RE: Nissan GT-R GT3 offered as road-legal GT23

RE: Nissan GT-R GT3 offered as road-legal GT23

Wednesday 7th April

GT-R GT3 offered as road-legal GT23

JRM race team turns competition-spec Godzilla into limited-edition road-going monster



Not content with the performance already fizzing from a standard Nissan GT-R?ย Well, good news: JR Motosport, based in Daventry, is intending to produce 23 examples of what is essentially a road-going GT3 car - anticipated to cost about ยฃ600k apiece excluding VAT.ย A company spokesperson told PH that the price won't buy you a GT3 machine with numberplates, as awesome as that would be, but rather a comprehensively re-engineered car that prioritises handling, balance and aerodynamic grip over outright power. The GT23 is set to have around 685hp, but key to its character is a 1,350kg kerbweight, 50:50 weight distribution and, potentially best of all, rear-wheel drive.

Using the in-built advantages of the GT3 shell, chassis and driveline, the GT23 mounts Nissanโ€™s 3.8-litre twin-turbo V6 150mm lower and further back in the structure, making it front-mid engined and taking the centre of gravity to around knee-height. The structure is stiffer, the engine is 85hp more potent than even the โ€˜regularโ€™ Nismoย (giving the car 507hp-per-tonne) and the tracks are wider. Everything is GT-R on steroids - but not without some careful road-honing. The engine, for example, gets more durable internals to enable 6,000km (3,700-mile) service intervals, which, for context, is only 800 miles off the Evo VI Tommi Makinen Mitsubishi UK is selling.


Anyway, when it comes to the R35, JRM certainly knows its stuff, having raced them extensively and even won the FIA GT1 World Championship in 2011 with a car that wore the number 23 (explaining the run total). Darren Andrew, the outfitโ€™s commercial and projects manager, told PH that the GT23s are to be built using all-new parts, with in-house developed solutions to the many problems presented to a race machine when itโ€™s confronted with the varied lifestyle of a road car. With space cleared in the nose thanks to the engineโ€™s new positioning, Andrew said a bucket cooling system, engineered by technical director Elliot Dason-Barber, now ensures the race-grade VR38DETT V6 remains to temperature, even โ€œduring trips to the shopsโ€.

Andrew was adamant that this is not another numbers-chasing GT-R, but rather one to satisfy the subjective demands of proper driving enthusiasts. He said JRM โ€œcould have gone to Litchfield and asked for 1,500hpโ€, but that this project is โ€œall about agility against raw power, cornering speeds and aerodynamicsโ€. Work has been done to ensure the six-speed sequential gearbox, brakes and aerodynamics are suited to both road and track environments. The bits you see on the pictured car, โ€œChassis Zeroโ€, are very much prototype, with Andrew noting that the final rear diffuser will be carbonfibre. But itโ€™s almost all there, having now completed its first shakedown run.

In an unusual twist, Andrew said the pandemic actually encouraged an upgrading of specification, because JRMโ€™s engineers found themselves short of motorsport projects to keep busy with. Andrew said the original GT23 was being developed so it would cost customers about ยฃ385k excluding VAT, but that 2020 provided the time to take the spec up a few notches. The finished car will come with 18-inch wheels, ripe for slicks, as well as 20-inch carbonfibre alloys to be used with road rubber. Andrew suggested that while the ยฃ600k plus VAT price buys a ready to roll car, buyers can inevitably go further with their own requests.


โ€œWe wonโ€™t charge for things like paint colour or interior Alcantara trim, so a buyer neednโ€™t spend more than the โ€˜baseโ€™ figure,โ€ he said, โ€œalthough if a customer wants to make a car their own, or add a few features, they canโ€. The slightly softened race interior, for example, doesnโ€™t come with cup holders. But JRM can โ€œprint one with the 3D printerโ€, should a buyer request it. Perhaps it could be hung off the roll cage, which comes in full FIA spec and surrounds the bucket seats, harnesses and other authentic race-grade items that ought to ensure that no one confuses a GT23 with a stripped-out GT-R. Thereโ€™s not even a space to fit a radio and speakers.

If that's piqued your interest, you won't have long to wait before JRM releases some test footage to give us a better idea of how the GT3 GT-R's soundtrack has been finessed for road use. Once Chassis Zero is finished, Andrew said customer builds can start, with interested buyers encouraged to reach out as soon as possible, for obvious reasons. The lead time is said to be four to five months between a deposit payment and a car with your name on it rolling out of the JRM workshop. Collectors will have no doubt noted that this is all happening in whatโ€™s set to be the final full year of R35 production, but JRM wants cars to go to keen track day drivers, too - to the extent that itโ€™s offering transportation and track support on top of the GT23 package. Where do we sign up?










Author
Discussion

leglessAlex

Original Poster:

3,958 posts

105 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
I know it's a prototype, I'm sure the driving performance will be exceptional and I'm not sure that I actually can think of any direct competitors off the top of my head, but even so...

...isn't £720k quite a lot for a (heavily) tuned GTR? Does anyone really want a GT3 car for the road?

Yeah, I know, typical PH comment moaning about price and I'm usually of the opinion that these sort of creations are actually reasonably priced for the amount of man hours, but I really can't get past that many hundreds of thousands for what it is.

