Birmingham Crash

Author
Discussion

M4CK 1

266 posts

66 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
u04pww2 said:
2 Children dead, Audi S3 drove away from the scene and driver of Bentley continental arrested for dangerous driving.

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/black-country/liv...
Very sad situation. I see so many cars with children not strapped in. Parents need to wake up!!!! My kids used to grumble occasionally about seat belts, just ignore the moans. Not saying this is the case with this incident.
The S3 driver must of run for it as the Audi is in the video clip.

Russian Troll Bot

19,932 posts

166 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Dapster said:
BBC Website said:
The crash happened on a road covered by an injunction forbidding people from so-called car cruising.

Prohibited activities include speeding, driving in convoy, racing and performing stunts between the hours of 15:00 and 07:00.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-47582763

What??? Why would an injunction prevent doing things that are against the law in the first place? Presumably you can't speed, race or do stunts at any time?
The only effective deterrent to such driving is a patrol car, but the likelihood of that is very low.

Kewy

852 posts

33 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
The frustrating thing is, the general public's response to these types of incidents is – 'we must reduce the speed limits, we must turn the cameras back on'. People who drive like this are going to do it regardless of whether the limit is a 50 or a 30 down there.


Genuine Barn Find

4,992 posts

154 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Kewy said:
The frustrating thing is, the general public's response to these types of incidents is – 'we must reduce the speed limits, we must turn the cameras back on'. People who drive like this are going to do it regardless of whether the limit is a 50 or a 30 down there.
Quite. The Black Country has a 'no cruising' policy and signs everywhere to that effect. Simply put, dheads in fast cars are always going to drive like dheads when the opportunity arises - I live in Halesowen and you can hear them racing down the bypass towards Hagley on a Friday and Saturday night. The only way to stop this is to increase the amount of patrol cars (but the opposite is happening there, so that's a non-starter).

I'd suggest a much stricter way of dealing with the vermin who cause accidents like this. When he is caught, in legal terms it will no doubt be a short prison sentence and a long ban (hardly reflective of the carnage and abject grief he has caused). Simply put, if you use your car as a weapon in this manner and cause the death of someone you should be up for a murder charge (and if found guilty sentenced accordingly) and banned for life.







st4

1,359 posts

72 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Genuine Barn Find said:
Quite. The Black Country has a 'no cruising' policy and signs everywhere to that effect. Simply put, dheads in fast cars are always going to drive like dheads when the opportunity arises - I live in Halesowen and you can hear them racing down the bypass towards Hagley on a Friday and Saturday night. The only way to stop this is to increase the amount of patrol cars (but the opposite is happening there, so that's a non-starter).

I'd suggest a much stricter way of dealing with the vermin who cause accidents like this. When he is caught, in legal terms it will no doubt be a short prison sentence and a long ban (hardly reflective of the carnage and abject grief he has caused). Simply put, if you use your car as a weapon in this manner and cause the death of someone you should be up for a murder charge (and if found guilty sentenced accordingly) and banned for life.
I’m not quite so sure. This is unintended - plunging a knife into someone isn’t. Common sense is on they were driving in an aggressive and illegal way but didn’t plan on that happening. I wouldn’t place this on the same criminality/morally reprehensible scale as these knife attackers that plague our cities.

Say there was no impact, no death, just the bad wreckless driving would you advocate a life sentence and life time ban? If not, why not - the basic actions are the same.

Given a nonce gets a short stretch these days those who maim unintentionally behind the wheel get a tougher deal imho.

Given one of the drivers fled the scene (and assuming the car wasn’t stolen they’ll be easily tracked down) and the punishment will be severe.


Edited by st4 on Friday 15th March 14:21

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Russian Troll Bot

19,932 posts

166 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
I wonder if the Bentley will transpire to be a hire car from a company owned by his uncle's cousin's mate's brother?

Genuine Barn Find

4,992 posts

154 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
st4 said:
I’m not quite so sure. This is unintended - plunging a knife into someone isn’t. Common sense is on they were driving in an aggressive and illegal way but didn’t plan on that happening. I wouldn’t place this on the same criminality/morally reprehensible scale as these knife attackers that plague our cities.

Say there was no impact, no death, just the bad wreckless driving would you advocate a life sentence and life time ban? If not, why not - the basic actions are the same.

Given a nonce gets a short stretch these days those who maim unintentionally behind the wheel get a tougher deal imho.

Given one of the drivers fled the scene (and assuming the car wasn’t stolen they’ll be easily tracked down) and the punishment will be severe.

All fair points. If there was no impact or death (just bad driving) then of course I would not advocate a life sentence.

I am sure the driver didn't set out with the intention of killing two children (in the same way that someone carrying a knife probably doesn't set out with the intention of sticking it into another persons' gut). However, as a direct result of his actions he has killed two people (and likely destroyed an entire family). Not only that, as opposed to facing up to what he has done, he has done a runner.


