RE: Lamborghini Huracan LP610-4: Revisited

RE: Lamborghini Huracan LP610-4: Revisited

Author
Discussion

franki68

8,541 posts

193 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Weird reaction,I had a gallardo spider for 2 years and never had one bad comment ,or gesture ,in fact the incessant praise became wearisome after a while ,people would come up
To the car when it was stationary and tell
Me how much they loved it.if the roof was down they would actually put their head into the car 'oh man that is so cool' etc

Baryonyx

17,386 posts

131 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Gus265 said:
I was already getting bored but totally lost interest in this article at "16.2:1 is not as good as 11.9:1...steering angles...some other numbers about steering racks...etc etc". Is it rubbish or not please? As a punter I don't have the time to understand what this means and it just sounds like you are trying to be clever. Great to be able to compare lots of different cars all day but keep it real please. You might aswell have written in Latin.
As for the car, I love Lambos but I can't work out why this one doesn't quite work. Is it unfair to say the front looks like a squashed mid 2000s Citroen Picasso?!
If you can't understand this simple example of some data in it's raw form, go and educate yourself instead of expecting everything to be dumbed down to your level. There is nothing complex about this.

jeremyc

19,984 posts

256 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
leglessAlex said:
jeremyc said:
4. The indicator switch on the steering wheel is plain daft.
Harry Metcalfe had one for a review, and while he said that indicators being on the wheel anywhere is worse than on a stalk, he reckoned that the system Lambo has is way better than Ferraris.

Have you driven any of the new Ferrari cars, is there any truth to that?

I'm guessing that manufacturers will eventually try and put everything on the steering wheel, might as well know which set ups are the best (or the least bad?).
I haven't driven one of the new Ferraris; please send one over and I'll provide a full report on the indicators. biggrin

The main problem with the Hurican (and I guess many other) steering wheel mounted controls is encountered when you are looking to leave a roundabout with more than about 90 degrees of lock on: working out where the switch is and which way to push it to indicate for your exit is not intuitive.

neil1jnr

1,356 posts

127 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
It looks like a lamborghini should, nice and aggresive, just wait for a more hardcore version with a wing, that would be my choice smile.

I am surprised those wheels are an expensive optional extra as I think it's the only style I've seen these new Huracans with?

gregalfa

23 posts

109 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
If It was a Muira in this colour I would be very green with envy. Alas, this looks and sounds like an Audi on steriods. Even the styling of the Lambo is becoming a bit Audi generic. The Muira, Espada, Countach and Jarama looked unique. This? Another expensive Lambo.

DonkeyApple

42,399 posts

141 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
confucuis said:
Those pops and crackles from the exhaust, are they real or fabricated like the Jag F-type?
Pops and crackles are a result normally of running a batch-fire injection system. I imagine for economy purposes all mosern cars are sequential injection so the pops and crackles have to be artificially simulated by releasing fuel on the over run.

Along with artificial steering inputs and automatically changing up when in manual mode, modern cars seem more and more an empty parody of the past. And all because they want to sell as many as possible so dumb them down so that the most base mong can steer one.


Dan Trent

1,866 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
jeremyc said:
leglessAlex said:
jeremyc said:
4. The indicator switch on the steering wheel is plain daft.
Harry Metcalfe had one for a review, and while he said that indicators being on the wheel anywhere is worse than on a stalk, he reckoned that the system Lambo has is way better than Ferraris.

Have you driven any of the new Ferrari cars, is there any truth to that?

I'm guessing that manufacturers will eventually try and put everything on the steering wheel, might as well know which set ups are the best (or the least bad?).
I haven't driven one of the new Ferraris; please send one over and I'll provide a full report on the indicators. biggrin

The main problem with the Hurican (and I guess many other) steering wheel mounted controls is encountered when you are looking to leave a roundabout with more than about 90 degrees of lock on: working out where the switch is and which way to push it to indicate for your exit is not intuitive.
Having been lucky enough to drive both the Lambo system is a lot better than the Ferrari one in all but the situation Jeremy describes of having the wheel 'upside down' and having to swap indications to exit. Ironically this is more of a problem without the Dynamic Steering as with LDS you probably won't have turned the wheel as much!

The Ferrari system of having a separate button on each side does at least mean you're instinctively pressing 'left for left and right for right' but I've found it annoyingly inconsistent and downright irritating. Sometimes you get three flashes, sometimes it stays on and even in many miles I've not yet been able to figure out what duration of press or whatever else is required for one of the other.

Argument for both systems is that you can have nice big fixed shifter paddles that you can reach easily whichever position the wheel is in, though you'll notice from the Aventador SV 'ring lap the driver is still having to move his hand round the wheel to get the upshift in on corner exit. I'd prefer on the wheel for that, with due deference to the idea that you 'shouldn't' be shifting in corners if going by the book.

