570S break in period?

570S break in period?

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Discussion

koorby

Original Poster:

175 posts

104 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
We're planning a long-ish road trip from the south of England to Heidelberg Germany (500 miles), and then another 500 miles to Spielberg Austria. This is literally the day after I collect my brand-new 570S.

Question: will doing 1,000 miles mostly on motorways over two days immediately after taking delivery be detrimental to the car?

dmitsi

3,583 posts

178 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
Each engine is run through a break in before being sent to mclaren. You can just enjoy it.

RamboLambo

4,843 posts

128 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
Best to vary the speed and braking for the first 600 miles but I wouldn't be overly concerned TBH.

I've ragged some of my company cars from day 1 without worrying about a breaking in regime and they have turned out to be the better cars on both speed and mpg

dmitsi

3,583 posts

178 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
Obviously respect turbo warming and cooling periods though!

br d

7,605 posts

184 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
McLaren themselves recommend 900 miles of sensible stuff, varied driving and don't wring it's neck.
On these threads somebody always says the engine is pre-run in on a bench so just go for it but there are many other mechanical systems in the car that prefer a period of bedding in.

Ultimately it's up to you, car certainly won't break if you push on but any time I get a new car I like that feeling of knowing it was eased in, one less variable.

Edited by br d on Saturday 22 April 16:33

Yipper

5,964 posts

48 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
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It's under warranty. Just redline it everywhere.

dmitsi

3,583 posts

178 months

Saturday 22nd April 2017
quotequote all
The break in period on the development engines came down from 4 hours to 20 minutes. After which the engines were often sitting at peak power for most of the day or running very lengthy durability cycles.
Ultimately it can be ragged and enjoyed, is not like you're going to drive all that way without pushing it . It would be rare for something to go wrong and if it did it would more than likely happen however you drove it.

koorby

Original Poster:

175 posts

104 months

Sunday 23rd April 2017
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Thanks chaps, useful answers!

hornbaek

3,309 posts

193 months

Sunday 23rd April 2017
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Its is probably the best you can do to a new car (if you vary it a little bit) rather than spending 3 months in London trying to get the first 1000 miles in. I have always tried to take my cars on a European trip straigth out of the box (or optioned for factory delivery with Porsche in Stuttgart ) and i always found the cars much more responsive and well running because of that.

AyBee

9,178 posts

160 months

Monday 24th April 2017
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Take a detour and use smaller roads surely has to be the sensible option wink

cjm

468 posts

226 months

Monday 24th April 2017
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Sitting at a constant speed and load won't be good for a new engine either.

vincep99

3 posts

9 months

Saturday 25th January
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Do you have to change the oil after the 1,000 mile break-in period?

Superleg48

1,020 posts

91 months

Saturday 25th January
quotequote all
vincep99 said:
Do you have to change the oil after the 1,000 mile break-in period?
Irrespective of whether you have to or not based on manufacturer guidelines, it is always good practise to do so.

Matty3

705 posts

42 months

Sunday 26th January
quotequote all
Superleg48 said:
vincep99 said:
Do you have to change the oil after the 1,000 mile break-in period?
Irrespective of whether you have to or not based on manufacturer guidelines, it is always good practise to do so.
No - you don't but would be recommended at 10k miles or 2nd year service

I didn't have the oil changed at my first annual service, 4k miles on the clock

vincep99

3 posts

9 months

Wednesday 12th February
quotequote all
Thanks again for all the answers.

I always wondered why it is recommended on every new car that you vary the speed? The pistons are anyway going their full stroke up and down, so they won't wear in any given spot. Maybe the transmission, so the gears all get equal polishing of the machining marks?

I am not doubting the advice, just wondering. I also would like to break my 570S in on a 500-mile trip on an interstate

speedick

116 posts

195 months

Friday 14th February
quotequote all
Running in engines ....... generally,

Do

Warm them properly
Try to avoid regular "5 miles to the shops" trips
Drive at varied RPM / Loads (see below though)
Respect the (reduced) redline RPM limits
Check all fluids more often for the 1st 500 miles (including for oil in the water / water in oil)
Check the oil levels regularly (note rates of change & predict requirements)
Make sure the first service gets done on time

Dont (probably more importantly than the "do"'s)

Work them when cold
Drive under high load in high gears
Exceed max RPM limits
Operate at "steady state" for extended periods
Use anything other than reccommended lubes (eg using fully synth instead of (reccomended) mineral oil)

The most common running in mistake is thinking that using low RPM and high gears will somehow give a better result. One of the key objectives of the running in process is to bed the piston rings and bores in against each other. Done properly this will result in good compression and low oil consumption. Done badly the opposite may result (along with glazed bores and / or other damage)

RPM and load are varied because this varies piston / bore pressures in different parts of the cylinder. Fully synth oils are often avoided as they are too good at lubrication and the desired "wearing together" of rings / piston / bores is reduced / stopped.

Another rule of thumb is that the more modern the engine the less sensitive it will be to how it gets run it. For instance a Lycoming (1950's design) aero engine can be ruined if run in badly. I'd guess a Mclaren would be very much less sensitive.




Edited by speedick on Friday 14th February 09:13

Fishlegs

1,831 posts

97 months

Friday 14th February
quotequote all
1000 miles, or 3 years, whichever comes first.

dsl2

1,284 posts

159 months

Friday 14th February
quotequote all
Speedicks is spot on.


TB993tt

1,863 posts

199 months

Friday 14th February
quotequote all
speedick said:
Running in engines ....... generally,

Do

Warm them properly
Try to avoid regular "5 miles to the shops" trips
Drive at varied RPM / Loads (see below though)
Respect the (reduced) redline RPM limits
Check all fluids more often for the 1st 500 miles (including for oil in the water / water in oil)
Check the oil levels regularly (note rates of change & predict requirements)
Make sure the first service gets done on time

Dont (probably more importantly than the "do"'s)

Work them when cold
Drive under high load in high gears
Exceed max RPM limits
Operate at "steady state" for extended periods
Use anything other than reccommended lubes (eg using fully synth instead of (reccomended) mineral oil)

The most common running in mistake is thinking that using low RPM and high gears will somehow give a better result. One of the key objectives of the running in process is to bed the piston rings and bores in against each other. Done properly this will result in good compression and low oil consumption. Done badly the opposite may result (along with glazed bores and / or other damage)

RPM and load are varied because this varies piston / bore pressures in different parts of the cylinder. Fully synth oils are often avoided as they are too good at lubrication and the desired "wearing together" of rings / piston / bores is reduced / stopped.

Another rule of thumb is that the more modern the engine the less sensitive it will be to how it gets run it. For instance a Lycoming (1950's design) aero engine can be ruined if run in badly. I'd guess a Mclaren would be very much less sensitive.




Edited by speedick on Friday 14th February 09:13
Non of the above needed Ricardo run all Mclaren engines up to full power for 20 minutes on engine dyno so pick up your new Mac, get to operating temp and let rip cool

MAC 720S

1,175 posts

105 months

Friday 14th February
quotequote all
570S Owners Manual - Page 2.42