360 Modena values

360 Modena values

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Discussion

kingstanding

Original Poster:

43 posts

111 months

Tuesday 6th April
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Hi again. My previous post was deleted because it contravened posting rules. In my defence I was just seeking views on the value of my car within the scope of 360 values generally. So in that regard let's keep it general. As it's normal for the market for Ferraris and 360's more specifically to go up and down over the years any views on future values given that we're gradually moving towards hybrid/electricvehicles in general. So, is it likely that values will fall as a result or actually increase because such purely fossil fuel vehicles will be representaive of a period in time that we shall not see again?

Roof down

289 posts

90 months

Tuesday 6th April
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I think they will become worthless, this new generation are not interested in the cars us older folks like.
My grandchildren constantly talk about Tesla’s and Elon Musk.
They were never particularly interested in my 360 spider, same with my Boxster.
Fuel will become very expensive to refine in smaller quantities, and as 80% is tax anyway it’ll make no difference.
Mike

Ferruccio

1,503 posts

83 months

Wednesday 7th April
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Roof down said:
I think they will become worthless, this new generation are not interested in the cars us older folks like.
My grandchildren constantly talk about Tesla’s and Elon Musk.
They were never particularly interested in my 360 spider, same with my Boxster.
Fuel will become very expensive to refine in smaller quantities, and as 80% is tax anyway it’ll make no difference.
Mike
My older son, 21, would love nothing more than a 1930s Bentley.

pauloroberto

188 posts

115 months

Monday 12th April
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I don’t think many people will be weighing up a new (or newish) electric or hybrid against a 20 year old Ferrari, especially since many of the former will be company cars. If anything, as new cars become more sterile, I think there could be more interest in classics or modern classics.


Superleg48

1,269 posts

97 months

Monday 12th April
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You may find this of some use....then again, maybe not...

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/174684054646

Who knows...and does it really matter? Enjoy the car, drive it.

Castrol for a knave

2,004 posts

55 months

Monday 12th April
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For the same reason craft gin and beer, steel bikes, artisan coffee, stuff made from brass and man buns exist, there will be younger generations interested in classic cars.


MrVert

3,679 posts

203 months

Tuesday 13th April
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Today's 25 year olds interested in Tesla etc will in 20 years time will be prime fodder for classic cars I reckon.

They'll (hopefully) be in a position to buy something for a weekend toy and if the only new options are electric / hydrogen options, ICE cars of the last 20 years or so will definitely be the more exciting option.

As impressive as the new generation electric cars are, they are no match for enjoyment, or excitement as a Flat 6, V8, V10 or V12 engined car.

Even small 4 pots such as Caterham 7's & Elise's will be in demand, more affordable, not so in your face, probably more socially acceptable...

Unless the Govt. at the time tax them off the road of course...

FezSpider

764 posts

196 months

Tuesday 13th April
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My own sons who are 26 & 27 are into and own supercars and bikes. Always have. One son has bought a gallardo that he is rebuilding him self. Both have jobs in the technology industry, one son works on the touch screen systems for an EV manufacturer. When my 18 year old daughter choose her first car, she had no interest in EVs.
Like my self my sons are also both into watches, even though they both have apple and android watches, there pride and Joy's are there mechanical Breitlings and Tag Heuers.
When the quartz watch was manufactured in the 80s, every one thought that was the end of mechanical watches. These days the quartz watches are way more accurate and capable than mechanical, and yet can be bought for a few quid. Were as the old mechanical watches are worth thousands if not tens of thousands.
I can see EVs will be worthless in very short order as the technology will be out dated so fast. I think maybe people will miss the visceral experience of an special exiting mechanical manual car like the 360 modena. This is just my opinion anyway.

mwstewart

6,045 posts

152 months

Tuesday 13th April
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I see a peak followed by a progressive decline save for a select few cars. I expect a lot of our interesting cars will leave for emerging/developing world countries. Thailand for example has a burgeoning car scene.

Forget the value of these things - buy to enjoy and and write off the money invested.

355fiorano

402 posts

206 months

Tuesday 13th April
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I don't know about value but the trajectory for fossil fuel powered machinery is to eliminate it or the planet is toast. That is irrespective if you believe this to be a true phenomenon or not. The wheels are in motion globally to try and eliminate it.
It may take a while but at some point, based on the above, we will not be able to drive ICE cars. Does that make them worthless or does that make them the new bling like jewelry or antique pieces or art ... who knows. Maybe we are already seeing the start of that, with so many buying these fantastic machines and not driving them in order to preserve them in as new condition.
I for one am hoping to drive my cars as much as I can and at some point, when I can no longer drive them due to age or restrictions, sell them. I would hope they have some decent value ... but I'm not betting on it.

blueg33

26,116 posts

188 months

Wednesday 14th April
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The only thing we know about future values is that we don’t know.

I started my path to Ferrari ownership when I sold a car for 3x what I paid. I couldn’t have predicted that despite their being little interest here, someone from Germany would be keen to buy it.

I think people will start to realise the environmental impact of battery e,v’s and they will die out maybe hydrogen fuel cells replacing them. I do think that ICE cars will become the exception and therefore the environmental risk is less.

Will this mean there is s market with enough demand to hold it increase values. Who knows.

The 360 is a great car. Buy one, use it, enjoy it. If it grows in value that’s a bonus.

I also think that if you are going to use it, buy a cheaper one. Cars are generally more reliable when used than when doing nothing.