GreatScott2016

96 posts

52 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
leglessAlex said:
I know it's a prototype, I'm sure the driving performance will be exceptional and I'm not sure that I actually can think of any direct competitors off the top of my head, but even so...

...isn't £720k quite a lot for a (heavily) tuned GTR? Does anyone really want a GT3 car for the road?

Yeah, I know, typical PH comment moaning about price and I'm usually of the opinion that these sort of creations are actually reasonably priced for the amount of man hours, but I really can't get past that many hundreds of thousands for what it is.
Have to agree with you .. will no doubt sell but that’s a serious premium to pay.

paul13

199 posts

166 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
Agree with OP, whilst I can appreciate the workmanship and hours developing the car, if I had £720K to spend on a road car (and I don't), then this wouldn't be it.

Twoshoe

575 posts

148 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
And no cup-holders - I'm out.

Gecko1978

4,756 posts

121 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
would a rival for this not be one of the mclaren specials they keep producing, a 911 GT2 RS maybe, one of those Astons with the big wing etc, Ferrari specials. Course you could argue none of them are true GT3 cars but then i doubt many people are buying a track day toy at this price. For 700k this is like the SVJ I saw a london run around reality is rarely do these gert used on the track. But your money buy what you like

Kawasicki

9,002 posts

199 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
What’s the active safety like? Is distended leather compulsory? Does it have analog or digital handling?

big_rob_sydney

2,729 posts

158 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
I wonder what kind of formula car you could buy for that money?

Maccmike8

148 posts

18 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
A slightly less aerod version would appeal to me more.

When BMW did the 320si, that engine sat lower and further back but was wholly more discreet.

Then again, anybody spending that kinda of money on this, doesnt want discreet?

GR_WILL

654 posts

42 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
The rear wing is bigger than that of a light aircraft!

markclow

104 posts

95 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
God I love GTRs.

Best car I have ever owned by a mile.

Epic cars.

take-good-care-of-the-forest-dewey

1,175 posts

19 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
Gecko1978 said:
would a rival for this not be one of the mclaren specials they keep producing, a 911 GT2 RS maybe, one of those Astons with the big wing etc, Ferrari specials. Course you could argue none of them are true GT3 cars but then i doubt many people are buying a track day toy at this price. For 700k this is like the SVJ I saw a london run around reality is rarely do these gert used on the track. But your money buy what you like
It's probably singer or alfaholics re: nearest conceptual peer.

Starr with bare shell and coneyely upgrade every component.

leef44

2,145 posts

117 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
GR_WILL said:
The rear wing is bigger than that of a light aircraft!
Oh, this car will fly tongue out

AdamV12AMR

1,322 posts

120 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
When I first saw the pic on the homepage, my immediate assumption was that it was an article about a new LEGO Nissan GTR.

PhantomPH

3,678 posts

189 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
Kudos to the builders, but I just can't help but think that someone with a GTR could go and get a silly body kit, some suspension and engine mods on their own car and have something that to 99% of us would feel the same to drive. And for a hell of a lot less than three-quarters of a mil.

Feels like a car without a market. Hope I'm wrong, tho.

SWoll

10,827 posts

222 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
take-good-care-of-the-forest-dewey said:
It's probably singer or alfaholics re: nearest conceptual peer.

Starr with bare shell and coneyely upgrade every component.
So, this or a Singer 911 then. I know where my money would go.

GTR323435

26 posts

4 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
As a multiple gtr owner (32,34 and bayside my2035) wtf 😳

No ones going to spend that, unless you need a tax right off

Ian974

2,349 posts

163 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
I do get the idea of it and that it's being built by a race team suggests that they will know where the limitations of a full on "race car for the road" would need to be adjusted, but I can't help but think you could actually go racing in something pretty serious and get a monster of a road car for a similar overall cost.
Or if you're just going to do track days with it, why not just buy the GT3 race car?
Edit: it seems more like something I'd choose to build in gran turismo or something rather than a car I'd actually want in real life

clacs2

82 posts

123 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
The CD rack under the bumper is very old skool.

McRors

54 posts

20 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
FFS, what is the point? Where in Britain could you drive this thing on public roads to even 50% of its potential? Scottish highlands perhaps? Give me an Alfaholic or Singer Porsche any. Actually give me an Ariel Nomad.

h0b0

5,611 posts

160 months

Wednesday 7th April
quotequote all
leglessAlex said:
I know it's a prototype, I'm sure the driving performance will be exceptional and I'm not sure that I actually can think of any direct competitors off the top of my head, but even so...

...isn't £720k quite a lot for a (heavily) tuned GTR? Does anyone really want a GT3 car for the road?

Yeah, I know, typical PH comment moaning about price and I'm usually of the opinion that these sort of creations are actually reasonably priced for the amount of man hours, but I really can't get past that many hundreds of thousands for what it is.
this being pistonheads the thread would not be complete without someone saying "what about this second hand car?"




I am not even a fan of the Senna but it does compete for road going race car category in this price bracket. In fact, this one came in at over 20% discount.

I do love the GTR but it is one I am grateful other people buy them.