The Joy of Running an Old Shed

The Joy of Running an Old Shed

Author
Discussion

Davie

3,220 posts

173 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
Sheddy V70 D5 is no more...

I've had five, this one promised lots but I just never gelled with it. At 248,000 miles it just felt baggy and worn out and would have easily consumed lots if time and money to put right but probably never really be right.

Part exchanged it on Friday for a newer, non shed XC70 though the irony is said sheddy V70 did the 410 miles without any drama and I got out wondering if it was a good move. But, it's done and I don't think I'd go back to a V70 in the future. Great cars but at an age where their age is showing and a tired one can be hard to run with shed ethos in mind.

Still have the V50 so still shedding with it... and I'd be loathed to give up on it, it's just been brilliant whereas the V70, wasn't.

Bonefish Blues

16,303 posts

181 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
Davie said:
Sheddy V70 D5 is no more...

I've had five, this one promised lots but I just never gelled with it. At 248,000 miles it just felt baggy and worn out and would have easily consumed lots if time and money to put right but probably never really be right.

Part exchanged it on Friday for a newer, non shed XC70 though the irony is said sheddy V70 did the 410 miles without any drama and I got out wondering if it was a good move. But, it's done and I don't think I'd go back to a V70 in the future. Great cars but at an age where their age is showing and a tired one can be hard to run with shed ethos in mind.

Still have the V50 so still shedding with it... and I'd be loathed to give up on it, it's just been brilliant whereas the V70, wasn't.
Exactly why I gave up on XC70 shed. Cosmetics excellent, mechanicals a shagfest. So it's just the S60 that falls into the shed category, with the C70 just above shedhold, and the newer XC70 having even further to go.

The spinner of plates

14,517 posts

158 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
STIfree said:
largespiced said:
After posting in car buying I purchased a £900 Mini Cooper S for some shedding fun. Took it to brands couple of weeks back and was wonderful not having something worth a fortune to worry about. Its faultless, works everyday and is a great laugh. Even with 170k on the clock it feels very tight, and the supercharger whine is addictive!

Keep us updated on this one. I'm very tempted by a cheap Cooper S in a months time but almost everyone I've spoken to has advised me against it.

Anything special you did when buying one that helped you get a good one, or just luck of the draw?
I ran an R53 for a year or two, lovely little thing.

Put small wheels on - less outright grip but they handle lovely and the car moves around more progressively.

Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...

sebdangerfield

996 posts

129 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
Currently running a 1.9 tdi polo which I bought at 135,000 miles 5 years ago for £600. It’s now on 180,000 and it’s been slow to start for a few months, a few weeks ago wouldn’t crank at all and as lockdown meant one car is fine for us we just shared the non shed Discovery.

Cone today, I’ve decided to take a look at the starter to either replace or fix the wiring to it and I need to remove to air box and battery box to reach it. Unfortunately the battery box bolts are totally seized and rounded through rust. Being a very basic mechanically minded boy and not averse to a bodge, what’s the recommended course? Cut out the battery box plastic? Find a way to drill out the bolts? Find a scrappy to sell the piece of st to?

egor110

13,406 posts

161 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
The spinner of plates said:
STIfree said:
largespiced said:
After posting in car buying I purchased a £900 Mini Cooper S for some shedding fun. Took it to brands couple of weeks back and was wonderful not having something worth a fortune to worry about. Its faultless, works everyday and is a great laugh. Even with 170k on the clock it feels very tight, and the supercharger whine is addictive!

Keep us updated on this one. I'm very tempted by a cheap Cooper S in a months time but almost everyone I've spoken to has advised me against it.

Anything special you did when buying one that helped you get a good one, or just luck of the draw?
I ran an R53 for a year or two, lovely little thing.

Put small wheels on - less outright grip but they handle lovely and the car moves around more progressively.

Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...
Or instead of the lohen one there's one on ebay for about $18 , solid metal so won't snap.

M4cruiser

2,195 posts

108 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
The spinner of plates said:
Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...
Great idea for the dipstick. the Clio 3 (1.6) needs something similar.

bearman68

2,881 posts

90 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
The spinner of plates said:
I ran an R53 for a year or two, lovely little thing.

Put small wheels on - less outright grip but they handle lovely and the car moves around more progressively.

Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...
£70 bloody quid for a dipstick? That's not proper shedding

A500leroy

1,946 posts

76 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
sebdangerfield said:
Currently running a 1.9 tdi polo which I bought at 135,000 miles 5 years ago for £600. It’s now on 180,000 and it’s been slow to start for a few months, a few weeks ago wouldn’t crank at all and as lockdown meant one car is fine for us we just shared the non shed Discovery.

[b] Find a scrappy to sell the piece of st to?[b/]
Do this, plenty of other cars out there for £600 for another 5 yrs motoring.

The spinner of plates

14,517 posts

158 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
bearman68 said:
The spinner of plates said:
I ran an R53 for a year or two, lovely little thing.

Put small wheels on - less outright grip but they handle lovely and the car moves around more progressively.

Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...
£70 bloody quid for a dipstick? That's not proper shedding
Agreed. Seem to remember I paid less than £30 a few years ago.

egor110

13,406 posts

161 months

Sunday 12th July
quotequote all
The spinner of plates said:
bearman68 said:
The spinner of plates said:
I ran an R53 for a year or two, lovely little thing.

Put small wheels on - less outright grip but they handle lovely and the car moves around more progressively.

Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.

And on that point the dipstick has to do a weird 90 degree twist due to a rather torturous twisty tube route to the sump. They go brittle over time and the end can easily snap off... invest in one of these:
https://www.lohen.co.uk/cravenspeed-dipstick-gen-1...
£70 bloody quid for a dipstick? That's not proper shedding
Agreed. Seem to remember I paid less than £30 a few years ago.
I've just got a metal one off ebay for 18.99 , it's exactly the same as the one the r53 owers club shop sells ( when it's in stock)

Captain Answer

647 posts

145 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
sebdangerfield said:
Currently running a 1.9 tdi polo which I bought at 135,000 miles 5 years ago for £600. It’s now on 180,000 and it’s been slow to start for a few months, a few weeks ago wouldn’t crank at all and as lockdown meant one car is fine for us we just shared the non shed Discovery.

Cone today, I’ve decided to take a look at the starter to either replace or fix the wiring to it and I need to remove to air box and battery box to reach it. Unfortunately the battery box bolts are totally seized and rounded through rust. Being a very basic mechanically minded boy and not averse to a bodge, what’s the recommended course? Cut out the battery box plastic? Find a way to drill out the bolts? Find a scrappy to sell the piece of st to?
You checked its not the battery at fault? That'd be my first thing to do

If you cut out the box can you still secure the battery? That is obviously the easiest way but the battery has to be secured for the MOT

Captain Answer

647 posts

145 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
Cam belt done on the wife's Citroen shed, on starting I almost knew straight away it had been done recently and bodged. Most the engine mount bolts were chewed up, managed to get them out with too much fuss and the local fasteners luckily had replacements that would fit, found one of the bolts holding on the bottom end AUX belt pulley had been sheared and just left, managed to get that out with a left handed drill bit so didn't need the bolt extractor so got lucky there & had a bolt that would fit to replace, tensioner had ineed gone - cheap kit had been used and the retaining mech that goes over the lip on the block was bent. Water pump retaining bolt at top of the block side of the mount was a mess, half the threading was gone. managed to wind in some threaded bar then weld it in blind as no real access there then tidied off with small file and camera on phone, then just put the pump in over it, sprung washer & nut with a bit of thread locker on

All back on now and engine itself running nicely, but still crying about low oil pressure going into neutral at low speed, going to take a look at that one later. Heating also don't work, thinking either the heat exchanger is blocked or more likely it's the termostat & housing but not sure I fancy doing that job, looks a right pain

Decided It'll be in the scrap yard when she's had her time out of it, don't want to pass it off on anyone else - just see how long that actually ends up being

bearman68

2,881 posts

90 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
Captain Answer said:
Cam belt done on the wife's Citroen shed, on starting I almost knew straight away it had been done recently and bodged. Most the engine mount bolts were chewed up, managed to get them out with too much fuss and the local fasteners luckily had replacements that would fit, found one of the bolts holding on the bottom end AUX belt pulley had been sheared and just left, managed to get that out with a left handed drill bit so didn't need the bolt extractor so got lucky there & had a bolt that would fit to replace, tensioner had ineed gone - cheap kit had been used and the retaining mech that goes over the lip on the block was bent. Water pump retaining bolt at top of the block side of the mount was a mess, half the threading was gone. managed to wind in some threaded bar then weld it in blind as no real access there then tidied off with small file and camera on phone, then just put the pump in over it, sprung washer & nut with a bit of thread locker on

