what happened to using a bucket and a sponge?

what happened to using a bucket and a sponge?

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rampageturke

1,074 posts

126 months

Tuesday 6th April
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Ranger 6 said:
I used the one bucket method at the weekend with some polish and it looked lovely for a couple of hours.

The next morning it was covered in saharan dust from said cloud and looked sh*t, mind you not half as bad as it will be when I drive it up the lane - there's a stable on each corner and a Polo club down the lane. I'll leave the rest to your imagination.......
you need to wax as well as polish otherwise its a bit of a wasted endeavour. Personally I got one of my last cars properly cleaned, polished and waxed and then did the upkeep myself until it started to look a bit ropey and then got it properly done again.

Edited by rampageturke on Tuesday 6th April 13:31

Ranger 6

6,306 posts

213 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I gave you the edited version - bits of it were compounded too thumbup

nuttywobbler

236 posts

26 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I still use a sponge, although I do replace it twice a year. I also try to wash my car when it's raining, as it saves me having to dry it. 2 year old leased Mercedes.

swisstoni

10,592 posts

243 months

Tuesday 6th April
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nuttywobbler said:
I still use a sponge, although I do replace it twice a year. I also try to wash my car when it's raining, as it saves me having to dry it. 2 year old leased Mercedes.
Good tip, no water spots. Neighbours think you’re nuts though. hehe

TurboHatchback

3,924 posts

117 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I started using a bucket and sponge, then after a while I discovered there were more 'products' available to make cars look shiny and bought/used a selection. Then I realised I couldn't be bothered because washing cars is a total waste of time, now my cars are washed once in my ownership, to take pictures for sale. Otherwise they are cleaned by the rain and driving through puddles, if the lights become obscured I'll wipe them clean but that's it.

Prohibiting

1,256 posts

82 months

Tuesday 6th April
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TurboHatchback said:
I started using a bucket and sponge, then after a while I discovered there were more 'products' available to make cars look shiny and bought/used a selection. Then I realised I couldn't be bothered because washing cars is a total waste of time, now my cars are washed once in my ownership, to take pictures for sale. Otherwise they are cleaned by the rain and driving through puddles, if the lights become obscured I'll wipe them clean but that's it.
What about the rear number plate? rolleyes

otolith

43,912 posts

168 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I spent some time on Sunday cleaning all three cars.

I had a Karcher snow foam kit, which was crap. It just didn't work. I'd bought an Autoglym "Polar Blast" one some time ago to replace it, which I was sceptical of, but it basically covered everything in sight in foam. Not bad.

I cleaned their wheels, then snow foamed them, pressure washed it off then washed them by hand.

This was the first time I cleaned the Mercedes since I bought it, so I also clayed it, polished and waxed it. It's more something your dad has in his shed that your detailing obsessive's unicorn spunk, but it's surprising how much things come up with a bit of Super Resin Polish and a DA polisher.


alorotom

9,068 posts

151 months

Tuesday 6th April
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otolith said:
I spent some time on Sunday cleaning all three cars.

I had a Karcher snow foam kit, which was crap. It just didn't work. I'd bought an Autoglym "Polar Blast" one some time ago to replace it, which I was sceptical of, but it basically covered everything in sight in foam. Not bad.

I cleaned their wheels, then snow foamed them, pressure washed it off then washed them by hand.

This was the first time I cleaned the Mercedes since I bought it, so I also clayed it, polished and waxed it. It's more something your dad has in his shed that your detailing obsessive's unicorn spunk, but it's surprising how much things come up with a bit of Super Resin Polish and a DA polisher.

I used to be fanatical about cleaning and detailing and pre-child would often spend all weekend doing my car once a month and then most Saturdays at least half the day. Spent literally thousands on waxes, glazes, sealants, polishes, special pads and cloths, a couple of DAs, a rotary, etc.... then I totally fell out of love with it all when one of my cars was repeatedly vandalised.

For a while I used a valeter who used to come to the office I was working at once a month which was handy and he only charged £40 for the half day and it was always immaculate which was cheap for a big SUV. I was only contracted there for a 18mths though so it didn't last.

My current car (a leased Skoda) goes back in 4mths time, its a 3 year lease. It has yet to have it first wash (and I was unimpressed that the dealer didn't wash it when it was serviced in September last year)

ro250

1,302 posts

21 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I look after the 2 family cars and will wash them weekly normally. As others have said, it's quite therapeutic and, especially in the last year, it's a lot better for you than sitting on your backside watching Netflix.

