What happens to vehicles involved in crimes.

What happens to vehicles involved in crimes.

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anonymous-user

Original Poster:

55 months

Tuesday 11th April 2017
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Hopefully this hasn't been done to death already... and I know small details like this have little relevance in subjects like the tragic death of April Jones a few years ago..

I want to know what happens to criminals' cars. For example the vile Mark Bridger stuffed poor April in to the back of his Disco. Which I have just noticed is imported, very old, LHD and no doubt dodgy as fk just like him. DVLA say it's untaxed and no MOT (obviously! Due December 2012). Bridger bought the car on 3rd December 2010, car imported October 2010. I'm guessing this car is rotting away in a Police warehouse or been crushed. Deserved.

Rettendon murders. Numerous cars have been regd with the same number plate. No-one knows where the true car is; on the road or long since dead?

I guess it's the same story with fatal car accident involved cars. I don't know why it intrigues me.


Anyone got any info on what happens and any other details on cars involved in crimes? Not necessarily murder. I don't know why it intrigues me

Equus

16,980 posts

102 months

Tuesday 11th April 2017
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I had a mate whose bike was used in an armed robbery.

He'd sold it to a breaker some months before, after crashing it (the cost of the fairings was such that it was not economic to repair).

Somebody had spent a lot of time and money restoring it to pristine condition but had never registered it in their name, so as far as the Police were concerned it still belonged to my mate. Once they had established that he had no involvement in the robbery, they simply gave it back to him.

horsemeatscandal

1,261 posts

105 months

Tuesday 11th April 2017
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This reminds me of that Evo they had on Top Gear that they destroyed at the end of the episode because it had belonged to a drug dealer who'd been locked up or something or other.


-Michael-

4,079 posts

176 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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Didn't the "Essex Boys" Range Rover, get put back on the road after their sticky ending? scratchchin

cj2013

1,409 posts

127 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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I'm sure there is, or used to be, a police auction for these kinds of things

Henno196

90 posts

93 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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cj2013 said:
I'm sure there is, or used to be, a police auction for these kinds of things
I've bought stuff from a police assets auction, there were a few cars there. Not sure what happens to the more gruesome cars, I thought the only police auction were criminal asset auctions to recoup some funds.

Edited by Henno196 on Wednesday 12th April 02:58

caelite

4,280 posts

113 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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Henno196 said:
cj2013 said:
I'm sure there is, or used to be, a police auction for these kinds of things
I've bought stuff from a police assets auction, there were a few cars there. Not sure what happens to the more gruesome cars, I thought the only police auction were criminal asset auctions to recoup some funds.

Edited by Henno196 on Wednesday 12th April 02:58
The more gruesome ones tend to be destroyed... or exported. This is what the catagory A write off is used for, normally where death is involved (accidental or otherwise) catagory A is used.

h3nde

107 posts

90 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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I used to work for a salvage firm a few years ago. If a vehicle was involved in an accident where an occupant died then it would be marked as a total loss category A or B depending on the severity of the damage. I remember two vehicles, one a MK5 Fiesta that needed no more than new headlights and a bumper but the driver (old lady) didn't make it so the car cannot be re sold as a whole, however un damaged parts can be salvaged and re sold. The other vehicle was an early 2000's transit that had been involved in a side impact with a 40 tonne truck doing 60mph so it was a cat A because the transit occupants didn't make it and the van was obviously obliterated! So in short, the vehicles as a whole won't (or shouldn't be) on the road but their parts may be (not the shell though) provided it went through the police/ insurance correctly. Hope that answers your question. Sorry for the novel I've written here

steveo3002

10,546 posts

175 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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what about the mccanns rental car ? is someone rocking about in that now?

cj2013

1,409 posts

127 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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h3nde said:
I used to work for a salvage firm a few years ago. If a vehicle was involved in an accident where an occupant died then it would be marked as a total loss category A or B depending on the severity of the damage. I remember two vehicles, one a MK5 Fiesta that needed no more than new headlights and a bumper but the driver (old lady) didn't make it so the car cannot be re sold as a whole, however un damaged parts can be salvaged and re sold. The other vehicle was an early 2000's transit that had been involved in a side impact with a 40 tonne truck doing 60mph so it was a cat A because the transit occupants didn't make it and the van was obviously obliterated! So in short, the vehicles as a whole won't (or shouldn't be) on the road but their parts may be (not the shell though) provided it went through the police/ insurance correctly. Hope that answers your question. Sorry for the novel I've written here
I bought a 206 from an auction (not cheap either) about 7 or 8 years ago now, and did a car check when I got it home (after seeing signs of filler on most panels). It came up that it was a Cat A write-off when it was about 3 weeks old.

Auction house (who I'd paid a £50 "indemnity fee" to cover such things) told me to get stuffed because "What is the previous owner supposed to do with it?".

I had to get trading standards involved before they would budge. I didn't learn, as the next week they sold me a "stolen" 306 banghead

MorganP104

2,605 posts

131 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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Somewhat related, but many years ago, I received a call from South Wales police, asking me about a car I used to own.

Copper: "Did you own a vehicle with registration [PLATE]?"
Me: "Yes, I did, scrapped it about 6 months ago."
Copper: "Ah, was the car a Peugeot 309?"
Me: "Nope, it was a Ford Escort."
Copper: "OK, I see what's happened here..."
Me: "Oh yes?"
Copper: "A 309 bearing [PLATE] was used in a series of shop ram raids in South Wales. Looks to be a ringer. Criminals go to scrapyards and write down any visible numberplates they can see, have them made up, and use them on stolen cars".

This was back in the day, before you needed to give your passport, mortgage papers, and inside leg measurement to get numberplates made up.

