RE: Peugeot 308 GT THP | Shed of the Week

RE: Peugeot 308 GT THP | Shed of the Week

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Discussion

Halmyre

7,837 posts

89 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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1974foggy said:
Halmyre said:
Has Mrs Shed lost her allure?
Ha - Allure - isnt that a Peugeot trim level name? See what you did there.
I had no idea. I suspect that if Mrs Shed can be compared to any trim level, it would be the original Range Rover that you can hose down after the event.

MadDog1962

779 posts

112 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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It looks almost as awful as a Megane, and it'll probably cost as much to repair when it goes wrong.

No thanks. Even for shed money. vomit

Arsecati

472 posts

67 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Biggest thing that amuses me after scanning through all these posts, is the two posters who BOTH state they had THREE French cars, and they were 'terrible', 'never again' and 'lesson learned'.

Hmmm, your first French car was such an absolute piece of s**t that you decided to take the plunge......... two more times??? laughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaugh

jameswsb

22 posts

70 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Arsecati said:
Biggest thing that amuses me after scanning through all these posts, is the two posters who BOTH state they had THREE French cars, and they were 'terrible', 'never again' and 'lesson learned'.

Hmmm, your first French car was such an absolute piece of s**t that you decided to take the plunge......... two more times??? laughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaugh
Haha quite! I've had three Renaults (two Renaultsports) in a mix of Ford's, BMW's, Alpina's etc and they have been the three most dependable cars I've ever owned.

sgtBerbatov

1,818 posts

31 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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MrGeoff said:
sgtBerbatov said:
The electronic power steering pumps in these are a death trap. When I had my Peugeot 3008 (which is essentially a parts bin build of this) I was doing 50 mph when the power steering encountered a failure. When this happened it turned off the pump, meaning I had no power steering. At 50mph. I'm a big guy, I'm not weak, and I struggled to turn the wheel. I got it to the side of the road and turned it off and on again and it resolved the issue. Until I got home and it failed again when turning on to the drive.

The cause? One mechanic said the ECU had died and it needed to be refurbed at the cost of £300. A new pump from Peugeot cost £800. But apparently, from reading a few things online, this can happen if one tyre has more or less pressure than the other, causing the pump to panic and turn off. How is that even remotely safe?

So, like most Peugeots of this era, unless you hate money you're best to avoid such a hateful thing.
That sounds just a little bit worrying. Begs the question how safe are steering systems these days?
If it fails and takes the system with it, then it's an accident waiting to happen. The car was about 1,500kg, and the best way I could describe it was having a hand on either side of a full wardrobe and trying to turn it on it's side. If it failed but kept the system pressured or at least working to a point then it wouldn't be so bad. But if they fail off like that then it's horrific.

CedricN

496 posts

95 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Number of claims per car per year, according to one Swedish insurance company. This is from 2017.

If you read it in detail on Peugeot specific most of their claims are around the bmw 1.6 THP engine, which has so many issues. Apart from that they are pretty good.

Why bother with facts anyway...


humphra

107 posts

42 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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CedricN said:
Number of claims per car per year, according to one Swedish insurance company. This is from 2017.

If you read it in detail on Peugeot specific most of their claims are around the bmw 1.6 THP engine, which has so many issues. Apart from that they are pretty good.

Why bother with facts anyway...

Heretic!! How will the doom mongers and naysayers be heard when you hurl insignificant things such facts into the mix?? wink

DoctorX

4,716 posts

117 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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The door mirrors on these always look saggy to me and, for that reason, Ah’m oot.

miken2k8

127 posts

33 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Zetec-S said:
Coincidentally I was following a 308 on my commute this morning. Brake lights were stuck on the entire journey.

So it's a no from me... coffee
That's just peugoet drivers. You know the type that brake all the way down a hill instead of changing down, break for corners with no need. Or when a car passes on other side of rode.

Bercilac

136 posts

19 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Out of the 69 cars I have owned over the last 42 years and 1.5 million miles, all 30 of the French ones have been reliable. All were second hand, most diesel and the biggest mileage was a Citroen C5 at 250k on original engine, box, clutch, alternator and exhaust.

The only French car that ever let me down was a Xantia. The clutch cable snapped at 178,000 miles - £25 fixed it.

The problem with French cars is the owners who couldn't give a stuff about proper servicing. If you service them right they are fine.

I never bought one under four years of age or spent more than £3250 on a daily drone and I've sold several for more than I paid after a few years of use. I still have two Pugs in my family fleet - a 407 coupe and a 206 1.4 16v Sport (now that's a cracking little shed motor).

One has been a daily for the last six years and the other my eldest sons learner hack and run about for the last three years.

I tell you what though, keep hating fellas, I'm loving the cheap prices.

miken2k8

127 posts

33 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Crumpet said:
I’ve had three French cars - Laguna, Clio and a 307. Every single one of them left me stranded, multiple times in the case of the 307 and the Clio. They’re st.