MDL111

5,305 posts

141 months

Wednesday 14th April
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I think truly rare and special cars will have a place and quite possibly increase further in value, but the majority of cars will become worth very little / possibly even unsellable. Cars are imo not really comparable to watches as they are quite a bit bigger, have high(ish) running costs and are less suitable to show off to your friends at a dinner party etc.
Maybe a comparison with horses might work - plenty of people still own horses and lots of money is being spent on them / some are bought for millions, plus they get together at prestigious horse events - does that mean my lovely, but no special bloodline Haflinger has any value - not really and the majority of the population cannot afford to keep a horse / has not particular interest in buying a house with a large garden to keep a horse that they can't really ride in the middle of their neighborhood anyway.
In summary - enjoy the car, but don't bet on its value remaining stable for the next 10 years and mentally allocate it to your pension [unless you own a beautiful and rare car from a major brand]

Edit to add - and obviously there are plenty of not-rich people who own horses, those will be the equivalent of your car enthusiast - a dying breed that won't be large enough to support the market for millions of old Porsches, Ferraris, Lamborghinis, McLarens etc etc

Roof down

289 posts

90 months

Wednesday 14th April
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Dying breed! Spot on , sums up as older owners, as with my model steam trains, the old school are passing on quickly.
Sad but fact of life.
Mike

cgt2

1,751 posts

152 months

Wednesday 14th April
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What has surprised me over the past couple of years is that several friends who are by no means tree hugging types and enjoy cars have all switched to electric. Teslas, i8's and Taycans, and they are all pleased about their purchases. It could be a sign of the times when people I consider car enthusiasts are doing that and pleased about the move.

MDL111

5,305 posts

141 months

Wednesday 14th April
quotequote all
cgt2 said:
What has surprised me over the past couple of years is that several friends who are by no means tree hugging types and enjoy cars have all switched to electric. Teslas, i8's and Taycans, and they are all pleased about their purchases. It could be a sign of the times when people I consider car enthusiasts are doing that and pleased about the move.
I try to limit my environmental impact and have certainly started to focus on this more over the last few years - among other things for instance, I am relatively unlikely to ever order a new car due to the overall resource impact (be that petrol or electric for that matter) - just don't see the need when I can buy used cars and they are certainly not scrap after a few years.

So I can certainly understand that people focus more on it and I believe it will have a big impact on demand for the types of cars we like as a car has quite a prominent/visible signaling effect.... even if you do not really care, you probably still do not want to be seen as the negative outlier on a regular basis (a bit like smoking in the US)

Bo_apex

1,349 posts

182 months

Wednesday 14th April
quotequote all
MDL111 said:
I try to limit my environmental impact and have certainly started to focus on this more over the last few years - among other things for instance, I am relatively unlikely to ever order a new car due to the overall resource impact (be that petrol or electric for that matter) - just don't see the need when I can buy used cars and they are certainly not scrap after a few years.

So I can certainly understand that people focus more on it and I believe it will have a big impact on demand for the types of cars we like as a car has quite a prominent/visible signaling effect.... even if you do not really care, you probably still do not want to be seen as the negative outlier on a regular basis (a bit like smoking in the US)
Many youngens will always want to stand out, stick their middle fingers up to government and the system.


HardtopManual

1,573 posts

130 months

Wednesday 14th April
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Roof down said:
I think they will become worthless, this new generation are not interested in the cars us older folks like.
My grandchildren constantly talk about Tesla’s and Elon Musk.
They were never particularly interested in my 360 spider, same with my Boxster.
Yes but in the days of the Escort Cossie and Golf VR6, I was never interested in the Ferrari 288 or Dino, nor the Porsche 959 or any number of 20 year old 911s. I'd love to have all of them now. Tastes change as we get older.

Edited by HardtopManual on Wednesday 14th April 10:52

MDL111

5,305 posts

141 months

Wednesday 14th April
quotequote all
Bo_apex said:
MDL111 said:
I try to limit my environmental impact and have certainly started to focus on this more over the last few years - among other things for instance, I am relatively unlikely to ever order a new car due to the overall resource impact (be that petrol or electric for that matter) - just don't see the need when I can buy used cars and they are certainly not scrap after a few years.

So I can certainly understand that people focus more on it and I believe it will have a big impact on demand for the types of cars we like as a car has quite a prominent/visible signaling effect.... even if you do not really care, you probably still do not want to be seen as the negative outlier on a regular basis (a bit like smoking in the US)
Many youngens will always want to stand out, stick their middle fingers up to government and the system.
fully agree, but that'll quite possibly not support the market that we have today [although taking my smoking example, the tobacco companies don't seem to be doing so badly].

drcarrera

675 posts

189 months

Wednesday 14th April
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I think "petrol" will be around for a long time yet but will eventually become 100% biofuel, thus mitigating much (but not all) of the environmental impact.
We'll still be able to drive our ICE cars many decades from now but the cost of fuelling them will go up considerably and they'll be used sparingly as a result.
I would expect desirable, interesting cars like 360s to maintain their popularity and always be valued quite highly by enthusiasts but I guess a lot depends on how many of those enthusiasts there still are!



Edited by drcarrera on Wednesday 14th April 11:01

MDL111

5,305 posts

141 months

Wednesday 14th April
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I'd actually be quite happy if this proves to be correct. If I can buy cars for say 15% of today's value, I'd quite happily do so. If in exchange I have to pay 10 Euros a litre for my petrol and a fortune to insure my not-semi-autonomous vehicles for a few thousand miles each a year on country roads [am sure I won't be allowed into a city], so be it - I'd gladly pay for that and not worry one moment if I will ever be able to sell the cars again