2018 Granturismo, how risky?

2018 Granturismo, how risky?

Author
Discussion

stongle

Original Poster:

5,831 posts

143 months

Sunday 18th September
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After being slightly miffed by BMW on moving my delivery date by 3 months (yesterday) - thinking about binning them off and going for something I've always wanted.

How risky is the Granturismo as a prospect. It needs to do 100 miles a week on school runs (2 days) but otherwise its a penis extension. I'm after the absolute latest I can get for 65k.

Or should i just get a new Levente and live the Italian dream?

BlackR8

395 posts

58 months

Sunday 18th September
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For 65k you should be able get a facelift latest iteration of the Granturismo with the much needed updated Infotainment thats probably no more than 3-4 years old with minimal miles. Lovely looking thing!

Fessia fancier

734 posts

164 months

Sunday 18th September
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It seems a good idea to me although I am not sure whether the evolution rate was such that you may as well get one a bit older for a lot less.
Lovely car. Our QP has hit 130k miles with relatively little trouble (though quite a lot of consumables)

132

466 posts

244 months

Monday 19th September
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I used my 2014 GT for all manner of things (including the school run) and it performed without fault. I would suggest it would take 100/week in its stride.

Pierre2k

31 posts

26 months

Monday 19th September
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Never owned one, so can't really answer the question, but I do love the look of these and have been monitoring them on Autotrader for a while.

I occasionally read posts by some that don't my like the final facelift as much aesthetically, but I quite like the way they angled the front grill and made it a bit more aggressive, whilst keeping the rest of the car as gorgeous as ever. The new infotainment is still pretty dated by modern standards, and isn't quite as well integrated into the dash (looks a bit bolted on), but has apple car play / android auto and does the job. You also have an interior which is broadly the same as the 2013 onwards version.

For me, original version looks great externally, but has a dated looking interior (e.g. old fashioned looking seats). The 2013 onwards has a more modern looking interior, which like, but I absolutely hate the grill with the smile/moustache vents at each side of the main guppy grill. Completely ruins the front for me. The final facelift looks a bit more aggressive, a bit less guppy like, and has the improved interior with reasonably infotainment.

I'd personally go for a 2018+ model, but they still have a long way to fall on depreciation, so go in with your eyes open.

Everything I've read suggests mechanically these are fairly robust. However, factor in:
1) relatively expensive service costs
2) an obvious petrol thirst
3) expensive tyres/pads/discs when the time comes
4) most worrying for me, notorious rusting of the front not subframe.

That last point is the biggest fear for me getting one. Seemingly Maserati stopped making them, and they rust right through. Seen some shockers online. Personally, I live in Scotland (lots of rain), and it wouldn't be kept in a garage (garage too small), so it really concerns me. Be tempted to take it to Sports Maserati for treatment, but that's the other end of the country for me.

vanman1936

626 posts

200 months

Monday 19th September
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They are interesting cars to own, generally very reliable and not insanely expensive to service BUT brake discs and suspension on the 4.7 is eye watering.

omniflow

2,167 posts

132 months

Monday 19th September
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The infotainment can easily be brought up to date with a Naviplus system. It's a transparent overlay, so the car looks totally factory, until you want to use Spotify or Android Auto.

Disks and pads are only extortionate if you buy genuine Maserati - there are better alternatives from 3rd parties that are significantly cheaper - and in this case better doesn't just mean cheaper - it means a superior product that also costs less.

Not sure if £65k would get you a Stradale, but it would definitely get you a Gran Cabrio MC.

In my view, going for a 2018 car will expose you to more depreciation. Getting an older car, that's more desirable, and spending around £900 to bring the Infotainment up to date is the "safest" option.

pancholi

168 posts

138 months

Tuesday 20th September
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for all things Maserati in the UK go to sportsmaserati forum.
full of info...
including the issue with front subframe rot.
yes, some can have issues with corrosion, but this is very easy to identify during inspection.
most of the later ones, can easily and cheaply be rust guarded and future proofed.

Soleith

237 posts

70 months

Tuesday 20th September
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Wonderful cars, had a 2016 from new for a couple of years and drove as a daily with only one issue when battery died. Not going to be super cheap to maintain but also not ridiculous (i guess budget a grand a year perhaps?)

