Murcielago 6.2?

Murcielago 6.2?

Author
Discussion

sandysinclair

206 posts

172 months

Thursday 22nd April
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Fundamentally the 6.2 is a slightly rougher engine then the later 6.5 but also less stressed as a result , hidden rear chassis corrosion is a problem , you need the uprated 380mm front brakes as the pre 2005 cars have the smaller discs and are pretty rubbish . If you can find one take the manual over the egear as it's an infinitely nicer drive. if you plan on doing proper miles in the thing i.e more than the token 400-500 miles a year most owners drive them, then get that wheelbarrow stocked full of crisp 50s as these can be cataclysmically expensive to run and maintain properly. When they work.... it's an incredible car.

sisu

868 posts

138 months

Friday 23rd April
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Doofus said:
I prefer the look of the early Murcielagos (6.2, LP640) over the later, slashes and hard edges versions.

Is there any reason to avoid the first-gen 6.2? Likewise the manual or e-gear?
Receiving road head is not compromised by the seat belt location in my experience even at motorway speeds.
Other than opening the doors to ask her in I can't think of a better vehicle other than a Phantom or Mulsanne in that respect.


beljames

284 posts

232 months

Saturday 1st May
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I own Sandy’s old car. It’s a late model 6.2 (the ‘coupe update’) and can attest to the cataclysmic running costs, especially if you go through Lamborghini for the servicing. It’s not so much the pure labour cost (which if you buy a super car and main dealer maintain it you should just expect) but the parts costs, which are, really, just stupid - especially as a fair few are cross-referenced across the VAG Group. For example, a headlight? £5k to you sir...
We’ve settled into a routine of using Main Dealer for the mains and a specialist for the interims. The Main Dealer keeps the history up to date. The specialist will do things the Main Dealer will not (eg a door catch failed recently meaning it wouldn’t lock/arm. The Lambo part price was thousands as a complete unit. The specialist managed to replace the failed micro switch at around £5).
It’s a unique car to drive. Hard to describe. Like nothing else - not amazing, not even that quick by modern standards, but it’s an event like no other. If you can afford it, everyone should have one in their life at least once.
Sandy put a load of mileage on our one - it’s over 50k by now and is well maintained. I have to say that all of the faults we’ve had are not mileage related. That engine is very well built.


mrporsche

533 posts

7 months

Saturday 1st May
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I have just driven mine from London to Newcastle.

17mpg - traffic was poor.

I don’t agree with the astronomical running costs. Yes it uses a lot of petrol and any lambo specific part is expensive. Lots of parts are made by others and if you are happy to diy, changing oil is changing oil.

Clutch and valve clearances will be a big job but routine maintenance isn’t hard.

I have removed the starter and alternator to be rebuilt, an evenings work in the garage to get them out and £100 to get rebuilt. I am sure Lamborghini suggest removing the engine for the starter motor.

Using the help of a 13 year old I replaced the cooling pipe to the alternator and front brake ducts .

Whilst it is not a Ford Fiesta, I cant think of many other 17 year old cars I would take to a main dealer for anything.

If you are prepared to try working on it, it’s not that expensive to maintain.


Edited by mrporsche on Saturday 1st May 13:52


Edited by mrporsche on Saturday 1st May 18:59

mrporsche

533 posts

7 months

Saturday 1st May
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Just to add

Rear chassis corrosion is an issue, I assume the heat from the exhaust effects the paint ?

The rear bumper is a handful of bolts all reasonable easy to get at, with the rear wheels off. Any removal of the exhaust will entail cutting the bolts off, but bolts are cheap. A good rub down and painting with an anti rust compound and then a coat of paint will offer protection.

beljames

284 posts

232 months

Don’t disagree with any of the above. In particular if you browse the US forums, there’s an awful lot of DIY maintenance going on. All these things are relative. At the end of a day, even an F1 car is just a selection of materials screwed together in the right order! I do bits of maintenance on my older kit, so why not the Lambo? Firstly, the design really isn’t that conducive to a lot of stuff. You’re right, Lamborghini do recommend the engine comes out for the starter (it’s very possible without as you say) and getting the engine out for the clutch is a sod (it’s a very big job - unlike, say, most Ferrari’s where the engine drops out with relative ease). Secondly, I just don’t have the time to have the car in bits - I’d rather drive it. Thirdly, if you screw something up, it’s potentially a very expensive mistake! And finally, I’ve got half an eye on resale, although you can get a service stamp for a basic oil change and do everything else yourself.
But kudos, if you can do it - then you should! But you’d have to go some way to convince me it’s an easy car to maintain!

mrporsche

533 posts

7 months

Although I wouldn’t rely on it the
“Distance to Empty” reading drops in 10km chunks !


MerciEnFrance

484 posts

73 months

This pretty much says it all....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XRH23RtoPc

It does have down sides I'll admit, like having to take off the LR wheel to get to the battery...