Corvette C8 or R8 V10 ?

Corvette C8 or R8 V10 ?

Author
Discussion

Trev450

5,804 posts

120 months

Saturday 30th November
quotequote all
The issue here is that the auto boxes in the likes of the 360 are old tech now and if you've become accustomed to modern versions such as the PDK, DSG, etc, then they are going to feel even more outdated. Whereas a manual box is, erm, a manual box.

blueg33

22,135 posts

172 months

Saturday 30th November
quotequote all
Trev450 said:
The issue here is that the auto boxes in the likes of the 360 are old tech now and if you've become accustomed to modern versions such as the PDK, DSG, etc, then they are going to feel even more outdated. Whereas a manual box is, erm, a manual box.
They were horrid when they were new too! Parallel parking on any sort of an incline is accompanied by lovely smell of burning clutch. Like you say the Maserati version, the Aston version the Fiat/Alfa selespeed, all pretty nasty



Pvapour

8,376 posts

201 months

Saturday 30th November
quotequote all
blueg33 said:
Trev450 said:
The issue here is that the auto boxes in the likes of the 360 are old tech now and if you've become accustomed to modern versions such as the PDK, DSG, etc, then they are going to feel even more outdated. Whereas a manual box is, erm, a manual box.
They were horrid when they were new too! Parallel parking on any sort of an incline is accompanied by lovely smell of burning clutch. Like you say the Maserati version, the Aston version the Fiat/Alfa selespeed, all pretty nasty
Yep, all slated in the day, even worse now you can see what is possible, they gave the Maserati one a name ‘cambiocorsa’ which sounded nice at least hehe

They were better when pressing on but trying to drive smoothly or not be sick in traffic was difficultbiggrin

ZeroGroundZero

Original Poster:

54 posts

2 months

Monday 2nd December
quotequote all
I think this next question from me is more for a finance thread, but say if you comfortably had the money in the bank, is it generally 'better', 'safer', more financially sound...to buy a £50k car outright, or to finance it over a few years?


I know for a NEW car purchase whereby depreciation over the first few years is severe, the answer would always be to lease the car, then hand it back.

But for 2nd hand cars which have seen the bulk of depreciation, is there an obvious winner over buying the car outright in one transaction, or to buy the car by form of certain percentage deposit and the rest being a loan/finance term repayment?



Trev450

5,804 posts

120 months

Monday 2nd December
quotequote all
For me its all about ROI. If the return I'm getting on my investments is greater than the cost of borrowing the funds, then clearly the loan route is the obvious choice. If the money borrowed exceeds the ROI you're getting on your own funds and you can afford to spend it, then that has to be the viable option.

WCZ

7,346 posts

142 months

Monday 2nd December
quotequote all
I'd go C8, looks more intresting than the R8

as mentioned before it might be worth waiting until after brexit to see how the supercar market collapses then get a deal

ZeroGroundZero

Original Poster:

54 posts

2 months

Monday 2nd December
quotequote all
Trev450 said:
For me its all about ROI. If the return I'm getting on my investments is greater than the cost of borrowing the funds, then clearly the loan route is the obvious choice. If the money borrowed exceeds the ROI you're getting on your own funds and you can afford to spend it, then that has to be the viable option.
ROI involves a crystal ball to see the future wink

Was hoping there may be a magic formula, or a "tipping point" whereby one route is seen as the default '"no brainer" option.


May sound like a strange question, but I've never bought a car on any type of finance, always bought with cash or bank transfer, the full amount.
But this has always been on 2nd hand car values below £25k.

Spending £50k is kind of making me feel a bit itchy, having no 1st hand experience of the finance option in which to make a direct comparison in terms of risk (and sanity of course) smile

davek_964

6,187 posts

123 months

Monday 2nd December
quotequote all
For me, it's cash only. I'm sure there are financial reasons for not doing it that way - but if I suddenly found myself out of a job tomorrow I'd want my monthly outgoings to be as small as possible.
I am aware that I could liquidate the investments I still had because I financed the car etc. etc. - but I still wouldn't feel comfortable with the increased outgoings.

Not to mention the fact that my car probably craps value faster than I could pay it off with finance anyway.

Pioneer

898 posts

79 months

Monday 2nd December
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If you're not worried about the £££ then cash. You can enjoy your car a lot more knowing you own it outright. Especially if in your mind you've written that money off already

Kevin-sz0nv

235 posts

54 months

Monday 2nd December
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I listen to all the Brexit talk and how Supercars have peaked and are now taking a dip etc. I agree re prices have definitely reduced but I will still stick with my crystal ball forecast that a manual MK1 Audi R8 V10 with low mileage in good condition will be one of the safest places to invest your cash. A naturally aspirated V10 manual transmission will soon be a thing of the past and that alone gives it classic status. Time will tell but when cars are all electric autos the sound of that engine and feel of that 6 speed box will be much saught after so nows actually a great time to buy one!

ZeroGroundZero

Original Poster:

54 posts

2 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
That is a strong point.
But there are so many different angles you can look at it.

If for example a labour government got to power and their mission to wage war on the motorist takes full effect, they have proposals to remove 30% of cars from the road. Depending on how they'd go about this it could have huge impacts on car ownership choices and the simple affordability of car ownership in the first place. The market would likely crash as older cars could be banned from public roads. (We are seeing already with left/green leaning councils that they are banning cars from town centres and even proposals to ban them from tourist hotspots etc. - the progression of this is to ban vehicles on more and more stretches of roads or what they would likely deem 'environmentally sensitive' areas).