Cheers,

Dan

Dan Trent

1,866 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
confucuis said:
Those pops and crackles from the exhaust, are they real or fabricated like the Jag F-type?
Pops and crackles are a result normally of running a batch-fire injection system. I imagine for economy purposes all mosern cars are sequential injection so the pops and crackles have to be artificially simulated by releasing fuel on the over run.

Along with artificial steering inputs and automatically changing up when in manual mode, modern cars seem more and more an empty parody of the past. And all because they want to sell as many as possible so dumb them down so that the most base mong can steer one.
Huracan runs both direct and indirect injection for best of both worlds but either way the crackles would seem to me to be 'artificial'.

Cheers,

Dan

sone

4,506 posts

210 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
I have a Huracan, with the dreaded assisted steering and to be honest I don't actually notice it now I've done a couple of thousand miles.
Previous car was an Aventador but to be honest the gearbox in the H makes the Aventador feel like a tractor! I loved the Aventador in every way apart from the way it lurched in low gears and changed gear completely randomly at times. I'd compare it too a 360 F1 in terms of gearbox technology or at least that's how it felt. If Lambo could fit a twin clutch into the Aventador chassis they'd fit it!, I don't believe the soulful feel tripe for a second.
Anyway this is about the Huracan, I've owned 360, 360CS 430, 430 Scud, 458 etc and the Huracan is by far the most fun to drive on the road. There's no doub't in my mind it's quicker than all of the above (including the Aventador) and the gearbox is sublime! I thought the gearbox in the 458 was unbeatable but I was wrong, in sport mode the gear change in the H is almost unnoticeable. When I drove the 458 at the Fiorano, my only comment as feedback was that the steering was too higher ratio and the throttle too sensitive. For me the Huracan steering feels much like the 458's at high speed but it's something your brain soon re-calibrates.
I've tried to make the car understeer on the road but to be honest when you get to this sort of limit you're putting everyone at risk such is the pace.
The British media haven't exactly taken to the Huracan and I'm a little surprised really after all as Lambo's always been a bit mad and I believe this is the first really good production car they've made.
But each to their own and I think it's brill!

Steve

supercampeao

211 posts

139 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
I have to say, I quite like the way it looks - v impressive in the flesh/metal.

Nice to hear from an owner steve/Sone, esp one that can compare it to the benchmark 458. Tends to make me think that in the real world, the H is going to be a pretty good car given it still has that n/a noise, plenty of speed and the fact that understeer is not really going to bother most of us mere mortals driving on public roads!

exceed

453 posts

148 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Oh my, if they release a balboni edition they have my order. I need a special edition. Hurry up Lamborghini, Lambo London is waiting on me!!

DonkeyApple

42,399 posts

141 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Dan Trent said:
DonkeyApple said:
confucuis said:
Those pops and crackles from the exhaust, are they real or fabricated like the Jag F-type?
Pops and crackles are a result normally of running a batch-fire injection system. I imagine for economy purposes all mosern cars are sequential injection so the pops and crackles have to be artificially simulated by releasing fuel on the over run.

Along with artificial steering inputs and automatically changing up when in manual mode, modern cars seem more and more an empty parody of the past. And all because they want to sell as many as possible so dumb them down so that the most base mong can steer one.
Huracan runs both direct and indirect injection for best of both worlds but either way the crackles would seem to me to be 'artificial'.

Cheers,

Dan
Thanks.

What would be the benefits of this apart from creating great noise?

Is there a genuine application?

swisstoni

11,870 posts

251 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
jeremyc said:
leglessAlex said:
jeremyc said:
4. The indicator switch on the steering wheel is plain daft.
Harry Metcalfe had one for a review, and while he said that indicators being on the wheel anywhere is worse than on a stalk, he reckoned that the system Lambo has is way better than Ferraris.

Have you driven any of the new Ferrari cars, is there any truth to that?

I'm guessing that manufacturers will eventually try and put everything on the steering wheel, might as well know which set ups are the best (or the least bad?).
I haven't driven one of the new Ferraris; please send one over and I'll provide a full report on the indicators. biggrin

The main problem with the Hurican (and I guess many other) steering wheel mounted controls is encountered when you are looking to leave a roundabout with more than about 90 degrees of lock on: working out where the switch is and which way to push it to indicate for your exit is not intuitive.
For the spacially challenged I can imagine that could be a massive issue.

sideways sid

1,242 posts

187 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
So, I was standing in the garden, in shorts with my hands on my hips....

smile

Vee12V

1,118 posts

132 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Strangely the looks don't do it for me, but the sound is definitely its USP.

Imho Lambo shouldn't play it as safe as it doen to differentiate it enough from the R8. And at least make them all RWD!

Dan Trent

1,866 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
What would be the benefits of this apart from creating great noise?

Is there a genuine application?
There is, complete with a suitably fancy sounding Italian description! Let me hand over to the press pack...

