Coronavirus = empty roads

Coronavirus = empty roads

Author
Discussion

braddo

6,992 posts

143 months

Thursday 26th March
quotequote all
smartypants said:
... it’s not about the numbers that die, it’s the amount of people being ill at the same time.

We’d benefit hugely from a population cull of 60 and above...
What absolutely batst stupid, psycho things to say.

Your first point is factually wrong. No-one is worried about the NHS being 'overrun' with people with mild symptoms. The whole point of the NHS being overrun is that it will lead to massively higher deaths (not just direct coronavirus deaths).

Your second point makes you sound like some sort of Nazi eugenics psycho.


Boosted LS1

19,049 posts

215 months

Thursday 26th March
quotequote all
Doofus said:
Boosted LS1 said:
'm allowed to go out. Don't you get it? If you don't grasp the basics then I'd suggest you keep your family in and clean up the dogst in the kitchen. Your family are a greater risk then me. You don't need to take the dogs out but assessed the risk just like I've done. You could kennel them and remain indoors.





Edited by Boosted LS1 on Thursday 26th March 22:20
Why is my family a greater risk than you?

Why am I arguing with a tt?
Because it's getting late :-) you're a tt with a wife, that takes the dogs out when they could stay indoors and be kennelled. I'm single, no family to spread germs everywhere. You're twice the risk and some.

smartypants

44,679 posts

124 months

Thursday 26th March
quotequote all
braddo said:
What absolutely batst stupid, psycho things to say.

Your first point is factually wrong. No-one is worried about the NHS being 'overrun' with people with mild symptoms. The whole point of the NHS being overrun is that it will lead to massively higher deaths (not just direct coronavirus deaths).

Your second point makes you sound like some sort of Nazi eugenics psycho.
Well done, you win the award for taking everything out of context and spinning it to whatever your agenda is.

I didn’t say the nhs would be overrun with mild symptoms, that the nhs would be overrun by people contracting it that required hospital treatment and that in all likelihood they would be there for 2 weeks and more. You don’t die quickly from it. And that will in turn lead to a strain on the NHS that impacts everything.

My second point wasn’t a point, it was just a..l you know what, you’re not worth explaining to.

heebeegeetee

26,935 posts

203 months

Thursday 26th March
quotequote all
Doofus said:
Buy a tabloid newspaper. Cut it into squares. Cheaper than the same quantity of bog roll.

I'm serious.


Don't know why the picture won't display, but if you click on it it shows where you can get free toilet paper.

Lambo FirstBlood

743 posts

134 months

Thursday 26th March
quotequote all
It amazes me how many opinions there are about what’s going to happen, how many people are going to get ill, what sort of a virus it really is, what the NHS are really worried about; all from people with no training, qualifications or experience.

We have some of the best medical minds in the world and if we follow their advise, a muppet on PH says we are “sheople”

I like many on here and many more around the world have had an enormous financial hit that in just weeks has wiped out 1/3 of 2 decades worth of effort. I’ve laid an entire workforce off too. Add in the fact that 2 x close friends have family members who have the virus and who are not expected to survive it (both under 60 BTW)

All we are being asked to do is stay at home. I just can’t get over the selfishness of going to the beach or driving for hours. I’d love to do both of those things but we are being asked to stay at home. Even if you think you know better, isn’t it worth doing what we are being asked to do in case the amateur infection experts among us are wrong?

Alextodrive

242 posts

30 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
Lambo FirstBlood said:
It amazes me how many opinions there are about what’s going to happen, how many people are going to get ill, what sort of a virus it really is, what the NHS are really worried about; all from people with no training, qualifications or experience.

