'overly bright' headlights.
the reason for a few, I'm sure. Stupidity is the reason for many of life's irritations, after all, especially on the roads.

ajprice

20,362 posts

161 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
It's not really a problem on my car, the beam and cut off are both fine. But a few weeks ago I was driving at night, with a friends car in front of me. They could recognise my car around the other car headlights because the beams from my car were meeting at a point at the end of the beam pattern instead of being two parallel beams. Does this really matter and is it something that can get sorted at a garage or somewhere like Demon Tweeks? (local to me)

y2blade

56,029 posts

180 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all

"PistonHeads.crying about LEDs/FOGs matter"

rolleyes

Mr E

19,824 posts

224 months

Monday 14th November 2011
quotequote all
Herman Toothrot said:
Thats because they drive people carriers or big off roaders not low sports cars. Anyone who drives anything low like an Elise etc will have issue with the super bright lights.
I sometimes struggle in the Elise. Not a problem in the barge, I suspect because I'm higher.