Dealers who use self-tappers to fit number plates - why?

Dealers who use self-tappers to fit number plates - why?

Author
Discussion

vx220

2,631 posts

215 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Couple of points...

Easier for scum to steal plates with tape

Conversely, more time consuming to change plates with tape.

Stainless reacts with mild steel and can cause corrosion, so stainless screws not a solution


Impasse

15,099 posts

222 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
On my threaded insert point, I'm reminded that the thread for the rear towing-eye sits behind the number plate on my Aston. Should I need recovery from a muddy spectator paddock at a rainy Brands, then it's an easy job to unscrew the number plate, attach the towing eye and clip on the tow rope.
Not so sure I'd like to do battle with industrial strength sticky tape in the pouring rain and then go searching for something to reattach the plate for the journey home.

DonkeyApple

46,038 posts

150 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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LouD86 said:
I use 3m double sided plate tape on a roll for my cars. Helps being in the trade.
How? Is there specialist training and years of on the job experience required to be able to handle double sided sticky tape without killing yourself or others? wink

Denis O

2,128 posts

224 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Not only are screws a pain, the donuts that put the plates on pissed are an equal pain.

Haven't people ever heard of a spirit level FFS.

Mercury00

3,930 posts

137 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Even worse - wonky plates on new cars. I see it all the time.


Denis O said:
Haven't people ever heard of a spirit level FFS.
If they'd used a spirit level then that would explain why the plate was wonky... do you know how a spirit level works?

Sensibleboy

1,061 posts

106 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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Ari said:
Mercedes plates should be fitted into Mercedes plate holders which are attached using four screws (invisible as hidden by plates).

Sometimes dumbarses just screw the plates straight to the car without using the holders, hence the four screws on show that you've seen.
4 rusty screws normally! Look terrible on relatively new prestige cars.

Mr2Mike

20,143 posts

236 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Mercury00 said:
If they'd used a spirit level then that would explain why the plate was wonky... do you know how a spirit level works?
You have to use the spirit level on the car first, and put shims under the wheels to to get it level hehe

PositronicRay

24,400 posts

164 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Usually self tappers are used into plastics, no rust issue. If the plate has to bend to fit the curve of a bumper then stickers do not last very well.

Riley Blue

Original Poster:

19,235 posts

207 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
PositronicRay said:
Usually self tappers are used into plastics, no rust issue. If the plate has to bend to fit the curve of a bumper then stickers do not last very well.
A stuck on plate lasted 13 years on the front of my Audi's curved bumper and would have lasted longer if I hadn't removed it.

AJB

856 posts

196 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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spikey78 said:
Because the mechanics don't care-i used to be one so I know. We got a certain amount of time to PDI a car, the quickest way to fit plates is to wizz a couple of holes through the plate and the panel and screw it straight on.
Surely the quickest way is just to use a bit of double sided tape and not bother with drills or screws at all?

Going against the grain of this thread, I always feel like sticky tape is the quick and easy way, and screws are a better job as long as they're screws that don't instantly go rusty. Most cars I've had have nylon inserts in the tailgate designed to take screws, so it certainly won't make the tailgate rust.

And I always think the Mercs with 4 screws are even less of a bodge job - partly 4 screws holds the plate even more securely, and partly they normally use exposed screws that don't rust instead of rusty screws covered in a plastic cap. (Plus it reminds me of my old W123 whenever I notice them!).

Denis O

2,128 posts

224 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Mercury00 said:
Even worse - wonky plates on new cars. I see it all the time.


Denis O said:
Haven't people ever heard of a spirit level FFS.
If they'd used a spirit level then that would explain why the plate was wonky... do you know how a spirit level works?
I take as a given that the car is on level ground when you do the work.

SkinnyPete

1,291 posts

130 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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Not to bothered about screws on a white appliance kind of car but I despair them in something special because I like to remove the front plate and I can't if some chump has drilled the fk out of the front bumper.

anonymous-user

35 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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I've never heard of number plate screws causing rusting. Sounds like an Internet myth.
9 times out of 10 the front bumpers are plastic. The rear bootlid etc invariably has a screw point from factory. Never seen the rears randomly screwed into the metal!

anonymous-user

35 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Denis O said:
Not only are screws a pain, the donuts that put the plates on pissed are an equal pain.

Haven't people ever heard of a spirit level FFS.
You'll need to go a long way with the spirit level to find a flat road first!

liner33

10,054 posts

183 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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I got told by a copper that stuck on plates weren't legal as they are so easily changed LOL smile

I hate it as well , the screws do rust but after 3 or 4 years my plates start to de laminate anyhow


BrownBottle

1,311 posts

117 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Jimboka said:
Denis O said:
Not only are screws a pain, the donuts that put the plates on pissed are an equal pain.

Haven't people ever heard of a spirit level FFS.
You'll need to go a long way with the spirit level to find a flat road first!
Yes because PDI's are always done in the middle of the road...



glasgowrob

2,963 posts

102 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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Breaks my heart


We picked up our new car this month. Only to find the dealer monkeys have used 4 bit self tappers in each plate

Utter trumpets


PlayersNo6

1,102 posts

137 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
Mercs have had 4 screws for front and rear plates for years. The screw holders behind are designed in so you're not puncturing the tailgate. As already said the screws tend to be stainless torx head as well. One of the easier plates to change as they don't rust in over the years.

Tape is no good for curved front bumpers or rears where the screw mounts are raised. On a flat, clean surface the correct tape is very strong however.

My pet hate - new cars with wonky no. plates.

Riktoid

231 posts

93 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
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A million times worse is number plates that aren't quite straight. I had a car a few years ago with this. At first glance it looks fine but once you notice it your eye is always drawn to it.

If I ever had the opportunity to buy a brand new car and the number plate wasn't attached perfectly plumb level, I would go bananas. I'd probably reject it!

alecescolme

2,127 posts

105 months

Saturday 11th April 2015
quotequote all
I screw on all my number plates on. My reasons:
-Will never fall of, I have had issues with the self adhesive ones working loose
-Easy to change when adding/removing private plate
-Leaves no sticky mess to clean off when changing plates.

I do not drill new holes into bodywork, I use the ones pre-drilled by the manufacturer, then I measure accurately to the mm the existing holes and transfer them onto the plate. I also use colour coded caps for neatness. Perfect straightness guaranteed.