RE: (Nearly) 25 years of the Audi TT | PH Video

RE: (Nearly) 25 years of the Audi TT | PH Video

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bangerhoarder

67 posts

22 months

Monday 16th March
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I love my Mk1 225. I'm on my second, as the first was a poorly maintained Friday car and was desperately unreliable - cost me a fortune. I bought the second while I still had the first (for a fraction of the cost) and went through its issues fixing it up. Now that the suspension has been refreshed, it's a lovely thing.

WRT the whole 'it's just FWD' thing, it really doesn't feel that way pressing on (comparing it to Fabia VRS mk1 really shows that!) It's very neutral, and the back comes around with the front. You can feel the power distributing back, and the grip is pretty fantastic. It's more of a GT than sports car really as it's heavy, but it's very capable. On a track, the ESP would interfere too much, but I'm sure it can be disabled beyond just the dashboard button if needed.

paultownsend

736 posts

137 months

Monday 16th March
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flukey5 said:
Never saw the point of paying extra for haldex based 4WD systems. Basically it's FWD unless you lose traction, in which case it spins the back wheels a bit to help out. In my opinion, save money and weight and get the FWD, you're going to be getting the FWD experience 95% of the time anyways wink
Nope. Have you driven one? I had a 8P S3, so the same drivetrain a the mk2 TT. 260hp/260lbft. It would put the power down with the esp off whatever the weather. Different generations of Haldex work differently. But the new generations I understand always but some torque to the rear.

flukey5

91 posts

14 months

Monday 16th March
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paultownsend said:
flukey5 said:
Never saw the point of paying extra for haldex based 4WD systems. Basically it's FWD unless you lose traction, in which case it spins the back wheels a bit to help out. In my opinion, save money and weight and get the FWD, you're going to be getting the FWD experience 95% of the time anyways wink
Nope. Have you driven one? I had a 8P S3, so the same drivetrain a the mk2 TT. 260hp/260lbft. It would put the power down with the esp off whatever the weather. Different generations of Haldex work differently. But the new generations I understand always but some torque to the rear.
I drove back to back my Mk3 non-quattro manual and an equivalent HP quattro auto. Honestly I noticed very little in the way of difference, though this was in the dry. With the FWD I find you can get a bit of lift off oversteer and sometimes the ESP will kick in in the wet - though I haven't pushed a quattro enough to find out the real difference.

My point is, day to day driving I doubt most would notice much of a difference.

cerb4.5lee

14,778 posts

134 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
paultownsend said:
flukey5 said:
Never saw the point of paying extra for haldex based 4WD systems. Basically it's FWD unless you lose traction, in which case it spins the back wheels a bit to help out. In my opinion, save money and weight and get the FWD, you're going to be getting the FWD experience 95% of the time anyways wink
Nope. Have you driven one? I had a 8P S3, so the same drivetrain a the mk2 TT. 260hp/260lbft. It would put the power down with the esp off whatever the weather. Different generations of Haldex work differently. But the new generations I understand always but some torque to the rear.
I drove back to back my Mk3 non-quattro manual and an equivalent HP quattro auto. Honestly I noticed very little in the way of difference, though this was in the dry. With the FWD I find you can get a bit of lift off oversteer and sometimes the ESP will kick in in the wet - though I haven't pushed a quattro enough to find out the real difference.

My point is, day to day driving I doubt most would notice much of a difference.
I've often read in reviews that the FWD version is the pick of the Audi TT range. I often thought that the mk2 TTS I had would've driven better being FWD only. The Haldex 4WD system on that could feel quite at odds at times, great for traction in the wet but quite unpredictable in the corners in the dry for me.

I much preferred the rear drive bias of the other 4WD systems I've had(Sierra XR4X4/BMW X-drive).

HighwayStar

2,749 posts

98 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
paultownsend said:
flukey5 said:
Never saw the point of paying extra for haldex based 4WD systems. Basically it's FWD unless you lose traction, in which case it spins the back wheels a bit to help out. In my opinion, save money and weight and get the FWD, you're going to be getting the FWD experience 95% of the time anyways wink
Nope. Have you driven one? I had a 8P S3, so the same drivetrain a the mk2 TT. 260hp/260lbft. It would put the power down with the esp off whatever the weather. Different generations of Haldex work differently. But the new generations I understand always but some torque to the rear.
I drove back to back my Mk3 non-quattro manual and an equivalent HP quattro auto. Honestly I noticed very little in the way of difference, though this was in the dry. With the FWD I find you can get a bit of lift off oversteer and sometimes the ESP will kick in in the wet - though I haven't pushed a quattro enough to find out the real difference.