On a brighter note Corbyn will never take power, and if interest rates stay minimal, this means leasing will continue to be strong which forces up new car prices and tugs along the 2nd hand price market with it.

One question about the future of an Audi R8 V10 manual - everything considered, would the sheer number of production models be that they will struggle to retain value, or I am worrying too much?
(I plan to keep hold of the car for a good few years. I'm in my late 30's now, so hoping to keep hold of it for at least 10 years - or until the C8 is something I just can't ignore) wink


blueg33

22,135 posts

172 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
ZeroGroundZero said:
I think this next question from me is more for a finance thread, but say if you comfortably had the money in the bank, is it generally 'better', 'safer', more financially sound...to buy a £50k car outright, or to finance it over a few years?


I know for a NEW car purchase whereby depreciation over the first few years is severe, the answer would always be to lease the car, then hand it back.

But for 2nd hand cars which have seen the bulk of depreciation, is there an obvious winner over buying the car outright in one transaction, or to buy the car by form of certain percentage deposit and the rest being a loan/finance term repayment?
I am on my second Lotus Evora, they have both done well in terms of depreciation. I put 50k miles on the first one in 2 years and lost about £4k in depreciation, I have put about 20k miles in 3 years on the second and its still worth more or less what I paid.

Pioneer

898 posts

79 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
ZeroGroundZero said:
One question about the future of an Audi R8 V10 manual - everything considered, would the sheer number of production models be that they will struggle to retain value, or I am worrying too much?
It's never going to hold it's value like a sc. If this is on your mind, you won't enjoy owning the car as much. You'll be thinking about depreciation and running costs instead. It won't be too long before these are just old sports car with a nice soundtrack. And that soundtrack won't appeal to the next gen. of car buyers. Older buyers like myself will have fond memories of a V10 screeching out behind you but they'll seem very dated and expensive to run compared to the latest ev from Audi.

davek_964

6,187 posts

123 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
Pioneer said:
ZeroGroundZero said:
One question about the future of an Audi R8 V10 manual - everything considered, would the sheer number of production models be that they will struggle to retain value, or I am worrying too much?
It's never going to hold it's value like a sc. If this is on your mind, you won't enjoy owning the car as much. You'll be thinking about depreciation and running costs instead. It won't be too long before these are just old sports car with a nice soundtrack. And that soundtrack won't appeal to the next gen. of car buyers. Older buyers like myself will have fond memories of a V10 screeching out behind you but they'll seem very dated and expensive to run compared to the latest ev from Audi.
+1.

Assume the car will be worthless from the point you buy it. It almost certainly won't be - but it's very hard to predict depreciation, and with the whole EV thing and Greta the Great - it's anybody's guess these days. Just buy it and enjoy it.

Superleg48

754 posts

81 months

Tuesday
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blueg33 said:
I am on my second Lotus Evora, they have both done well in terms of depreciation. I put 50k miles on the first one in 2 years and lost about £4k in depreciation, I have put about 20k miles in 3 years on the second and its still worth more or less what I paid.
Would you mind sharing specifically which variant of Evora has performed like this? Been keeping half an eye on these, in particular GT410 Sport.

blueg33

22,135 posts

172 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
Superleg48 said:
blueg33 said:
I am on my second Lotus Evora, they have both done well in terms of depreciation. I put 50k miles on the first one in 2 years and lost about £4k in depreciation, I have put about 20k miles in 3 years on the second and its still worth more or less what I paid.
Would you mind sharing specifically which variant of Evora has performed like this? Been keeping half an eye on these, in particular GT410 Sport.
I have a 2014 S Sports Racer in the rather rare and many say lovely Daytona Blue. The colour helps. I think the GT410 probably has some depreciation to do. Evoras seem to have levels that they rarely go below eg

Super charged Sports Racers £38-42k
Pre 2012 cars circa £28 for n/a and £33 for S
400's £50-56k

The Lotus Forums has a thread called market watch

In terms of my car, I have been offered what I paid. I get at least one unsolicited offer every couple of months.




Superleg48

754 posts

81 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
blueg33 said:
I have a 2014 S Sports Racer in the rather rare and many say lovely Daytona Blue. The colour helps. I think the GT410 probably has some depreciation to do. Evoras seem to have levels that they rarely go below eg

Super charged Sports Racers £38-42k
Pre 2012 cars circa £28 for n/a and £33 for S
400's £50-56k

The Lotus Forums has a thread called market watch

In terms of my car, I have been offered what I paid. I get at least one unsolicited offer every couple of months.

Thank you. That is an outstanding colour and really suits the car.

vanman1936

332 posts

167 months

Tuesday
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Lovely looking lotus, i hear they are hard to sell on....doesn’t sound like your experience?

blueg33

22,135 posts

172 months

Tuesday
quotequote all
vanman1936 said:
Lovely looking lotus, i hear they are hard to sell on....doesn’t sound like your experience?
The market is smaller than say for a Porsche mainly because Lotus marketing is crap and people don’t know much about them. There are a few in unusual colours like mine and they seem to sell ok. But any niche sports car can be slow to sell.

sonicbloo

556 posts

98 months

Tuesday
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ZeroGroundZero said:
........... so hoping to keep hold of it for at least 10 years - or until the C8 is something I just can't ignore) wink
but in 10 years the C8 will have been superceded by the C9, and then C10 (no doubt electric powered) which will make the C8 just an old out -dated Corvette smile