Although I have a few shampoos and sealants, it isn't really an expensive thing to do well on your drive, you just need the inclination. I must admit, I've never quite understood the people who only clean a car when they are selling it.

Chap over the road just had a brand new car delivered and he washed it straight away. Even if you don't know your car washing techniques, the fact he was putting the sponge on the ground at various points in the wash was making me wince!

My neighbour never cleans her car and it looks disgusting. What I found fascinating was she had a bump recently (her own doing - small dent and bumper crack) and got it fixed immediately. I couldn't even see the dent for the 3 years of crud around so I don't get her logic for bothering.

nickfrog

13,788 posts

181 months

Tuesday 6th April
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otolith said:
I spent some time on Sunday cleaning all three cars.

I had a Karcher snow foam kit, which was crap. It just didn't work. I'd bought an Autoglym "Polar Blast" one some time ago to replace it, which I was sceptical of, but it basically covered everything in sight in foam. Not bad.

I cleaned their wheels, then snow foamed them, pressure washed it off then washed them by hand.

This was the first time I cleaned the Mercedes since I bought it, so I also clayed it, polished and waxed it. It's more something your dad has in his shed that your detailing obsessive's unicorn spunk, but it's surprising how much things come up with a bit of Super Resin Polish and a DA polisher.

Nice job although the driveway may also need some of your magic applied to it.;)

otolith

43,912 posts

168 months

Tuesday 6th April
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nickfrog said:
Nice job although the driveway may also need some of your magic applied to it.;)
You sound like my neighbour laugh

I've been away a lot because of lockdown, so it's worse for weeds than normal, but the whole thing needs taking up and replacing. I'd also like to fit an underground propane tank and may be forced to fit a sewage treatment unit, though, so there's no point doing the drive and then digging it up again.

M_O_W_G_L_I

22 posts

219 months

Tuesday 6th April
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Pistonheader101 said:
does anyone still use the good old fashioned method anymore?
Me! One bucket, 2 sponges (one just for wheels and tyres), that's all I need. Wet the car with hose, wash it top to bottom, rinse with hose. Take it out to dry it off a bit, let it get dirty again.

I will get involved if the birds crap on it though to prevent paint damage.

bad company

14,036 posts

230 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I’ve had to wash my own car the last few weeks while the car wash was closed. I’m using this stuff, is someone going to say it’s no good and will remove the paint from my pride & joy?

I don’t enjoy car washing and it causes back ache for me though I must say that it’s satisfying.




320d is all you need

1,733 posts

7 months

Tuesday 6th April
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M_O_W_G_L_I said:
Pistonheader101 said:
does anyone still use the good old fashioned method anymore?
Me! One bucket, 2 sponges (one just for wheels and tyres), that's all I need. Wet the car with hose, wash it top to bottom, rinse with hose. Take it out to dry it off a bit, let it get dirty again.

I will get involved if the birds crap on it though to prevent paint damage.


I wouldn't care about paint damage with that wash routine! biggrin

Prohibiting

1,256 posts

82 months

Tuesday 6th April
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My wheel woolies turned up today and I’ve already put them to use... game changer. Can’t believe I’ve been making do with a brush from a dust pan set for so long. Also the big yellow brush is also new and fantastic for doing the face of the wheel and tyre wall.

I pretty much have every base covered without having spent thousands like some cleaning nuts. My collection has been slowly built up over 10 years and it’s fair to say I have spent a few hundred. However, you don’t need to spend £100 on a single tub of wax. Bilt Hamber double wax at £14 a tub has raving reviews. You can also save a lot by buying concentrates and watering them down to the recommended ration which means some products can literally last for 10 years.

I tend to stick to a few brands otherwise it can get overwhelming with so much choice

Shampoo: Bilt Hamber Auto Wash concentrate
All purpose cleaner: Bilt Hamber Surfex HD concentrate
Wheel cleaner: Valet Pro Bilberry concentrate
Tar remover: Tardis tar & glue
Iron fall out remover: Bilt Hamber Korrosol
Clay: Farecla G3 Pro clay mitt (game changer)
Tyre gel: Auto Finesse
Black plastic dressing: 303 Aerospace
Glass cleaner: Any supermarket stuff
Quick detailer: Bilt Hamber Auto QD
Cleanser (before wax): Bilt Hamber cleanser fluid
Wax: Bilt Hamber double speed

Polishes: Menzerna
Polishing pads: Lake Country hydrotech
Dual action polisher: DAS6

Wash mitt: Gtechniq WM2 microfibre mitt
Drying towels: Chemical Guys Woolly Mammoth
Wheel brushes: Wheel woolies large and medium
General purpose detailing brush: Valet Pro
Wheel face brush: Martin Cox brush

Any decent microfibre clothes (a lot of the Bilt Hamber stuff comes with a free very nice microfibre cloth.