Never heard from the police again.

h3nde

107 posts

90 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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cj2013 said:
h3nde said:
I used to work for a salvage firm a few years ago. If a vehicle was involved in an accident where an occupant died then it would be marked as a total loss category A or B depending on the severity of the damage. I remember two vehicles, one a MK5 Fiesta that needed no more than new headlights and a bumper but the driver (old lady) didn't make it so the car cannot be re sold as a whole, however un damaged parts can be salvaged and re sold. The other vehicle was an early 2000's transit that had been involved in a side impact with a 40 tonne truck doing 60mph so it was a cat A because the transit occupants didn't make it and the van was obviously obliterated! So in short, the vehicles as a whole won't (or shouldn't be) on the road but their parts may be (not the shell though) provided it went through the police/ insurance correctly. Hope that answers your question. Sorry for the novel I've written here
I bought a 206 from an auction (not cheap either) about 7 or 8 years ago now, and did a car check when I got it home (after seeing signs of filler on most panels). It came up that it was a Cat A write-off when it was about 3 weeks old.

Auction house (who I'd paid a £50 "indemnity fee" to cover such things) told me to get stuffed because "What is the previous owner supposed to do with it?".

I had to get trading standards involved before they would budge. I didn't learn, as the next week they sold me a "stolen" 306 banghead
Oh no! If they go through the system correctly this wouldn't happen but obviously some cars with cloned registrations/ chassis numbers are a lot harder to pick up on. I did however hear a story from one of the blokes there about a slightly unsavoury chap who bought a lot of damaged cars/ parts from the company. Apparently he bought a Porsche 911 with front end damage and then a few months later another 911 this time with rear damage! I can only assume (not that I'm judging by his character) the cars may have been cut in two and welded up to make one good car!

bristolracer

5,553 posts

150 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
quotequote all
h3nde said:
I used to work for a salvage firm a few years ago. If a vehicle was involved in an accident where an occupant died then it would be marked as a total loss category A or B depending on the severity of the damage. I remember two vehicles, one a MK5 Fiesta that needed no more than new headlights and a bumper but the driver (old lady) didn't make it so the car cannot be re sold as a whole, however un damaged parts can be salvaged and re sold. The other vehicle was an early 2000's transit that had been involved in a side impact with a 40 tonne truck doing 60mph so it was a cat A because the transit occupants didn't make it and the van was obviously obliterated! So in short, the vehicles as a whole won't (or shouldn't be) on the road but their parts may be (not the shell though) provided it went through the police/ insurance correctly. Hope that answers your question. Sorry for the novel I've written here
Theres often a few on ebay that state "parts only we are unable to sell complete car" some of them look repairable.

Its funny how we are about these things,death in a car writes the car off,yet we quite happily buy houses which in all probability somebody has died in.

cbmotorsport

3,065 posts

119 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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-Michael- said:
Didn't the "Essex Boys" Range Rover, get put back on the road after their sticky ending? scratchchin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfbpBe5-vZo

cj2013

1,409 posts

127 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
quotequote all
h3nde said:
Oh no! If they go through the system correctly this wouldn't happen but obviously some cars with cloned registrations/ chassis numbers are a lot harder to pick up on. I did however hear a story from one of the blokes there about a slightly unsavoury chap who bought a lot of damaged cars/ parts from the company. Apparently he bought a Porsche 911 with front end damage and then a few months later another 911 this time with rear damage! I can only assume (not that I'm judging by his character) the cars may have been cut in two and welded up to make one good car!
I entered the reg and got the same info, so I can wholeheartedly assure you it was just a bunch of C's who ran said auction house.


The 306 cab was an odd one - it was outstanding stolen from 7 years earlier when I did the check. I paid the company who did the check to do some legwork (hoping to have the marker removed due to an error), but they found out Norwich Union had paid out on it already, and were flabbergasted that it could have been fixed, based on the damage (which I didn't see). They added it to the register on the spot as a Cat C.

Auction house refused to refund, so I had to sell it on for a pittance (fully disclosed on ebay as to the story). The issue wasn't helped by the fact that someone sliced the roof open one weekend, and I had to sew it back up as a temporary fix.

jatinder

1,667 posts

214 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
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My brother brought from salvage a BMW 1 series that had been torn apart from the drug squad. In attempt to put it back together and sell for a profit.

Took a while and had clearly been over a few kerbs at speed in its lifetime.

He did a good job, but didn't make any money on that one!

h3nde

107 posts

90 months

Wednesday 12th April 2017
quotequote all
cj2013 said:
h3nde said:
Oh no! If they go through the system correctly this wouldn't happen but obviously some cars with cloned registrations/ chassis numbers are a lot harder to pick up on. I did however hear a story from one of the blokes there about a slightly unsavoury chap who bought a lot of damaged cars/ parts from the company. Apparently he bought a Porsche 911 with front end damage and then a few months later another 911 this time with rear damage! I can only assume (not that I'm judging by his character) the cars may have been cut in two and welded up to make one good car!
I entered the reg and got the same info, so I can wholeheartedly assure you it was just a bunch of C's who ran said auction house.


The 306 cab was an odd one - it was outstanding stolen from 7 years earlier when I did the check. I paid the company who did the check to do some legwork (hoping to have the marker removed due to an error), but they found out Norwich Union had paid out on it already, and were flabbergasted that it could have been fixed, based on the damage (which I didn't see). They added it to the register on the spot as a Cat C.

Auction house refused to refund, so I had to sell it on for a pittance (fully disclosed on ebay as to the story). The issue wasn't helped by the fact that someone sliced the roof open one weekend, and I had to sew it back up as a temporary fix.
Yeah I think you summed it up! Just a bunch of C's! Places like Motorhog that are safe and garuantee the car is legit are good places to go if you fancy picking up and fixing a damaged car