Track Car Options

Track Car Options

Author
Discussion

Hol

6,231 posts

167 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
I ran road going JDM STI Impreza's with decent coilovers and other mods as daily/track cars from 2001 to 2009. The later one being a Blobeye STI Twin Scroll with 400bhp.
They were great but heavy, hard on tyres and brakes and I went through a few wheel bearings.

After moving on, I initially went for a 182 Clio cup (my wife's old car, that was only 5yo at the time) which was great, and I currently have an R26 that I bought for going to/from the train station, which was also used as a temp track car twice and that was very-very good.

Major second hand parts for the Megane 225/R26/Cup are relatively cheap at present and should stay so, for the next 7 years or so, before things like LSD gearboxes, Engines, and wheels will start to become rarer, so now is a good time to run one cost wise,

Parts like cages and relatively cheap and available at present, if you were going for a lightweight R26r clone.


Edited by Hol on Monday 14th June 09:47

Far Cough

1,604 posts

135 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
Mr_D said:
You have my attention, I'll make some enquiries into this, thanks!
I ran a Caterham R400D for 2 years and I am 6`3. Mine was the wider body but plenty of room. Road legal and still enough room with the roof up for when it was chucking it down. Road legal and peanuts to run. Not much could stick with it on a dry trackday but you have to be committed else its not for you !!!

Other than that , probably the most popular car on trackday is the BMW 3 series in all its various guises. Been a round for ages , loads of spare parts , aftermarket parts and bolt on goodies. A stripped out ( but road legal ) M3 with a few bits on is a potent toy on track.

Mr_D

Original Poster:

20 posts

68 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
Hol said:
I ran road going JDM STI Impreza's with decent coilovers and other mods as daily/track cars from 2001 to 2009. The later one being a Blobeye STI Twin Scroll with 400bhp.
They were great but heavy, hard on tyres and brakes and I went through a few wheel bearings.

After moving on, I initially went for a 182 Clio cup (my wife's old car, that was only 5yo at the time) which was great, and I currently have an R26 that I bought for going to/from the train station, which was also used as a temp track car twice and that was very-very good.

Major second hand parts for the Megane 225/R26/Cup are relatively cheap at present and should stay so, for the next 7 years or so, before things like LSD gearboxes, Engines, and wheels will start to become rarer, so now is a good time to run one cost wise,

Parts like cages and relatively cheap and available at present, if you were going for a lightweight R26r clone.


Edited by Hol on Monday 14th June 09:47
Thanks, I've had 3 x 250's, so I am a bit of a Renaultsport fan. R26 does make sense for the money.

Mr_D

Original Poster:

20 posts

68 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
Far Cough said:
I ran a Caterham R400D for 2 years and I am 6`3. Mine was the wider body but plenty of room. Road legal and still enough room with the roof up for when it was chucking it down. Road legal and peanuts to run. Not much could stick with it on a dry trackday but you have to be committed else its not for you !!!

Other than that , probably the most popular car on trackday is the BMW 3 series in all its various guises. Been a round for ages , loads of spare parts , aftermarket parts and bolt on goodies. A stripped out ( but road legal ) M3 with a few bits on is a potent toy on track.
Good to know, always just write off open wheel stuff.

M3 at this budget will be a money pit I imagine.

Hol

6,231 posts

167 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
Mr_D said:
Far Cough said:
I ran a Caterham R400D for 2 years and I am 6`3. Mine was the wider body but plenty of room. Road legal and still enough room with the roof up for when it was chucking it down. Road legal and peanuts to run. Not much could stick with it on a dry trackday but you have to be committed else its not for you !!!

Other than that , probably the most popular car on trackday is the BMW 3 series in all its various guises. Been a round for ages , loads of spare parts , aftermarket parts and bolt on goodies. A stripped out ( but road legal ) M3 with a few bits on is a potent toy on track.
Good to know, always just write off open wheel stuff.

M3 at this budget will be a money pit I imagine.
He makes a good point though. If you aren't doing a lot of winter days, a Seven-esque kit car IS a good shout as storing them is easy due to their size. Mine was still miserable in the cold rain though, even with a wet karting suit.

Make sure you have enough leg room, not to ride the clutch though, im only 6'1 and I need to fit a floor mounted pedal box, to change gear quickly without physical lifting my left ar$e cheek off the seat to do it.
Failing that a bike engine one, as you can sequentially change up/down.


HustleRussell

19,653 posts

127 months

Monday 14th June
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What chassis is that, Hol?

Ash_

5,167 posts

157 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
A bit left field to what others are suggesting, but; 350Z?
https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202106023...

Rotary Potato

78 posts

63 months

Monday 14th June
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Mazda RX8?

That budget would either buy you a sorted track car (and several grand in the kitty to go out and actually enjoy it) or a blank canvas shell, an engine rebuild and your choice of mods.

I tracked a largely standard PZ model and found the handling sweet, the engine linear, and it surprisingly quicker than you might expect on paper.

The biggest drawback for me was the amount of petrol they go through!