My point is, day to day driving I doubt most would notice much of a difference.
I’d agree the average buyer of a TT wouldn’t tell the difference. In the MK3 it’s a lovely place to be and it’s attractive enough, it’s what most like. The presentation. A friend has one... fully loaded. Never uses the paddles. She’ll give it a little on the twisties but not really putting her foot in.
Someone who is going to push it though, they will notice the difference.
My neighbours were surprised when I moved my TTS on... it was a good car but I just never really enjoy it but they were oh it’s such a nice car, it’s an Audi, it looks lovely. Ignoring your more enthusiastic RS customer, that’s your basic Audi customer right there.

Ecosseven

1,479 posts

171 months

Monday 16th March
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Always liked the TT and have driven a mk1. the model that really appeals is the TTS with manual transmission. It's never going to be Porsche Boxster / Cayman beater but as a daily driver with a bit of style, great performance, and reasonable running costs I think it has a lot to commend it. Just my opinion of course.

Sadly Audi have discontinued the TTS with a manual 'box and it's now either FWD manual or Quattro with S-Tronic. Shame.

flukey5

91 posts

14 months

Monday 16th March
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Ecosseven said:
Always liked the TT and have driven a mk1. the model that really appeals is the TTS with manual transmission. It's never going to be Porsche Boxster / Cayman beater but as a daily driver with a bit of style, great performance, and reasonable running costs I think it has a lot to commend it. Just my opinion of course.

Sadly Audi have discontinued the TTS with a manual 'box and it's now either FWD manual or Quattro with S-Tronic. Shame.
This really, would be nice to see an 'enthusiast' TTS/TTRS with a manual and the same rear-biased 4WD system used in the R8. Sadly, it won't happen and my next car won't be another TT frown (but i'm sure the interior is unbeatable)

W12AAM

42 posts

35 months

Monday 16th March
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I never really rated them much...However; 5 years ago i met my present partner who had a 2008 Mk2 TT covertible (2.0 manual).
Shes also a hairdresser - Hence "that image" it always gave out and thats probably why i never took them too seriously.

She still has the car and its coming upto 140,000 miles & i use it most days for my 30 mile commute.

And it is a fantastic car!

With the turbo and the 2.0 engine, it just "pulls" - even at 80+.
The grip is really good; An excellent sized boot and i really like it.

I would say they are probably cheaper to run than a Boxter and this one has had no problems since she owned it with 107k on the clock.
the only problem is the topping up of oil due to the problematic TSFI engine - But i probably do that only every 6 months or so.
And its width is sometimes problematic in tight car spaces..

2Btoo

1,782 posts

157 months

Monday 16th March
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I happen to think that the best thing ever written about the TT was in this article on PH a couple of years ago, comparing the Mk3 TTRS with the Cayman and Exige:

https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

article said:
In the context of the other two, the TT doesn't feel like the more humble cars it shares architecture with; it feels like an SUV. And not a very good one. While the Audi is here as the everyday prospect, it still has to succeed as a sports car, and there's no question it feels leaden and obstinate compared to its rivals. And not all that confidence inspiring, despite the drivetrain. The TT steers quickly yet vaguely, seemingly desperate to give you a sense of sports car urgency without the substance to back it up. The ride manages to be both irritable and imprecise, apparently too stiff in compression and then too slow to rebound. The brakes are grabby. On more than one occasion, the front wheels spin noticeably before there's any sense of power going rearwards. Which isn't all that pleasant.
(An aside but I watched the first 5 seconds of that video and started to feel seasick. Did someone leave their tripod at home?)

HighwayStar

2,749 posts

98 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
Ecosseven said:
Always liked the TT and have driven a mk1. the model that really appeals is the TTS with manual transmission. It's never going to be Porsche Boxster / Cayman beater but as a daily driver with a bit of style, great performance, and reasonable running costs I think it has a lot to commend it. Just my opinion of course.

Sadly Audi have discontinued the TTS with a manual 'box and it's now either FWD manual or Quattro with S-Tronic. Shame.
I had a MK1 225 after a GTi 6. The pug was head and shoulders above it in the handling stakes. The 225 was a great car and really got under my skin. Got up one morning, the front door was open and it was gone.
A TTS, manual, replaced it. I could never love it. I wanted a Cayman but at the time the TTS suited my pocket. It’s a great package in terms of all all rounder, it offers a lot.
I can see why they are loved and hated in equal measure though.
It did finally make way for a Cayman. Totally works for me as a package, it’s not a daily but enough space for me, my girlie and weekends away.

