Stupid maintenance requirements

Stupid maintenance requirements

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Discussion

Ian_sUK

726 posts

144 months

Wednesday 3rd March
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donkmeister said:
Vectra C with the Z28 engines... Changing the headlamp bulbs involved removing the headlamp unit, which involved removing the front bumper (or at the very least, removing enough fixings to bend it down to the ground). Why? Some bugger had put engine right where the bulbs go in and out.
Another one for the Vectra C that caused some disagreement when I posted it before... Removing the rear bank of sparkplugs involves removing the inlet manifold. I think someone claimed they'd managed without, but I can't see how. I know Vauxhall had to remove mine as they forgot to do up the clips on the boost pipe leading to a thrilling "limp home" moment as I pulled onto a busy DC and went N/A.
It's quite doable on the Saab 9-3 version having done it myself.

red_slr

12,500 posts

153 months

Wednesday 3rd March
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The 355 engine out is not a big of a deal as some like to make out.

Yes its not cheap - looking about 1200 plus parts at an indy however there are a couple of points to consider.

Firstly, its not really an engine out like a normal car. The car is 100% designed for this. With the correct stands the engine, gearbox and rear suspension will all come out as one unit in about 3-4 hours.

Secondly, there is so much heat in the engine bay you want to be able to inspect everything - having the engine out makes this so much easier. It also means that the fluids will all be changed, oil, water. AC re-gassed etc.

If you put a regular car in for a cam belt change it will prob cost 600 and they will change just the belt. On the 355 its more like a full fluid change etc.

Add to this that its fairly safe to do the belts every 5 years these days with better quality tensioners etc then its not actually *that* bad if you look at say £2k bill every 5 years for the belt service.

V8 Bob

170 posts

89 months

Wednesday 3rd March
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MC Bodge said:
Mk5 Mondeo headlamp bulbs require the front bumper (many fasteners, some of which require knuckle-scraping and not to be replaced after the first time)to be mostly removed.

Ideal on a dark night at the side of the road, it is not. A slight change to the design could have prevented the need for this.
Can replace bulbs by taking out centre grill top fixings, pull forward at top I used to stuff rags in , headlamp is unscrewed then inner corner can slide behind grill and out it comes. Not easy first time but easier than taking bumper off.

MC Bodge

15,472 posts

139 months

Thursday 4th March
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V8 Bob said:
MC Bodge said:
Mk5 Mondeo headlamp bulbs require the front bumper (many fasteners, some of which require knuckle-scraping and not to be replaced after the first time)to be mostly removed.

Ideal on a dark night at the side of the road, it is not. A slight change to the design could have prevented the need for this.
Can replace bulbs by taking out centre grill top fixings, pull forward at top I used to stuff rags in , headlamp is unscrewed then inner corner can slide behind grill and out it comes. Not easy first time but easier than taking bumper off.
Interesting. Are we talking about the current Mk5 model? (The MK4 could be done as you describe)
The Mk5 is a sod to slide back in the headlamp unit even with the bumper off, though.



Edited by MC Bodge on Thursday 4th March 09:05

RazerSauber

1,101 posts

24 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
Calibra V6, removing inlet manifold to change spark plugs on left bank. That is always quite annoying.

R50 Mini having plastic coolant pipe connectors going to the heater matrix. The job isn't actually that hard but it's annoying that they put 4 spring clips on and 2 have to be accessed from underneath right at the back of the engine when it invariably snaps. Oh and the brake flexis to the rear calipers have to go on perfectly otherwise the banjo bolt won't screw in. Hugely frustrating when the hose wants to fight you.

Minor annoyances compared to some who are taking whole vehicles apart to replace a seal though.

RizzoTheRat

20,553 posts

156 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
Somewhat out of scope of the thread, but I came across an article the other day on US Coast Guard Icebreaker that had an engine fire and had to replace the engine. This involved cutting out a massive section of the hull and welding it back up afterwards yikes Makes working on cars seem simple.

Hugo Stiglitz

30,738 posts

175 months

Thursday 4th March
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vikingaero said:
Mazda 5 diseasal.

On the first service I asked the Service Reception for an estimated cost, thinking £200 was about right for an oil and filter splash n dash.

She came back and said "I'm so sorry, I hope you're ready for this... It's £576 because this diesel engine needs the cam cover removed to check the valve clearances and we have to refit a new gasket."