They are also particular to maintenance and being used correctly - fortunately for a track car, that usage involves frequent trips to the 9k redline once the engine is properly up to temperature! smile

Hol

6,231 posts

167 months

Monday 14th June
quotequote all
HustleRussell said:
What chassis is that, Hol?
Mine was a Tiger Super Six with a modded Zetec.

Not the best chassis option to be fair, with the solid rear axle, but I went back to a tin top after one wet winter. The Tiger went off to be a hill climber.


TheAlastair34

324 posts

95 months

Tuesday 15th June
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Spend a little more and buy a vx220

a NA one will lap up tracks no bother and are going up in value

Mr_D

Original Poster:

20 posts

68 months

Tuesday 15th June
quotequote all
TheAlastair34 said:
Spend a little more and buy a vx220

a NA one will lap up tracks no bother and are going up in value
Knew someone with a 2.0T VX220 and they loved it, hugely competent. Sadly looking a bit above budget.

HustleRussell

19,653 posts

127 months

Tuesday 15th June
quotequote all
Hol said:
Mine was a Tiger Super Six with a modded Zetec.

Not the best chassis option to be fair, with the solid rear axle, but I went back to a tin top after one wet winter. The Tiger went off to be a hill climber.
It would be interesting to know how the various chassis compare. That particular Tiger must be on the shorter side.

Hol

6,231 posts

167 months

Wednesday 16th June
quotequote all
HustleRussell said:
Hol said:
Mine was a Tiger Super Six with a modded Zetec.

Not the best chassis option to be fair, with the solid rear axle, but I went back to a tin top after one wet winter. The Tiger went off to be a hill climber.
It would be interesting to know how the various chassis compare. That particular Tiger must be on the shorter side.
I think all Tigers favour short legs and probably use the same dimensions of a WW2 Spitfire pilot, for their design. mine wasn't the lightest either, being a 2001 build, but they do do lighter ones..
I did consider extending the footwells, but by that point, I was looking at tin tops again.

As you suggest a Tiger is not a Westfield, Caterham, MMR, or any of the others out there which may have a longer leg room so you can actually rest your clutch foot somewhere.


TheAlastair34

324 posts

95 months

Wednesday 16th June
quotequote all
Mr_D said:
Knew someone with a 2.0T VX220 and they loved it, hugely competent. Sadly looking a bit above budget.
you will get one for sub 10K and they are going up in value and very unlikly to throw in large bills

And you can use them alot more then a kit car, i know ive got both and very rare i would take the seven out over a vx or elise

GreatGranny

7,970 posts

193 months

Wednesday 16th June
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1781cc

383 posts

61 months

Thursday 17th June
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Olivera said:
Anyone buying a Mk1 TT as a track car needs their head examined, it makes no sense starting with a stodgy mess of a chassis. I would far rather go RWD (e.g. 328i) or FWD (e.g. Clio 172 or Type R).
Open invitation for you, keep an eye on the track page, if you are around on any of the days I am tracking pop along for a passenger ride and see how you feel after. I'd love the chance to prove you wrong and if I don't fair enough but most people who come along for a ride are usually surprised at how well they handle once you awaken the chassis with some proper mods, including instructors during tuition on track days.

Toed64

299 posts

87 months

Thursday 17th June
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For £7000, there are very few (if any) modified road cars that can keep up with even a relatively basic specification lightweight kit. Even MEV Exocets that weigh in at 600 to 700kg are quite a bit quicker on short tracks, than most of the tin tops listed above. The Excocet has a huge cockpit, into which you'd have no trouble fitting.

Watch this for inspiration:

https://youtu.be/a3gW9o1bU5g

Strikers are much cheaper than Caterhams and Westies, but you might have to wait until Winter to get a good one in your budget. £7000 doesn't buy a good Caterham and you'd probably only find a ratty pinto engined Westie for that money.

Trackdayer

697 posts

8 months

Friday 18th June
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My issue with twin seaters in general is that they're very rarely fast. On paper of course they are great. Light and stiff.

But in reality, most of them do little more than hold up Meganes, M3's and any other averagely quick track car. So given that they're awful on the road and you're constantly exposed to the elements, what's the point? Cheap on consumables granted. But that's not a reason IMHO to be slow on a trackday.

HustleRussell

19,653 posts

127 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
Trackdayer said:
My issue with twin seaters in general is that they're very rarely fast. On paper of course they are great. Light and stiff.

But in reality, most of them do little more than hold up Meganes, M3's and any other averagely quick track car. So given that they're awful on the road and you're constantly exposed to the elements, what's the point? Cheap on consumables granted. But that's not a reason IMHO to be slow on a trackday.
Ay? Twin seaters ‘rarely fast’? What an odd thing to say.

Edited by HustleRussell on Friday 18th June 09:20

Trackdayer

697 posts

8 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
HustleRussell said:
Ay? Twin seaters ‘rarely fast’? What an odd thing to say.

Edited by HustleRussell on Friday 18th June 09:20
Not an odd thing at all. That's based on years of doing several trackdays a month.

Aside from Radicals they are seldom quick, in my experience they just seem to hold up the faster cars on track.