On the other hand, none of the seven British cars I’ve had have left me stranded anywhere. Plenty of issues with them, but I’ll take a whiny differential or leaky air conditioning over self-combustion.

Shedding in a French car is very brave!
i did 10000 miles in 3 months in an 05 laguna earlier this year with no oil checks or anything. Admittedly it had been looked after but you'll often find the unreliability comes down to a lack of proper maintenence. This fuels the steep depreciation of french cars and gives them a throwaway reputation at 10 years, bit like vauxhalls. Shame really. Even the saxo 1.1 i had 10 years ago hit the limiter without oil change for 20000 miles and the xsara i had last year did 12000 miles without any checks. S reg 200 quid. I just don't believe what i'm reading in this thread.

geo1905

28 posts

14 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Just watch that oil level ! The later N18 engine ain't perfect but the earlier N14 version could use oil like it was going out of fashion !

Liamjrhodes

153 posts

91 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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DoctorX said:
The door mirrors on these always look saggy to me and, for that reason, Ah’m oot.
Oh wow, i never realised. But now you have mentioned it. Very odd!

A Winner Is You

21,201 posts

177 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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The front end of these was truly gopping, the worst of their basking shark with a gumshield school of design

stickleback123

5,434 posts

139 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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I've run a few old French snotters and they've not been any more or less reliable than any of the other snotters I've had, however when they do need work I've found that the job is often significantly harder and more time consuming (thus costly if you're paying) than repairs on most other cars.

It's a rare week that I don't see one or two French cars with an indicator coming on for a brake light, or some other evidence of a wiring fault though! I can't remember the last time I saw anything except a Peugeot, Renault, or Citroen doing that.

Peldrigal

18 posts

8 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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Turbobanana said:
Off topic a bit, but it's interesting to look on US sites like Jalopnik, for their take on what they perceive as a "reliable" car. Generally speaking the all-hailed (in the UK) German stuff gets a beating. Granted they don't get a lot of European stuff like Peugeots and Renaults, but it's Japanese all day long there.
Americans have a completely different engineering stereotype: for them "German" does not mean "reliable" but "overengineered", as in "needlessly complicated". They might admire it, but not trust it.

sling

2 posts

93 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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The wife's got the GTI version of this. Bought it 6 years ago with 15K km on the clock, and it's now just past 80K. Other than a new battery, new front pads and headlamp bulbs (twice), it's been completely trouble-free. No advisories whatsoever. Yes, it does use some oil, but not excessively so. The engine and the gearbox are excellent, it really likes to rev. Seats are super comfy, if a bit high. Build quality is pretty good, if not quite on par with the more boring German alternatives. It's definitely a keeper, and certainly not just because used values are low for these.

Loplop

1,720 posts

135 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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CedricN said:
Number of claims per car per year, according to one Swedish insurance company. This is from 2017.

If you read it in detail on Peugeot specific most of their claims are around the bmw 1.6 THP engine, which has so many issues. Apart from that they are pretty good.

Why bother with facts anyway...

Funny that you call it the 'BMW' THP engine when the general gist is that the Prince was a development of the TU by PSA and BMW merely lent it's Valvetronic tech to PSA so that they could secure the engine for the MINI.

Maybe I don't know enough about it?

Quick question about the graph, I feel like it needs some context. How many cars of each manufacturer are sold and on the road in Sweden? Surely it would be more prudent to compare the amount of claims against vehicles sold to work out some sort of percentage?

And no, I don't hate French cars, I like them quite a lot. I'm actively scouring for a nice GTi6 306 or a Saxo VTS as a track car. I desperately want to own an RS 172/182 Clio and I'm pleading with my father to find a nice Safrane once he's moved to France. That doesn't mean they're free from (valid) criticism.

The two BMWs I own have been subject to full cooling system replacements, I've been left stranded twice by my 540i because the gearbox spat it's dummy out and my 530 has bizarre electrical issues that mean I have to unlock the front doors on the key (shock horror, how common) despite the rest working great off of the remote.

BFleming

1,765 posts

93 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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geo1905 said:
Just watch that oil level ! The later N18 engine ain't perfect but the earlier N14 version could use oil like it was going out of fashion !
Throw the N13 in there too. They suffer premature timing chain wear, the oil consumption is a symptom of the chain wear. Not a bad engine when it's without fault. It's just the faults are plentiful (timing chain, coolant leaks and oil leaks being most prevalent).

Howard-

4,044 posts

152 months

Friday 25th October 2019
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miken2k8 said:
Well it's a load of rubbish, it's not an older french car. After 2005 or so french cars are just as reliable as anything else. Thanks to these opinions the rest of us can pick up a bargain.
This is just not true I'm afraid. I'd argue that 2005> French cars are worse than the older ones, if anything. They are flimsy and unreliable, and cheap for a reason. They're all yours hehe