Wild Card 911

78 posts

100 months

Monday 16th March
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The MK I´s 25 year old design hasn´t lost any of its charm. In fact in times when designers don´t know when to stop, it stands out through being simple, clean and honest.

Bauhaus among the pop-art and punk.

In QS form its simplicity suits the driving experience.The understated character echoes its role model, Porsche´s 964 RS. The limited numbers (half as many as the Porsche) make it a good investment and a smart intro at a car event. Tasteful modification is not expensive, and refining the chassis is rewarding.

We are reaching the point where the roads (and car events) are so overcrowded with loud and brash, winged a flashy, that it is refreshing to experience to drive such a car.

Don´t underestimate the 2005 TT Quattro Sport.

komakino

12 posts

54 months

Monday 16th March
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I picked up my new TTS last week and absolutely loving it. For me, it's the honey of the range. It hasn't got the garish styling of the RS and the awful fixed wing, yet hasn't got the slightly tiresome ride of the Cayman S, which is still a brilliant car.

There's not many TT's around, so still a relatively rare sight - at least where I live!

smaybury

82 posts

103 months

Monday 16th March
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I always enjoyed my MKI 225. The cabin always felt like a special place to be, and a few choice, inexpensive mods transformed the sound it made and the handling.

I do get that you can say that about any mediocre car - 'if you just change this, then...' - but stiffer ARBs, a forge recirculating valve, some silicon pipes and a modified airbox all went a long way to vastly enhancing the sound and feel for less than £500. I never got round to getting it mapped, either.

Oh, and if anyone's wondering, it's possible to comfortably fit an adult Rhodesian Ridgeback across the back seat and a 42" telly in the boot.

RaineyDays

80 posts

54 months

Monday 16th March
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I’ve had 3 of them and they are great for cruising up and down the motorway. My mk3 TTS is lovely inside and has plenty of pace when it’s needed.

This TTS will be my last one though, I don’t find myself going out for a weekend drive like I used to in my Z4M.

M2, Cayman or Boxster next.

cerb4.5lee

14,778 posts

134 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
RaineyDays said:
This TTS will be my last one though, I don’t find myself going out for a weekend drive like I used to in my Z4M.
I've had both as well and the TTS(I had a mk2) is certainly more of a daily I reckon...whereas I had the Z4M as a weekend car. I do love the way the mk3 TTS looks big time though.

HighwayStar

2,749 posts

98 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
komakino said:
I picked up my new TTS last week and absolutely loving it. For me, it's the honey of the range. It hasn't got the garish styling of the RS and the awful fixed wing, yet hasn't got the slightly tiresome ride of the Cayman S, which is still a brilliant car.

There's not many TT's around, so still a relatively rare sight - at least where I live!
That’s interesting re the ride. I can’t speak re the MK3 but the MK2 TTS was ok ride wise until I hit the sport button. It firm up the steering, more sensitive throttle but the ride when to ste... no finesse, just firm and joggling all over the place. My 981 Cayman on 20’s and PASM on or off is just wonderful.
From what you’re saying it sounds like Audi have sorted the ride.

VeeFource

1,000 posts

131 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
Is the TT any worse to drive than a Golf GTI or R (depending on the drivetrain)? I'd find it hard to believe it is with the wider track & lower centre of gravity but the Golfs are widely praised for how they drive.

Also has anyone with VCDS changed the 'straight line running' setting in the steering? Disabling this has brought about a significantly more interactive steering character on other Audi products and could help the car feel a lot less inert.

wjb

4,947 posts

85 months

Monday 16th March
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Love a TT, I don't get any "girls car" comments, it's probably something more commonly said from the safety of the internet hehe

I've had two, a original mk1 and I'm now in a Mk2 TFSI.


HighwayStar

2,749 posts

98 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
VeeFource said:
Is the TT any worse to drive than a Golf GTI or R (depending on the drivetrain)? I'd find it hard to believe it is with the wider track & lower centre of gravity but the Golfs are widely praised for how they drive.

Also has anyone with VCDS changed the 'straight line running' setting in the steering? Disabling this has brought about a significantly more interactive steering character on other Audi products and could help the car feel a lot less inert.
CofG won’t play much part between the TT and the Golf... it was the engine hanging out front ahead of the axel line. It was moved back in the MK3 and with the 5cyl, that engined was lighter compared to the previous model. It’s a shame, it could be a much better car.

J4CKO

30,249 posts

154 months

Monday 16th March
quotequote all
I miss mine (225), even though it was a pain in the arse, I liked it, it just felt right.

I love the MK1, MK2 isnt a bad car but the Mk3 got the looks almost back on track from the landmark original.

Strangely, for me anyway, it mirrors how I view the three models of Ford Capri.