We have some of the best medical minds in the world and if we follow their advise, a muppet on PH says we are “sheople”

I like many on here and many more around the world have had an enormous financial hit that in just weeks has wiped out 1/3 of 2 decades worth of effort. I’ve laid an entire workforce off too. Add in the fact that 2 x close friends have family members who have the virus and who are not expected to survive it (both under 60 BTW)

All we are being asked to do is stay at home. I just can’t get over the selfishness of going to the beach or driving for hours. I’d love to do both of those things but we are being asked to stay at home. Even if you think you know better, isn’t it worth doing what we are being asked to do in case the amateur infection experts among us are wrong?
Dont be ridiculous. I'd rather listen to someone who knows their way around a gearbox and read a few articles online.

Experts are over-rated know it alls.

And don't forget, the police are just bullied children who now want to bully us with penalty tickets for enjoying the empty roads. laugh

Edited by Alextodrive on Friday 27th March 00:18

lawyered07

59 posts

35 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
This thread is up there with the lambo thread for quality recent reading. Keep it coming...its making being stuck at home slightly more bearable

Edited to say, Lambo Firstblood your sensible comments aren't welcome here!

Chubbyross

791 posts

40 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
lawyered07 said:
This thread is up there with the lambo thread for quality recent reading. Keep it coming...its making being stuck at home slightly more bearable

Edited to say, Lambo Firstblood your sensible comments aren't welcome here!
Apparently we’re not stuck at home, according to some muppets on here. ;-)

DonkeyApple

37,371 posts

124 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
smartypants said:
There is actually a lot of truth in that. I think we may have had it and got immune. We also are a healthy and quite spread out nation, and don’t tend to travel a lot. Spain has had the issues because everyone fled the cities into their holiday homes and spread it far and wide. Which is why we have been so harsh on people doing the same here out of London

London will see many many more deaths I think, but it could just be limited there.

Again if we listen to what we’re told to do, we will get out of this in great shape. The death toll number is not he one to worry about it’s the the burden on the infrastructure and killing our economy that’s the issue.
I look at this a little differently. I think there is a chance the UK could be hit much harder. Every single day millions of UK residents all congregate in London. Millions travel in together and millions spend the whole day together and go out and about linking every single part of London together.

At the end of the day millions then travel back out to where they live where they have then been interacting with that local community. At the weekends all those commuting workers travel to see their separated families.

While this is occurring and has a reach to the furthest points of the UK there are hundreds of thousands of people from around the world flying in to the UK every day. And hundreds of thousands of UK residents flying out.

The reality is that we aren’t an island at all but one of the handful of global business and travel hubs on the planet with a domestic population that travels more than almost any other group of humans on the planet.

I suspect our risk is that no corner of the UK is in reality isolated from the rest of the world in the same way as very many Spanish or Italian towns are and the rate of geographical spread is probably going to be much quicker here. In Italy it has taken nearly a month to appear clearly in the South but in the UK I reckon that gap might be much shorter and put much more strain on the NHS.

It seems to be all about the next few weeks for us. Afterwhich we will have seen how this plays out first hand. We’ve been asked to behave in a certain way for just a very short period of time. It’s just a blink of an eye and the majority, including those who would normally stick a finger up at authority have understood why this is important and are doing so.

My wife was attacked yesterday by the usual fat, low functioning Englishman in a supermarket because she was wearing a mask. He deliberately went within inches of her face to explain why a true Englishman doesn’t need a mask. My wife knows where he works so we now know who he is.

On Sunday I was cycling with my eldest on the lane from the house when a jogger coming the other way actually crossed the lane from his side to specifically run between my daughter and I. It was the most bizarre and ultra passive aggressive act I’ve seen in a long time.

Down in the small town centre groups of motorbikers are still gathering to sit next to each other in the sun. The tough Englishmen who know that no virus can scare them nor possibly do any harm if they carry it aboit for a few weeks.

Outside the village Tesco’s groups of old people all huddle together to exchange data on which of their fellow care home residents has died before taking the virus back with them to kill some more.

