RE: 2022 Nissan Ariya | PH Review

RE: 2022 Nissan Ariya | PH Review

Author
Discussion

Johnnytheboy

24,370 posts

167 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
J4CKO said:
7.5 to sixty used to be decent hot hatch territory.
7.5 used to be obtained with 150 bhp too...

ajap1979

6,150 posts

168 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
Debaser said:
Interesting they chose to go FWD. Is this one of the most powerful FWD BEVs?
Single motor Polestar 2 is also FWD and has 228bhp and 243lb ft.

J4CKO

37,352 posts

181 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
Johnnytheboy said:
J4CKO said:
7.5 to sixty used to be decent hot hatch territory.
7.5 used to be obtained with 150 bhp too...
And 30 to the gallon…

spikyone

1,008 posts

81 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
Don't understand the fawning over the looks in the article. Take the badges off and it could easily be a Vauxhall. Or a Mercedes EQ-something. It's not remotely interesting to look at and I'll join in the chorus of "two bloody tonnes?!" The future's overweight and looks boring.

Maxym

1,565 posts

217 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
‘,.. handles pertly’. Pert means to stick out. Is this a fancy way of saying outstanding? Or does PH need to consult a good dictionary more often?

ajap1979

6,150 posts

168 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
Maxym said:
‘,.. handles pertly’. Pert means to stick out. Is this a fancy way of saying outstanding? Or does PH need to consult a good dictionary more often?
Doesn’t pertly also mean “lively”?

CoolHands

15,854 posts

176 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
Does it sing to you

mikEsprit

789 posts

167 months

Sunday 7th August
quotequote all
spikyone said:
Don't understand the fawning over the looks in the article. Take the badges off and it could easily be a Vauxhall. Or a Mercedes EQ-something. It's not remotely interesting to look at and I'll join in the chorus of "two bloody tonnes?!" The future's overweight and looks boring.
From the front, it's an SUV NSX.

raspy

897 posts

75 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
Just chatted to a Nissan dealer (as I was considering this car a few weeks ago) and he told me;

a) They have not had many orders for the car to date
b) They only have one demonstrator (smallest battery lowest spec) and they are not allowed to sell that for another 12 months
c) No other physical cars in stock, everything has to be factory order
d) Lead time on getting one is minimum of 5-6 months (and that's for lowest spec models with smaller battery)
e) If you want the bigger battery version, it's likely to be 12 month lead time

Clivey

5,008 posts

185 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
lrdisco said:
Ah so you collect scrap cars as a hobby.
*Sees username*

biglaugh

LuS1fer

39,400 posts

226 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
Very Kia-esque.

They all seem to be following a common look, a Mandalorian helmet, kinked middle to disguise the bulk and the full width light spoiler.

Good effort but I'm just not an SUV guy.

SilverCider

4 posts

118 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
raspy said:
EQE/EQS are available to test drive (and buy) right now. EQS is pretty sleek at 0.20 drag coefficient.
Drag coefficient (whilst impressive) is only part of the equation, frontal area is another, and these are all big cars. An SUV type vehicle is never going to win in the drag department I'm afraid.

As other's have rightly pointed out, everything is bloody heavy in the EV world and it's one of the reasons why we're only getting big EVs in the first place. Their size helps to hide the mass of the EV package and allows a larger volume of batteries in order to approach the biblical range figures John Smith wants in order to avoid range anxiety. In addition to this, it also allows manufacturers to make money on them since the SUV market demands a premium.

eein

1,112 posts

246 months

Monday 8th August
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Yet another article about EVs that gets all obsessed with telling us the charging in KW and battery capacity in KWh. When will motoring journalists wake up and realise that alongside range the most useful bit of info is max charging speed expressed in mph - ie how long do I need to wait until I get x miles of range? The vast majority of readers haven't got the faintest clue what battery capacity and charging rates mean.


MDMA .