If you’re a beginner and want to improve your game, the shampoo, wheel cleaner, iron remover, tar remover, tyre gel, wash mitt, clay mitt, quick detailer and drying towel will make a world of difference (iron remover, tar remover and clay mitt only used once every 6 months).

Edited by Prohibiting on Tuesday 6th April 19:14

nismo48

561 posts

171 months

Tuesday 6th April
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Thats not a bad philosophy...
There are more important things in life.. nerd

M_O_W_G_L_I said:
Pistonheader101 said:
does anyone still use the good old fashioned method anymore?
Me! One bucket, 2 sponges (one just for wheels and tyres), that's all I need. Wet the car with hose, wash it top to bottom, rinse with hose. Take it out to dry it off a bit, let it get dirty again.

I will get involved if the birds crap on it though to prevent paint damage.

Tony427

2,758 posts

197 months

Tuesday 6th April
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My company sells car wash chemicals into the forecourt marketplace so there;s a very good chance that if you have ever used an automatic car wash or a jet wash, certainly in the West Midlands, you are using our stuff. We do not supply the hand car wash marketplace as the price points are so low. Many of their chemicals appear to come over from Russia and Eastern Europe via shell companies in the EU.

The tales of brick acid wheel cleaners are genuine.

Unfortunately for the hand car wash market since lockdown has closed them down the talk on the street is that as most of the staff were employed off the books cash only, furlough payments were not forthcoming so no wages meant a great many Albanians, Lithuanians, Romanians etc went home and now post Brexit cannot get back. So no staff means no car washing.

However that does mean that forecourt roll over machines and jet washes are going ballistic. We can just about keep up with demand for the chemicals. By the way, the more modern soft brush machines will not damage your car but do not take anything in there with loose trim. Really, don't do that it will end in tears. Re jet washes, before the brush gets anywhere near your car give the brush itself a good blast with the lance to clear the grit the last user coated it in.

Modern chemicals are really good both at cleaning and waxing your car both in rollovers and in jet washes. Don't skimp on the wax programme btw it will pay dividends in keeping your car clean. Some of our customers offer a caramic coating as part of the top wash programme. Its brilliant, I use it myself. When you have a warehouse full of chemicals some inevitably finds its way home. Talk about beading and shine !!

On some jet wash machines we have just launched an iron remover wheel cleaner. It works tremendous well and is rightly very, very popular. Probably our best selling chemical.

Having said all that unless I'm testing a machine I wash my cars myself by hand. Powerwash to get the worst off, and then yes, a bucket and sponge, tepid water with a one step shampoo and wax. Twice a year I put some ceramic coat in the water as well. Spray wheel cleaner on the wheels and exhaust tips, and whilst thats dissolving the brake dust and diesel soot, a wash down from the roof, then windows then doors then sills. Rinse wheels then wash them.

This means that the paintwork has had lubrication to enable the dirt to be rolled up by the detergent in the shampoo, and has at least one protectorant and occasionally two. Dirt doesn't really stick to car that has lots of protection, especially if its ceramic based.

Then its rinse off and if I'm feeling particularly dilligent I'll apply a Carnuaba spray wax using a microfibre towel thus drying and polishing the car at the same time. Spray on tyre dressing may also be used, because why not.

Takes about 40 minutes. I find it theraputic.








Edited by Tony427 on Tuesday 6th April 21:34

fourstardan

934 posts

108 months

Tuesday 6th April
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You say this but I think the main change in cleaning technique at the first stages has been down to the invention of the pressure washer.

For finishing cars it's definitely become a bit of a fetish for some, I've been through it a bit myself with my nicer cars, now I just do a protection in spring/autumn so I just need to jet wash off any dirt that forms.

shtu

2,141 posts

110 months

Tuesday 6th April
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Tony427 said:
Twice a year I put some ceramic coat in the water as well.
I'm intrigued, that sounds like my kind of effort level. What could a punter like me get hold of?

ro250

1,302 posts

21 months

Tuesday 6th April
quotequote all
shtu said:
Tony427 said:
Twice a year I put some ceramic coat in the water as well.
I'm intrigued, that sounds like my kind of effort level. What could a punter like me get hold of?
Slightly unusual reference to ceramic there. You don't add a ceramic coating to the water or do it a couple of times a year. Ceramic coatings are a semi-permanent coating applied after full paintwork correction and decontamination.

Edited by ro250 on Tuesday 6th April 22:30