More people than necessary will die because of these people but you can’t stop the L’Oriel people, especially when L’Oriel meets Dunning Kruger. And the most depressing thing to then appreciate is that it will be these exact same people who in the aftermath will be out there blaming the Govt for not doing more and blaming businesses for not doing more.

It is just a brief moment in our lives and it is not at all difficult to adhere to the requests from the Govt. and the vast majority will be. And as always, huge numbers are stepping in to the breach in any way they can, however small. And we will all get through this and we will help each other with the personal losses, whether human or fiscal many of us may incur.




Justin Case

1,483 posts

89 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
Some simple maths. The growth of a virus is an exponential function, which means that the number of cases in each period is a multiple of the number of cases in the previous period and so on. For example with a five day incubation period if each person transmits it to two others, in a month 64 people will have caught it. If on the other hand by social isolation then the transmission rate can be reduced to 1.5 then by the end of the same month only just over 11 people will have caught it. There is not enough evidence yet to put precise figures on this calculation, which is why estimates appear to vary so widely, but whichever model you use, staying in and not hooning around the countryside for the sake of it is so important

Solocle

1,430 posts

39 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
mrtwisty said:
Solocle said:
I could go for a 200 mile cycle without contravening government instructions. It's a distance I've done before (twice), and the advice is to do your usual exercise.

Will I? Hell no. Doing 200 miles in your proverbial backyard is just going to get boring. If I don't do it that way, there's a significant risk that I'm going to run out of energy and need picking up... which is an unnecessary journey.

I'm not going to curtail my distance unnecessarily - bread and butter 40 to 60 mile rides are still on the cards. Hell, if I feel adventurous, I could do 80-100. I don't necessarily need to stay on my doorstep for those distances, as long as I carry a suitable number of spares, and a suitable quantity of food and drink.
I'm surprised this post hasn't been picked up on by the more zealous posters on this thread. Perhaps because it doesn't mention driving?

I would suggest that riding 40 or 60 miles, even within a 5-10 mile radius of one's own home, is MUCH more risky (in terms of potential disease transmission) than a five mile drive, followed by a 2 hour walk in quiet open countryside, while maintaining sensible distancing and anti-viral transmission habits. A car vs cycle crash is often a serious event, requiring the intervention of many people over an extended timeframe. Like it or not, a fair few vehicles still need to continue using the roads.

There are still a LOT of people going to work that don't NEED to, since the advent of the massive government support that is coming on stream.

If we are really serious about limiting the transmission of this virus and giving the health service a fighting chance of doing its job, it is the movement of these non-essential workers that really needs to be curtailed for a few weeks.

To be clear, this has very little to do with the time these people spend on the roads, cooped up in their little metal quarantine boxes. It has much more to do with the 8 hours a day they spend in close proximity to one another.
In terms of disease transmission, your point would certainly be valid if I lived in an urban area. I don't - I'm out into NSL country roads after 300 yards. And yes, some vehicles do continue using the roads, and they will be going faster due to the reduced traffic. From what I've seen though, there's not terrible driving in my area, and even the (pretty well sighted) A roads are quiet. So risk strikes me as significantly lower than that in normal times.

smartypants

44,679 posts

124 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
I look at this a little differently. I think there is a chance the UK could be hit much harder. Every single day millions of UK residents all congregate in London. Millions travel in together and millions spend the whole day together and go out and about linking every single part of London together.

At the end of the day millions then travel back out to where they live where they have then been interacting with that local community. At the weekends all those commuting workers travel to see their separated families.

While this is occurring and has a reach to the furthest points of the UK there are hundreds of thousands of people from around the world flying in to the UK every day. And hundreds of thousands of UK residents flying out.

The reality is that we aren’t an island at all but one of the handful of global business and travel hubs on the planet with a domestic population that travels more than almost any other group of humans on the planet.