7,500 posts

82 months

Monday 8th August
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cerb4.5lee said:
I remember when a Nissan was all about affordability, and that was what realy attracted me to the S14 200SX/370Z. You need a few quid to get into an EV now that is for sure. Why are bloody electric cars so expensive?! This model isn't even fast.
You do know the cost to mine lithium/manufacture electric vehicles are huge. Let’s put aside the C02 being even higher than an ICE vehicle too. But it only produces fairy dust when driving smile

ajap1979

6,150 posts

168 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
MDMA . said:
Let’s put aside the C02 being even higher than an ICE vehicle too. But it only produces fairy dust when driving smile
Here we go again getmecoat

raspy

897 posts

75 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
eein said:
Yet another article about EVs that gets all obsessed with telling us the charging in KW and battery capacity in KWh. When will motoring journalists wake up and realise that alongside range the most useful bit of info is max charging speed expressed in mph - ie how long do I need to wait until I get x miles of range? The vast majority of readers haven't got the faintest clue what battery capacity and charging rates mean.
Further to that, how many drivers who have never had an EV before will feel let down because they were not aware that every EV has its own charging curve and that some are better than others in maintaining a high rate of charge?

It's not like they buy a ICE car and have to figure out the rate of flow of the fuel through the hose when they go to the petrol station.

Or that the rate of flow of the fuel through the hose might change depending upon whether you have a quarter tank or a half tank of fuel when you start to refuel or whether the fuel tank in your car is cold.

How many people considering switching are nerds who want to learn all about charging curves, and how to warm up the battery to a suitable level prior to rapid charge or put up with rapid chargers that don't always charge at the rate that is advertised because it just happens to be a slow day at that charging station?

Harry Flashman

17,145 posts

223 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
We have a Leaf. I rented it 18 months ago when we started having to do a nursery run every morning as using a V8TT AMG Merc as our daily, short run car in London was stupid. Expensive, bad for air quality , bad for the car, and just felt wrong.

I will never go back to an ICE car as a town runabout. Thr Leaf is, frankly, aweaome at what it does. Buttons to run on overnight charging in the driveway. Buttons to use in the cockpit too, as opposed to endless screen menus. Is 18C inside when i get into it at 7.30am every weekday, whether it is -5 or +25 outside. Utterly reliable. Swallows buggies and kit for small kids. 90% of our journeys are under 30 miles. It is surprisingly fun to drive too, at least in town. It is also effortless, convenient , and quick enough for the SE's crowded roads

It cannot be our only car as i love a V8, it won't do big trips, and the battery drops alarmingly on the motorway, especially with heating or aircon on.

But it is the best town car I have ever driven. I have grown to love it for its capability.

EVs aren't the answer to every question , but they are the answer to many, for us city dwellers withh access to home charging. And Nissan seem to know what they are doing with the tech, in teems of usability.

J4CKO

37,352 posts

181 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
eein said:
Yet another article about EVs that gets all obsessed with telling us the charging in KW and battery capacity in KWh. When will motoring journalists wake up and realise that alongside range the most useful bit of info is max charging speed expressed in mph - ie how long do I need to wait until I get x miles of range? The vast majority of readers haven't got the faintest clue what battery capacity and charging rates mean.
True, but if you are spending 50 grand you would hope folk would do some research....

Miles of charge per hour would be a useful metric, would need to be a min and a max.

The electric thing is happening, whenever I walk the dog at night there is always something that wafts past making a strange space age noise nowadays.




raspy

897 posts

75 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
J4CKO said:
True, but if you are spending 50 grand you would hope folk would do some research....

Miles of charge per hour would be a useful metric, would need to be a min and a max.

The electric thing is happening, whenever I walk the dog at night there is always something that wafts past making a strange space age noise nowadays.
Many don't do any research, regardless of the cost of the car. I can't tell you how many charging points I've plugged into, only to be approached by someone who has a new EV, bought it purely for financial reasons or whatever the dealer told them, and they don't even know about CCS or even how to open the charge port on their car.

In fact, they didn't even take 5 mins to google the real world range of the car before buying, naively assuming that the range would be the same as advertised, whether they drive at 70mph all day or sit in traffic with the heater on when it's freezing outside, doing lots of 2 mile journeys. Then they complain that EVs are crap and that they feel cheated by the dealer/manufacturer.

Merry

1,060 posts

169 months

Monday 8th August
quotequote all
J4CKO said:
Miles of charge per hour would be a useful metric, would need to be a min and a max.
It would also have to account for the drivers average consumption. So would be woefully inaccurate if they used wtlp figures.

It's really not hard to divide battery capacity by average charge rate.