Audi S6 engine failure

Audi S6 engine failure

Author
Discussion

Fermit and Sexy Sarah

8,697 posts

61 months

Thursday 12th November 2020
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mickyh7 said:
wave_watcher said:
Well, maybe I’m stupid for paying £6k. Difficult to imagine any refund coming our way in the event the fuel injectors are tested and found to be ok.... ??
Not stupid at all.
Agreed, in the dark is more apt. If my central heating wouldn't turn on and I called a plumber, I'd have no knowledge to call him out if he said the boiler was borked.

Gnevans

65 posts

83 months

Thursday 12th November 2020
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Not sure if this has been posted it may help.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/advice/honest-joh...

The result:

My 2016 Audi A6 Allroad quattro 3.0 V6 diesel had a catastrophic engine seizure on a motorway. It was purchased at seven months old from a main dealer, is still less than four years old and has now done 33,000 miles. The original manufacturer warranty expired 11 months ago and it has been serviced as scheduled by Audi. My dealer and Audi UK are proposing £16,000 to replace the engine and suggested that a very expensive strip-down could be done, at my expense, that might identify component failure. What should I do? AW

The V6 TDI in the Audi A6 has a history of timing chain and camshaft problems, of which I have a list. It has also been subject to recall by the German KBA for excessive NOx emissions. It is outrageous that, after the failure of this engine with a known problem, Audi should seek money from you to investigate; worse still that you should be quoted £16,000 for a new engine. Assuming you have done nothing wrong, such as failed to have the car serviced on time, or let it run short of oil, or put petrol in its fuel tank instead of diesel, I suggest you get a specialist solicitor onto this. Furnish him with the list of known failures (I supplied this to AW). And under the Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994, the case law of Clegg v Olle Andersson (Trading as Nordic Marine) House of Lords 2003 and under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, demand that Audi replaces the engine to your entire satisfaction free of charge and also refunds your legal expenses. (AW followed my advice and Audi UK funded the cost of the new engine, though not fitting. Evidence was then found that the engine had been worked on previously – perhaps during the Audi NOx emissions recall – so I recommended AW should take this up with the supplying dealer.)

wave_watcher

Original Poster:

32 posts

3 months

Thursday 12th November 2020
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Just very quickly as I’m in the dealership now.... only one oil screen being shown to us. Is there just one?

ritch

264 posts

148 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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any update?

wave_watcher

Original Poster:

32 posts

3 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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Car was delivered back to us last Monday night (9th November). It had been at the dealership since 24th September. I've got 8 fuel injectors and the spark plugs (which are only 10 months old ...I'm sobbing now)! For peace of mind, I dropped the car into the well respected independent Audi garage (Swift Motor Engineering) two days later. They hooked the Audi computer up. No faults showing. They studied the print out of the original diagnostic test done back on 28th September. Swift were interested in the fault 'System too Rich'. Also there is a strong smell of petrol in the oil. I gather this is interesting if it continues... The car is running fine, but Swift want to re-run the diagnostics next week after the car has had a few long runs. They told me to watch out for engine management warning. Wish I'd had one of those messages on 23rd September before the car had its' nervous breakdown!!
Finally, I ventured under the bonnet for a look, and I was frustrated to see that the two ends of the rectangular air intake pipe weren't locked together. I've tried, but can't manipulate them together myself, so I'll have to go back to get that fixed.
Anyone want to buy the car??? Audi say it's a great car now, but I have lost confidence in the brand, big time.... (more sobbing)

stevieturbo

15,152 posts

208 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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If Audi say it's a great car now, they should offer you a great price.

And given the scenario...no excuse at all for them not re-assembling everything correctly. Other than the usual dealer incompetence.

stevekoz

260 posts

123 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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Totally agree with the above. If its such a "great" car now then they should have no problem offering you a top market value for it. If not, it certainly shows their colours.

I can't say I'm unbias. I've had two audis and both had engine failures. They simply are, in my opinion, garbage trading on an elite badge.

That aside. I would start looking at legal information. It sounds like there are enough vagueness and misinformation from the dealer to at least attempt a legal approach.

For one, as far as i read, you told them the car was recovered to them i disnt read i you authorised anything more than diagnosis? Or was the original engine out done before you'd evev had the chance to understand the garbage that was coming out of their mouth?

There is prescedent for this. There was a case (I'll try and find the link) of a main dealer having a car in for diagnosis and a number of parts unrelated to the original request were removed and replaced without authority from the owner. On finding out the owner (who happened to be a solicitor) requested, as you seemed to do, to see said parts and have them returned. They refused, stating disposal. He made a case to say they were technically not part of the job order and therefore subject to removal without permission ie. theft. The dealer could return them and guarantee the vehicles condition or cover the cost themselves. There was a big thing about it a few years ago I remember reading.

Anyway. All that aside, sounds like it's worth gathering your evidence. Times, dates, conversations, texts, emails etc. Put them in a detailed account of whats happened. Send the letter very politely worded, to Audi UK HQ recorded delivery for attn Markus Fuesmanm (uk ceo as of May 2020 i think). State you wish to have their comments on the servive you Recieved, and request a refund, in addition state you will be seeking legal advice as you feel your treatment was above board. Also state any conversation herefrom should not include audi tyneside as you've lost all trust and confidence in them. I would also send the same letter to his email address Markus.Duesmann@audi.de or andrew.doyle@audi.co.uk
It should reach high enough up that someome will acknowledge and deal with it.

The outcome - probably very little bit it'll aure annoy the CeO's assistant enough to cause audi tyneside a headache and if luck shines on you. You may even get a response.

Sorry to hear your woes and sorry for the lengthy response.

F20CN16

8,075 posts

159 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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Not surprised you’ve fallen out of love with it after all this. I gave up on the VW group after one of their engines shat itself on me. Overrated crap.

stevieturbo

15,152 posts

208 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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Again, the priority for taking any action, is the injector test.

This is allegedly what they said failed and prevented the engine running, and arguably the bulk of the expense in both parts and labour as they removed the engine for this.

If these test out ok....the dealer has some very serious questions to answer. And really they should have been tested prior to replacement regardless given the expense.