Personally I'd forego the updated infotainment and get the non-facelifted model as it looked terrible imo.

Also, Levante not comparable, I've had one as a loaner several times and don't like it at all.

fflump

744 posts

19 months

Wednesday 21st September
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stongle said:
After being slightly miffed by BMW on moving my delivery date by 3 months (yesterday) - thinking about binning them off and going for something I've always wanted.

How risky is the Granturismo as a prospect. It needs to do 100 miles a week on school runs (2 days) but otherwise its a penis extension. I'm after the absolute latest I can get for 65k.

Or should i just get a new Levente and live the Italian dream?
It's not a risky proposition, even less so if you get used approved under warranty.

Trouble is the guaranteed costs not the unknowns- a £65k model will probably drop around £15k in 2 years.

The Levante's looks have grown on me but at that price point a Stelvio QF is a better proposition.


Murph7355

34,255 posts

237 months

Wednesday 21st September
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GT's are good cars, but not great. They have more road presence than most other cars made. And sound very good.

If your driving is mainly A-roads then it's a better prospect. But they're big cars, and feel it.

As mentioned above, some consumables are expensive. Depreciation will still be a thing too.

Space in the rear is ample (as is the boot), but ingress/egress can be awkward for the non-child like, and you'll age several years waiting for the electric seats to move out of the way. The door are also very big - care needed in a cramped Waitrose car park.

All that said, there isn't a BMW I would have in place of one smile


Murph7355

34,255 posts

237 months

Thursday 22nd September
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btw, I could always picture you in one of these stongle:

https://www.pistonheads.com/buy/listing/13367780

Or maybe

https://www.pistonheads.com/buy/listing/12431211

Or staying classy

https://www.pistonheads.com/buy/listing/12698959

You could post pictures of yourself in it on NP&E to give a few of the regulars an embolism, throw tins of beans at peasants and generally waft around biggrin

fflump

744 posts

19 months

Thursday 22nd September
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Murph7355 said:
GT's are good cars, but not great. They have more road presence than most other cars made. And sound very good.

If your driving is mainly A-roads then it's a better prospect. But they're big cars, and feel it.

As mentioned above, some consumables are expensive. Depreciation will still be a thing too.

Space in the rear is ample (as is the boot), but ingress/egress can be awkward for the non-child like, and you'll age several years waiting for the electric seats to move out of the way. The door are also very big - care needed in a cramped Waitrose car park.

All that said, there isn't a BMW I would have in place of one smile
Also the 2018 version is not substantially better than the 2013 version which start in the low £30k's

Murph7355

34,255 posts

237 months

Thursday 22nd September
quotequote all
fflump said:
Also the 2018 version is not substantially better than the 2013 version which start in the low £30k's
I actually prefer the look of the 2013.

Another thing stongle - look carefully at the options on a car.

Low spec ones can feel a bit cheap inside IMO. Mine had a load of alcantara and carbon - not to everyone's taste, but it was well executed IMO and looked and felt great.

Sadly it wasn't meant for the sort of roads I drive, and wouldn't go up/down the main access to my house. So it ended up not getting used as much as it deserved and was sold. Replaced it with a 911. Objectively a much better car. Subjectively less so.

ITP

1,682 posts

178 months

Saturday
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BlackR8 said:
For 65k you should be able get a facelift latest iteration of the Granturismo with the much needed updated Infotainment thats probably no more than 3-4 years old with minimal miles. Lovely looking thing!
Infotainment is the least important thing in a granturismo. It wouldn’t bother me a bit if my quattroporte didn’t even have infotainment.
For £65k get a stradale.

NarrinRad

151 posts

156 months

I’ve had 2 GT’s including a Stradale and 2 Levante’s ( Diesel & Petrol - much prefer petrol version )

Both will do the job very easily, lots of independents to do the servicing and I’ve found both to be bullet proof.

The Levante is obviously more up to date and I find it very nimble and extremely comfortable.

Can’t tell you mpg as I’ve never bought a car based on that and I never look at it - drive them both and then choose.

Sport Maserati . Com is much better than pistonheads for info on the brand.