[Reminder to self: check servicing costs when buying new cars]
Did the dealer group have 3 letters to its name?

thewarlock

878 posts

9 months

Thursday 4th March
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RizzoTheRat said:
Somewhat out of scope of the thread, but I came across an article the other day on US Coast Guard Icebreaker that had an engine fire and had to replace the engine. This involved cutting out a massive section of the hull and welding it back up afterwards yikes Makes working on cars seem simple.
Fairly common. If something's not designed to come out a vessel more than 2 or 3 times throughout it's life, you tend to use "soft patches" as opposed to a bolted plate. No maintenance required and they're stronger.

andburg

4,596 posts

133 months

Thursday 4th March
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Renault Wind 1.6

Timing belt requires engine mount to be removed and the engine partially lifted out to get clearance...I decided to pay for that one

Pan Pan Pan

7,696 posts

75 months

Thursday 4th March
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thewarlock said:
RizzoTheRat said:
Somewhat out of scope of the thread, but I came across an article the other day on US Coast Guard Icebreaker that had an engine fire and had to replace the engine. This involved cutting out a massive section of the hull and welding it back up afterwards yikes Makes working on cars seem simple.
Fairly common. If something's not designed to come out a vessel more than 2 or 3 times throughout it's life, you tend to use "soft patches" as opposed to a bolted plate. No maintenance required and they're stronger.
This is one of the advantages of steel hull boats, in that any damage to the hull, (and as in this case) an engine change, by removing part of the hull / superstructure, is a common, and (relatively easily) carried out procedure, which can allow the hull to be returned to an as built condition.
Fortunately on the boat my brother and I use. The main cabin roof, has a hatch, which is the same size as the engine bay below, which will allow the (large engine) to be lifted straight up through the boat, from its bearers.

Charles Sweeney

101 posts

59 months

Thursday 4th March
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TinyMonster said:
They should have a like button here!

Hugo Stiglitz

30,738 posts

175 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
davwill said:

Ford Fiesta all this to remove a leaf that had got into the heater motor and was makeing a bit of a noise.
And who was paying the bill.

Did the seats really have to come out?

I've stripped a dash on a Subaru to that degree very easily.

mat205125

16,103 posts

177 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
andburg said:
Renault Wind 1.6

Timing belt requires engine mount to be removed and the engine partially lifted out to get clearance...I decided to pay for that one
Pretty standard for an fwd car

AW111

6,548 posts

97 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
andburg said:
Renault Wind 1.6

Timing belt requires engine mount to be removed and the engine partially lifted out to get clearance...I decided to pay for that one
My MR2 has that design - the engine mount is only 3 bolts, and the other mounts have enough play that the engine just needs to be levered up a little bit. No big deal.

Setting clearances on 20 valves with under-bucket shims, however, is a real PITA, as the clearances are a pain to measure, and the cams have to come out to replace the shims.

donkmeister

3,383 posts

64 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
Ian_sUK said:
donkmeister said:
Vectra C with the Z28 engines... Changing the headlamp bulbs involved removing the headlamp unit, which involved removing the front bumper (or at the very least, removing enough fixings to bend it down to the ground). Why? Some bugger had put engine right where the bulbs go in and out.
Another one for the Vectra C that caused some disagreement when I posted it before... Removing the rear bank of sparkplugs involves removing the inlet manifold. I think someone claimed they'd managed without, but I can't see how. I know Vauxhall had to remove mine as they forgot to do up the clips on the boost pipe leading to a thrilling "limp home" moment as I pulled onto a busy DC and went N/A.
It's quite doable on the Saab 9-3 version having done it myself.
I've just seen this video on how to do it on the SAAB - still quite a bit of disassembly that shouldn't need to be done!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8rmH-9CS5A

donkmeister

3,383 posts

64 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
RazerSauber said:
Calibra V6, removing inlet manifold to change spark plugs on left bank. That is always quite annoying.
Isn't the Calibra transverse-engined?

gforceg

3,466 posts

143 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
donkmeister said:
RazerSauber said:
Calibra V6, removing inlet manifold to change spark plugs on left bank. That is always quite annoying.
Isn't the Calibra transverse-engined?
I thought the same but I suppose an engine still has a left and right bank if you look along it without ref to the layout. We normally say inlet and exhaust side for clarity.

Zoobeef

5,922 posts

122 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
gforceg said:
donkmeister said:
RazerSauber said:
Calibra V6, removing inlet manifold to change spark plugs on left bank. That is always quite annoying.
Isn't the Calibra transverse-engined?
I thought the same but I suppose an engine still has a left and right bank if you look along it without ref to the layout. We normally say inlet and exhaust side for clarity.
On a V engine the exhaust is on both sides. Given the crank pulley is normally the front of the engine then thats your reference for left and right.

MXRod

1,927 posts

111 months

Thursday 4th March
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Has anyone mentioned the bypass hose on an "A" series BMC engine, MINI etc , cylinder head off job

gforceg

3,466 posts

143 months

Thursday 4th March
quotequote all
Zoobeef said:
On a V engine the exhaust is on both sides. Given the crank pulley is normally the front of the engine then thats your reference for left and right.
That's what my first sentence meant. The second sentence was just my fingers running on. (A bit like this.)