I suspect our risk is that no corner of the UK is in reality isolated from the rest of the world in the same way as very many Spanish or Italian towns are and the rate of geographical spread is probably going to be much quicker here. In Italy it has taken nearly a month to appear clearly in the South but in the UK I reckon that gap might be much shorter and put much more strain on the NHS.

It seems to be all about the next few weeks for us. Afterwhich we will have seen how this plays out first hand. We’ve been asked to behave in a certain way for just a very short period of time. It’s just a blink of an eye and the majority, including those who would normally stick a finger up at authority have understood why this is important and are doing so.

My wife was attacked yesterday by the usual fat, low functioning Englishman in a supermarket because she was wearing a mask. He deliberately went within inches of her face to explain why a true Englishman doesn’t need a mask. My wife knows where he works so we now know who he is.

On Sunday I was cycling with my eldest on the lane from the house when a jogger coming the other way actually crossed the lane from his side to specifically run between my daughter and I. It was the most bizarre and ultra passive aggressive act I’ve seen in a long time.

Down in the small town centre groups of motorbikers are still gathering to sit next to each other in the sun. The tough Englishmen who know that no virus can scare them nor possibly do any harm if they carry it aboit for a few weeks.

Outside the village Tesco’s groups of old people all huddle together to exchange data on which of their fellow care home residents has died before taking the virus back with them to kill some more.

More people than necessary will die because of these people but you can’t stop the L’Oriel people, especially when L’Oriel meets Dunning Kruger. And the most depressing thing to then appreciate is that it will be these exact same people who in the aftermath will be out there blaming the Govt for not doing more and blaming businesses for not doing more.

It is just a brief moment in our lives and it is not at all difficult to adhere to the requests from the Govt. and the vast majority will be. And as always, huge numbers are stepping in to the breach in any way they can, however small. And we will all get through this and we will help each other with the personal losses, whether human or fiscal many of us may incur.
That's disappointing to hear. I suppose because I am actually going nowhere (apart from my daily run) I am not seeing these things. However I did hear that a few of my shooting buddies had a lock in just the other day at a local pub (30 or so of them). I just don't get that mentality, it really isn't that hard to just sit down for once and do as you're told. What harm can that do?


mrtwisty

2,857 posts

120 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
Solocle said:
mrtwisty said:
Solocle said:
I could go for a 200 mile cycle without contravening government instructions. It's a distance I've done before (twice), and the advice is to do your usual exercise.

Will I? Hell no. Doing 200 miles in your proverbial backyard is just going to get boring. If I don't do it that way, there's a significant risk that I'm going to run out of energy and need picking up... which is an unnecessary journey.

I'm not going to curtail my distance unnecessarily - bread and butter 40 to 60 mile rides are still on the cards. Hell, if I feel adventurous, I could do 80-100. I don't necessarily need to stay on my doorstep for those distances, as long as I carry a suitable number of spares, and a suitable quantity of food and drink.
I'm surprised this post hasn't been picked up on by the more zealous posters on this thread. Perhaps because it doesn't mention driving?

I would suggest that riding 40 or 60 miles, even within a 5-10 mile radius of one's own home, is MUCH more risky (in terms of potential disease transmission) than a five mile drive, followed by a 2 hour walk in quiet open countryside, while maintaining sensible distancing and anti-viral transmission habits. A car vs cycle crash is often a serious event, requiring the intervention of many people over an extended timeframe. Like it or not, a fair few vehicles still need to continue using the roads.

There are still a LOT of people going to work that don't NEED to, since the advent of the massive government support that is coming on stream.

If we are really serious about limiting the transmission of this virus and giving the health service a fighting chance of doing its job, it is the movement of these non-essential workers that really needs to be curtailed for a few weeks.