Lamborghini bumph said:
One groundbreaking innovation of the V10 is the dual fuel injection, known as “Iniezione Diretta Stratificata”. On start-up and under higher loads and revs, a common-rail system injects fuel at a pressure of up to 180 bar directly into the combustion chambers. This results in intense swirl, which has the effect of cooling the cylinder walls and permits a higher compression ratio of 12.7:1. At lower loads, fuel is injected indirectly into the manifold, which reduces fuel consumption and particulate emissions. At medium loads and revs, both injection systems work together. The V10 already complies with the limits set in the EU6 standard.
Cheers,

Dan

mat205125

16,343 posts

185 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Dan Trent said:
DonkeyApple said:
confucuis said:
Those pops and crackles from the exhaust, are they real or fabricated like the Jag F-type?
Pops and crackles are a result normally of running a batch-fire injection system. I imagine for economy purposes all mosern cars are sequential injection so the pops and crackles have to be artificially simulated by releasing fuel on the over run.

Along with artificial steering inputs and automatically changing up when in manual mode, modern cars seem more and more an empty parody of the past. And all because they want to sell as many as possible so dumb them down so that the most base mong can steer one.
Huracan runs both direct and indirect injection for best of both worlds but either way the crackles would seem to me to be 'artificial'.

Cheers,

Dan
Do they add to the performance? NO

Are they an unavoidable by-product of the design of the engine and exhaust? NO

Could they be quickly and easily engineered out with some mapping adjustments? YES

Have they been deliberately mapped into the ECU(s), with consideration given into the acoustics of the exhaust? ABSOfkINGLUTELY!

DonkeyApple

42,399 posts

141 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Dan Trent said:
DonkeyApple said:
What would be the benefits of this apart from creating great noise?

Is there a genuine application?
There is, complete with a suitably fancy sounding Italian description! Let me hand over to the press pack...

Lamborghini bumph said:
One groundbreaking innovation of the V10 is the dual fuel injection, known as “Iniezione Diretta Stratificata”. On start-up and under higher loads and revs, a common-rail system injects fuel at a pressure of up to 180 bar directly into the combustion chambers. This results in intense swirl, which has the effect of cooling the cylinder walls and permits a higher compression ratio of 12.7:1. At lower loads, fuel is injected indirectly into the manifold, which reduces fuel consumption and particulate emissions. At medium loads and revs, both injection systems work together. The V10 already complies with the limits set in the EU6 standard.
Cheers,

Dan
Interesting to think that fuel dumped in the manifold is more efficient and burns cleaner at lighter loads than direct injection. It's a weird science at that level.

However, I would counter Lambo's claim of it being an innovation. When we were restoring my TVR we found a secondary fuel rail in the induction box and when talking to the ex factory worker who ran the Le Mans race project he said they fitted them so that on the Mulsanne Straight they could dump more fuel in at top revs and peak load to prevent over heating or damage from running lean.

Looks like the boffins at VAG ripped off some some Blackpool blokes in a shed. biggrin

Gooly

918 posts

120 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Gus265 said:
I was already getting bored but totally lost interest in this article at "16.2:1 is not as good as 11.9:1...steering angles...some other numbers about steering racks...etc etc". Is it rubbish or not please? As a punter I don't have the time to understand what this means and it just sounds like you are trying to be clever. Great to be able to compare lots of different cars all day but keep it real please. You might aswell have written in Latin.
As for the car, I love Lambos but I can't work out why this one doesn't quite work. Is it unfair to say the front looks like a squashed mid 2000s Citroen Picasso?!
Basic maths, the lower the number on the left side of the ratio, the quicker the steering rack is.

jeremyc

19,984 posts

256 months

Thursday 18th June 2015
quotequote all
Dan Trent said:
Having been lucky enough to drive both the Lambo system is a lot better than the Ferrari one in all but the situation Jeremy describes of having the wheel 'upside down' and having to swap indications to exit. Ironically this is more of a problem without the Dynamic Steering as with LDS you probably won't have turned the wheel as much!

The Ferrari system of having a separate button on each side does at least mean you're instinctively pressing 'left for left and right for right' but I've found it annoyingly inconsistent and downright irritating. Sometimes you get three flashes, sometimes it stays on and even in many miles I've not yet been able to figure out what duration of press or whatever else is required for one of the other.

Argument for both systems is that you can have nice big fixed shifter paddles that you can reach easily whichever position the wheel is in, though you'll notice from the Aventador SV 'ring lap the driver is still having to move his hand round the wheel to get the upshift in on corner exit. I'd prefer on the wheel for that, with due deference to the idea that you 'shouldn't' be shifting in corners if going by the book.
The answer is simple: have a manual gearbox to obviate the need for paddles. winkhehe

Alternatively, why not make the paddles capable of being moved up & down a small amount (as well as pull): this could operate the indicators on one side and wipers the other. thumbup I'll just wait for the call from the automotive manufacturers to license my idea. smile