RE: Shed of the Week | MG ZT-T 160

RE: Shed of the Week | MG ZT-T 160

Author
Discussion

nismo48

1,532 posts

191 months

Friday 18th November
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Al the Mad said:
My kind of shed. Top shedding
+1 thumbup

LucyP

1,339 posts

43 months

Friday 18th November
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The problem with Shed is, he doesn't know whose advice to accept to and whose to reject. Maybe that's because of Mrs Shed?

Shed mentioned the lovers and haters of these cars, and journalists, but he seems to have forgotten who really counts, and that's the market. And this car doesn't seem to be popular with it. The price has been reduced - by 40%! They have reduced the only other MG that they have - a ZS by 25% also. Take that Jeremy Hunt and the Bank of England and all your talk of inflation!

It also hasn't been taxed since the beginning of February, so where has it been all these months? Probate delays perhaps, if we're being kind? Unsold yet again at auction? Or has it been stuck on the forecourt of this dealer?

In their 2019 accounts their stock wasn't even valued at £20K. In 2021 it was valued at over £100K and that was supposed to be a time when dealers had empty forecourts and couldn't find any stock. So either they have put a 0 on the end of all their stock, or have really gone upmarket with the cars they sell (excepting this car) or they had a lot of unsold stock.

Edited by LucyP on Friday 18th November 17:38

2xChevrons

2,183 posts

64 months

Friday 18th November
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FlukePlay said:
With its strange bonnet meets grille alignment/panel gap I dread to think what worst-made Rovers were like.
Late P6s could be truly dire - they were never up to the standards of the P4 and P5 because they were built in quantities, and down to a price, that Rover was not used to working with. None the less the early ones were generally made of good-quality materials but not brilliantly assembled - but still well above the standard of a mass-market saloon of the time. The Series 2s which were made at the height of the industry's collapse, problems with parts suppliers and the destruction of industrial relations and workplace morale were truly terrible:

The AA said:
...reported that a Rover 3500 purchased in 1974 had covered 6,000 miles (9,600 kilometres) during its first six months, during which period it had consumed three engines, two gearboxes, two clutch housings and needed a complete new set of electrical cables. The car had spent 114 of its first 165 days in a workshop.
Early SD1s were equally dire - badly-applied and flaky paint, perennial water leaks, badly fitting windscreens, badly adjusted/hung doors and tailgates, fragile interior plastics, miscoloured and/or misaligned interior trim parts, poor-quality electrical connectors, short-lived gearboxes, self-destructing valve gear on the six-cylinder engines and so on. An innovative and generally sound design let down almost entirely by Eastern Bloc levels of (non) quality control.




molineux1980

1,147 posts

203 months

Friday 18th November
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I really like this, pondering moving on my much loved Swift Sport for something I can chuck the MTB in, and it tickles my fancy.

Rafeabrook

103 posts

113 months

Friday 18th November
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I still have the itch for a ZT-T and already have a Monogram ZR+ for the kids to learn in
This would be a fine thing to hack about in over winter and you should get your money back from someone in the MG community when you come to sell
I imagine this would have been long gone had it been closer to central/southern England

Chunkychucky

5,541 posts

153 months

Friday 18th November
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Rafeabrook said:
I still have the itch for a ZT-T and already have a Monogram ZR+ for the kids to learn in
Good for you? confused


trevalvole

517 posts

17 months

Friday 18th November
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2xChevrons said:
It was probably the best-made Rover, and quite possible the best all-round Rover, since the P5.
I found it interesting that HubNut preferred the 400 and 45 that he's had to his 75. I gather that the 400/45 was originally based on a Honda model and that some of the Honda engineering was still present.

Watcher of the skies

162 posts

21 months

Friday 18th November
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I'm late joining. Has the bunfight started yet?

Wren-went

424 posts

22 months

Friday 18th November
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These are ageing well ,and this compared to a diesel ZT that's for sale with over 200,000 miles this is a good buy the diesel is a private seller wanting £1800 some people are deluded.

As a metrology technician in an ex Rover Foundry who was entitled to discount which with offers on top we could get cars for nearly half price and in 15 years these ZT and 75s were 1 of few cars Rover made anyone bought through staff discount.

Weso60

52 posts

25 months

Friday 18th November
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I am late joining too!, would look so much better with the correct rear numberplate, the curved one.....