To be clear, this has very little to do with the time these people spend on the roads, cooped up in their little metal quarantine boxes. It has much more to do with the 8 hours a day they spend in close proximity to one another.
In terms of disease transmission, your point would certainly be valid if I lived in an urban area. I don't - I'm out into NSL country roads after 300 yards. And yes, some vehicles do continue using the roads, and they will be going faster due to the reduced traffic. From what I've seen though, there's not terrible driving in my area, and even the (pretty well sighted) A roads are quiet. So risk strikes me as significantly lower than that in normal times.
I think you misunderstand me. The transmission risk isn't because you're in the open air instead of a metal box - the increased risk comes from the higher likelihood ( especially on nsl country roads) of an accident necessitating a lot of close contact from a large number of people needing to look after you for weeks or months, from the first responders to the surgeons to the ward staff etc.

Superleg48

948 posts

88 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
All of the arguments being raised about risk comparisons, whilst valid are missing the fundamental point. The instruction, not advice, is to stay at home unless essential to leave. It is not essential to drive for a jolly it is not essential to cycle 100 or 200 miles, it is not essential to run 5 or 10k. Exercise is allowed, but the intention of that advice is you start from home and return to home ( not drive somewhere first). Just go for a walk once a day for a couple of weeks. You can do that wherever you live and still manage the 2m social distancing advice, be it city, town or countryside.


Boosted LS1

19,049 posts

215 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
We have been advised by the government that we can go for a walk, jog, take exercise. It's not hard to understand is it?

Obviously conduct social distancing when out, wear lube and don't touch surfaces. That's not hard to comprehend either.

There seem to be plenty of control freaks on here. Fortunately I don't see that 'sort' when I'm walking in the countryside. i see cyclists and walkers behaving sensibly.

Vroomer

1,486 posts

135 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
smartypants said:
However I did hear that a few of my shooting buddies had a lock in just the other day at a local pub (30 or so of them). I
Shameful, selfish behaviour.

Far Cough

1,285 posts

123 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
Just SORN`d the car to take temptation out the way. I get £50 bonus each month as a thankyou !!!

Solocle

1,430 posts

39 months

Friday 27th March
quotequote all
mrtwisty said:
I think you misunderstand me. The transmission risk isn't because you're in the open air instead of a metal box - the increased risk comes from the higher likelihood ( especially on nsl country roads) of an accident necessitating a lot of close contact from a large number of people needing to look after you for weeks or months, from the first responders to the surgeons to the ward staff etc.
I think you might be right about the country roads, although the ones in my case aren't the narrow kind. On today's loop (23 miles), 13 were on A roads, which were quiet enough to be pleasant - 5 miles on the A30, and plenty of times that all I could hear was birdsong. I think B roads were maybe slightly preferable, but there wasn't too much in it. The lanes possibly swing in the direction of people driving too fast because they think that nothing's around.

My main concern with these shorter loops is that I'm working at fairly high intensity for an hour or less, which means I'm averaging in the region of 20 mph. I actually caught myself marginally speeding in a 30 zone today... longer rides mean a more sedate pace, generally. I say generally because a few weeks back a well directed wind let me do Oxford-Cambridge at over 20 mph average, but that was unusual.

Oh, and the high intensity stuff also can trigger quite a nasty cough due to mild asthma. I got one today after pacing a lorry up a hill at 22!

sharepointalex

120 posts

62 months

Saturday 28th March
quotequote all
Just dropping this one here (hoping it doesn’t spark some angry responses.) - https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.independent.co....

National police chiefs council have said it is not illegal to drive somewhere, even more than once a day to carry out exercise.

Interestingly if you read the actually government regulations, it’s not limited to only one form of exercise a day either..

Clearly hasn’t been well communicated to each police force that’s for sure.

I’m not saying we should all go out and do this, I just thought it was an interesting read.

Teddy Lop

3,128 posts

22 months

Saturday 28th March
quotequote all
The roads might be near empty, but anyone finding an alarming high number of dawdling tts? I'm talking frustratingly slow - 20 in 30, 30ish on safe NSL A/B roads - I know we should all try to take a bit more care for obvious reasons and I'm down with that but this is just moronic.