Edited by st4 on Friday 15th March 14:21

Ninja59

2,049 posts

51 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Russian Troll Bot said:
I wonder if the Bentley will transpire to be a hire car from a company owned by his uncle's cousin's mate's brother?
I could mention a certain company, and a "lord", but it appears they don't have such a car on their list (at least online).

It is sickening this as an accident, probably most of all for the mother sadly who (at least one face value) will have lost 2 children due to this stupidity.

dudleybloke

14,688 posts

125 months

Friday 15th March
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You often get idiots racing up and down that stretch of road when it's dark.
R.I.P.

SydneyBridge

4,174 posts

97 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
I assume the Police know who the owner of the Audi is, at it was left at the scene.

Plunging a knife into someone is premeditated, with intent to kill/seriously injure, but racing at excessive speeds, it could be argued, has just as much intent. if you are racing at hugely excessive speed and hit something/someone, it is not going to end well. a recklessly driven car is a potentially lethal weapon

Kewy

852 posts

33 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
st4 said:
I’m not quite so sure. This is unintended - plunging a knife into someone isn’t. Common sense is on they were driving in an aggressive and illegal way but didn’t plan on that happening. I wouldn’t place this on the same criminality/morally reprehensible scale as these knife attackers that plague our cities.

Say there was no impact, no death, just the bad wreckless driving would you advocate a life sentence and life time ban? If not, why not - the basic actions are the same.

Given a nonce gets a short stretch these days those who maim unintentionally behind the wheel get a tougher deal imho.

Given one of the drivers fled the scene (and assuming the car wasn’t stolen they’ll be easily tracked down) and the punishment will be severe.


Edited by st4 on Friday 15th March 14:21
I wonder what the charge would be for walking into a crowded shopping centre and jabbing a knife around repeatedly with a blind fold on.

Good chance you won't hit someone, but if you do then injury/death is inevitable.

One could argue that street racing in built up areas is the same hehe

monthefish

19,303 posts

170 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Krikkit said:
Perhaps the kids weren't wearing seatbelts? I concurr that it doesn't look that damaged.
Are talking about the same car?




Looks like massive side impact judging by the severe deformation of the sills.

KPB1973

183 posts

38 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Devastating for the family - but also horrendous for the emergency services involved too.

Irrespective of training and experience, I think it would take me a very, very, very long time to come to terms with seeing what was inside that car.


SydneyBridge

4,174 posts

97 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
that damage to the BMW certainly matches the frontal damage to the Audi

st4

1,359 posts

72 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
SydneyBridge said:
Plunging a knife into someone is premeditated, with intent to kill/seriously injure, but racing at excessive speeds, it could be argued, has just as much intent. if you are racing at hugely excessive speed and hit something/someone, it is not going to end well. a recklessly driven car is a potentially lethal weapon
I don't agree. For a start your scenario is almost certain to result in death - and it's a malicious action.

How many speeding/wreckless events end like this - relatively very very few. Hence the punishment that will come will not match that of a knife attacker.

scenario8

5,207 posts

118 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
monthefish said:
Are talking about the same car?




Looks like massive side impact judging by the severe deformation of the sills.
The impact that made that mess carried “a lot” of energy. I wouldn’t want to find myself sat anywhere inside any car in a similar event.

Tragic.

kev1974

2,737 posts

68 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
SydneyBridge said:
I assume the Police know who the owner of the Audi is, at it was left at the scene.
"Oh isn't my car where I left it officer? It must have been stolen."

jonvw84

142 posts

20 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
A VW friends flat overlooks this junction and I live 3 miles down the road (but still the same road A4123) and his balcony overlooks where it happened, he's just about holding up as they went through just after and saw the children being worked on...

People are forever green light racing on that stretch and up and down the stretch that goes from the Tesco to the turning for the Black Country Museum (can hear them every night)

Sadly it was only a matter of time before this happened, the crusing ban is a complete joke and has only served to create this type of thing, I'm surprised that nothing like Hams Hall back in the day as resurfaced (though I hear the Hagley Mile is a strong contender for douchebaggery based driving)

Thoughts go out to the family and I hope the low life scum driving the Audi has the balls to hand himself in

rambo19

2,148 posts

76 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
Russian Troll Bot said:
I wonder if the Bentley will transpire to be a hire car from a company owned by his uncle's cousin's mate's brother?
Going out on a limb here, i'm going to say innit bruvs in hire cars............................

Hazuki

282 posts

77 months

Friday 15th March
quotequote all
A friend lives on a side road of this dual carriageway and heard the bang. General consensus is that the Bentley and Audi S3 were racing each other. Her and a lot of the locals rushed out to try and help and she told me she'll never forget the harrowing screams of the mother in the BMW. Police officers who arrived on scene were also visibly shaken.

RIP to the two little boys (ages 10 and 2) who died because of some utter cocks racing on the dual carrageway. The Audi driver who ploughed in to the car didn't even have the decency to hang around and abandoned the car. Hope both are prosecuted to the full extent of the law.