All back on now and engine itself running nicely, but still crying about low oil pressure going into neutral at low speed, going to take a look at that one later. Heating also don't work, thinking either the heat exchanger is blocked or more likely it's the termostat & housing but not sure I fancy doing that job, looks a right pain

Decided It'll be in the scrap yard when she's had her time out of it, don't want to pass it off on anyone else - just see how long that actually ends up being
Since you've had the water pump off, it's most likely to be air in the system. There are normally a tyre cap bleed valve for the coolant system. Unscrew it, and a whole pile of air will come out, and away the heaters will go. (Usually).

Bullet-Proof_Biscuit

735 posts

35 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
The spinner of plates said:
Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.
So I've realised I need a sub £1k shed and blown mini S sounds like just the ticket. I've done due diligence of 2 hours of reading into their issues, and your/their oil loss is most likely sump gasket, front crank seal, crank sensor gasket or rocket gasket, in that order of difficulty. Rather than actual engine consumption of it. Gaskets cheap, fair bit of spannering required though. Solid bargaining point mind.
Beers.

Captain Answer

647 posts

145 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
bearman68 said:
Since you've had the water pump off, it's most likely to be air in the system. There are normally a tyre cap bleed valve for the coolant system. Unscrew it, and a whole pile of air will come out, and away the heaters will go. (Usually).
Already bled at both points in the system unfortunately... Not worrying about it too much right now. Oil pressure warning is now sorted though!


Edited by Captain Answer on Monday 13th July 21:25

egor110

13,406 posts

161 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
Bullet-Proof_Biscuit said:
The spinner of plates said:
Watch the oil level as this engine really doesn’t tolerate being run low. Reading the forums, the usage variance was huge between ‘doesn’t burn a drop’ to ‘it’s burned 1ltr per 1,000 miles from new’. Mine was nearer the latter which became tiresome after a while.
So I've realised I need a sub £1k shed and blown mini S sounds like just the ticket. I've done due diligence of 2 hours of reading into their issues, and your/their oil loss is most likely sump gasket, front crank seal, crank sensor gasket or rocket gasket, in that order of difficulty. Rather than actual engine consumption of it. Gaskets cheap, fair bit of spannering required though. Solid bargaining point mind.
Beers.
Worth bearing in mind the oil leak could be bad news but on the other hand go on the r53 owners facebook group and even they joke about minis leaking oil.

grumpy52

4,470 posts

124 months

Monday 13th July
quotequote all
New shed incoming tomorrow
It popped up on the local FB market place and I managed to get in first .
Viewed it today done the deal and pick it up tomorrow.
It's a 2.5L petrol SVE Auto ,with leather and all the toys work , decent quality tyres, new brakes and tested till March and never had a tow bar . The seller had under valued it by about £500 ,her phone was going mad while I was viewing the car so wouldn't budge on the asking price
Less than a bag of sand .
My Focus has eaten another coil pack and the clutch has started to smell on long hills , my mate with a salvage business is having it as a runner until the clutch fails .

STIfree

1,771 posts

117 months

Tuesday 14th July
quotequote all
If anyone else wants to get into LS430 ownership for £1k this has just popped up for sale in Tonbridge

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/74649107...

Looks ropey around the edges but then so did mine in the advert. Lambda sensor could be the same reason as mine, blow on the flange for the cats.

I love the wafty nature of mine and they seem to be pretty solid cars.


TeamBigfoot

117 posts

31 months

Tuesday 14th July
quotequote all
Gents and ladies,

After some man logic i've now joined the Shed revolution smile

  • The logic*
During a large garden overhaul I needed an extra large skip for which i was quoted £290. I hatched a plan to buy a shed big enough for many tip runs instead of the skip (the family cars are too nice to destroy), to be bought as close to £300 as possible and at the end of the tip runs i've technically got a free car!

The search was started last week on facebook marketplace and gumtree.

Last night i picked up this renault scenic 1.6vvt with a recent new clutch and MOT extended with COVID, for £325. Its a little rough around the edges but drives fine having had a new battery, front pads and front springs within the last 6 months. The e-handbrake also works perfectly (a common failure).

Please find the pic below if it works!



ajprice

18,849 posts

154 months

Tuesday 14th July
quotequote all
£35 for a Scenic, top man maths biggrin