FlukePlay

723 posts

129 months

Friday 18th November
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Watcher of the skies said:
I'm late joining. Has the bunfight started yet?
It's all rather civilised so far but get yourself down to Greggs for a dozen and come back later when the crowd have consumed some alcohol punch

LucyP

1,339 posts

43 months

Friday 18th November
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Weso60 said:
I am late joining too!, would look so much better with the correct rear number plate, the curved one.....
They are under £20 for a shaped one. Since the dealer has knocked £1k off the car already, to try and shift it from the forecourt, if all it took for you to buy it was a £20 shaped rear plate, I think that would be on the car faster than you can say MG!

LuS1fer

39,730 posts

229 months

Friday 18th November
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J4CKO said:
They werent exactly "gutless", just not massively fast then, and especially now. My uncle had one from new and it went well enough, my dad and uncle bought a ropey one to trade on and that one wasnt very fast. Sometimes its not all just about numbers and beating a Golf R from the lights. The reviews were very positive as a car, it wasnt a real M5 competitor by any means.

The 260 was meant to be the entry model to the V8 ZT, with varying power outputs up to 500 or so bhp, but as we know that never happened, though there were a couple of pre production 385 ones I think and various supercharged conversions which go well.
Well, the V8s were distinctly underpowered, just as it was in the Mustang that donated it, at a time when the GM F-bodies were thumping out 320hp.

GM must surely have had capacity after they binned the slow-selling F-cars in 2002 and the LS1 was far more compact. The Vauxhall Monaro didn't arrive until 2004.

The modular V8 barely fitted let alone trying the 32v Mustang engine.

Top Gear tested the saloon and did say it had good handling though.

Limpet

5,724 posts

145 months

Friday 18th November
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trevalvole said:
2xChevrons said:
It was probably the best-made Rover, and quite possible the best all-round Rover, since the P5.
I found it interesting that HubNut preferred the 400 and 45 that he's had to his 75. I gather that the 400/45 was originally based on a Honda model and that some of the Honda engineering was still present.
According to my neighbour who has owned 3 75s (each bought new), the rule is the earlier the better where quality is concerned. The early cars launched under BMW’s stewardship were really nicely finished, and very well put together.

As MG Rover became more cash strapped, they started engineering cost out of their cars which became more extreme as time went on. My neighbour said you’d have struggled to recognise his last one as being even from the same manufacturer as the first. All the nice materials were gone, and the car felt flimsy and cheap.

Trebor1970

20 posts

4 months

Friday 18th November
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SimonTheSailor said:
'Fitted with Ford's superb modular 260bhp'

What does that mean - modular ?
Presume it means they bought them in crates already assembled from Ford USA?

LuS1fer

39,730 posts

229 months

Friday 18th November
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Trebor1970 said:
SimonTheSailor said:
'Fitted with Ford's superb modular 260bhp'

What does that mean - modular ?
Presume it means they bought them in crates already assembled from Ford USA?
Modular simply meant Ford could build different types of engine on the same production line.

AlexRS2782

7,492 posts

197 months

Friday 18th November
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Had one of these as a courtesy car for a day, a few years back when i'd dropped my mums ZR in for some work at the MG place i use.

Quite nice to waft around in for the day tbh.

AlexRS2782

7,492 posts

197 months

Friday 18th November
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Chunkychucky said:
Rafeabrook said:
I still have the itch for a ZT-T and already have a Monogram ZR+ for the kids to learn in
Good for you? confused

If you search MG Monogram colours it brings up some examples of the various custom option / order colours that were available for a time. At least one of them was a custom flip type paint from around the same time that TVR and also the modified scene used to favour custom finishes.

Alternatively bit more info here - http://xpower-mg.com/monogram-scheme-personalise-y...

ingenieur

2,143 posts

165 months

Friday 18th November
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I think the ZTs of that era are likely to be the survivors. Possibly the ZRs as well. They still look good today inside and out. Being a Rover 75 at heart isn't helpful to their attractiveness but the 75 is more-or-less 'out of sight, out of mind' by this stage so the MG variants are free to appreciate now.

Same goes for the Mondeo ST.

The V8 version of the MG will live forever.

Having said that... I'm not sure if I would ever want one. (I'd have a v8)

I drove an elderly 75 tourer which was down on its luck, and it was a proper heap... I didn't buy it.

Silver75

834 posts

204 months

Friday 18th November
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trevalvole said:
I found it interesting that HubNut preferred the 400 and 45 that he's had to his 75. I gather that the 400/45 was originally based on a Honda model and that some of the Honda engineering was still present.
I always found HubNut's critique of the 75 weird and appeared to be nothing more than some classic reverse snobbery. As a Rover enthusiast who likes (and has owned) both the 75 and 45, the idea that the 45 is a better car is laughable.

His main critiques of the 75 seemed to be that the BMW diesel engine is too complicated to work on at home and that the Saloon variant isn't as practical as a large hatchback.