DB9 Intake Manifold Removal

DB9 Intake Manifold Removal

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Discussion

old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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So working my way in to replace plugs and coils. Just got my first manifold off tonight. Heard the back bolt was a bugger. Had to remove access panel by the wipers and then use a long extension with one of those knuckle adapters to get the proper angle.







When I pulled off the throttle body there was a pool of oil in the manifold behind it. What would cause this?


One last thing. One of the intak bolts was coated with some type of corrosion. Anything to worry about?



Edited by old phart on Sunday 31st January 05:44

SLacKer

2,605 posts

169 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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When I had my coil packs done I had the complete PCV system replaced at the same time on recommendation from the specialist who did the work. I believe the PCV system diminishes in effectiveness over time and can be a cause of oil in the intake manifold.

Maybe you should direct your question to Bamford Rose on their sticky thread about the oil and possible causes. I have an invoice with all the part numbers for the PCV parts replaced. When I ordered them from HWM I explained that I needed the PCV to be refreshed and Robert @HWM filled in the details as he was aware of what I meant so clearly had dealt with this before.



the first two are the manifold and coil packs.

Also found this post which has a lot of information regarding the oil issue.

Edited by SLacKer on Sunday 31st January 11:29

Sump

5,465 posts

129 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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Did you need a special tool to disconnect the fuel line?

Organeer

16 posts

62 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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Hi OP,
Congratulations on your bravery. In fairness it is still just a collection of nuts and bolts, albeit some rather awkward ones.
Re the corrosion on the bolt. Was it the rearmost one under the scuttle? It looks like you have some corrosion at that panel and probably have some water ingress. I applied a non-setting gasket sealant on assembly.
The oil in your throttle bodies is most likely due to the PCV valves which seem prone to failure. Have you considered an oil catch tank?
When you are reassembling the fuel lines onto the injectors be careful not to dislodge the rearmost injector while fiddling the pipe into position. The reason I say this is that I dropped the back injector down the back of the engine and only barely managed to get it out with a flexi magnet. I really didn't want to take it apart again.
By the way have you stuffed some clean rags into the inlet inlet ports to stop any crud getting into them while you are cleaning the surfaces?

Edited by Organeer on Sunday 31st January 21:50

Organeer

16 posts

62 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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In reply to Sump,
It is not really necessary to disconnect the fuel rails but if you do wish to disconnect them then a special tool is highly recommended in order not to damage the seals.
There is a video on Youtube showing a fellow disconnecting a fuel filter with a similar connector using the cap from a "Sharpie" cut to size and split along its length to force back the clips.
Hope this helps.

old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Sunday 31st January 2016
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Thanks Organeer

I didn't disconnect the fuel rails. Just pushed to side. And as soon as I pulled the manifold I shoved towels in the intakes. Probably not 'doing it by the book' but am enjoying the process.
Yes the bolt with the corrosion was 2nd to the last. I think it is when I wash the car the water that gets through the vents on the bonnet collects.

Sump

5,465 posts

129 months

Monday 1st February 2016
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The reason I bring it up is that the manual says to disconnect the fuel rail but this isn't necessary then?




old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Monday 1st February 2016
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There was enough slack that I could just hold them to one side to get the manifold out. Once the first is out there is a lot more room for pulling the second.

Wondering is there a way to test the coil packs? I'm afraid they'll all look fine visually.
I'm replacing them all but would feel better knowing which one was bad.

Edited by old phart on Monday 1st February 14:21

SLacKer

2,605 posts

169 months

Monday 1st February 2016
quotequote all
Sump said:
The reason I bring it up is that the manual says to disconnect the fuel rail but this isn't necessary then?

How about this



Just search for 'Fuel Line Disconnect Tool Set' on Amazon or Google

The Red and Blue look like a good bet.


Edited by SLacKer on Monday 1st February 08:30

8Tech

1,936 posts

160 months

Thursday 4th February 2016
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Do you have anymore progress reports or pics to share? I was most interested in seeing whether you found anything wrong with those breather valves or whether the oil contamination was at a normal level.
Did you find any resistance values to check your coils primary resistance? Maybe if you cannot find the spec that they should be, at least testing them all may show one with a very different reading to the others?

8Tech

1,936 posts

160 months

Wednesday 10th February 2016
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Any updates on this old phart?

old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Sunday 21st February 2016
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So pulled coils and plugs. From plugs #10 is the only one significantly different/darker than the others as far as coloring.

Looking for a way to test coils to confirm. With my ohm meter I only get a reading across pins 1 and 2 and it is within .1 ohm between all coils.
Any other measurements I can take? Would you agree on the plug coloring or is it insignificant? Really was hoping to see/measure something that would indicate the proper cylinder.
Will be replacing PVC valves as well.

8Tech

1,936 posts

160 months

Sunday 21st February 2016
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I agree with your diagnosis on plug 10 but plug 7 does not look good either. Both look overfuelled/under-fired, so unless you can determine a way of testing the coils, I would be changing those 2. Whilst apart, you could do a comparitive compression test too.
Clearly, the injectors could be overfuelling, and it's too much bloody work to swap coils and injectors about to see where the missfire/fouled plugs swap cylinders to.
I suppose a dealer would just replace the whole lot to be safe, but thats overkill if you can run a diagnostic test on the coils, and maybe get the injectors tested and cleaned by a specialist.

How many pins do you have on your coils?

Keep the reports coming please.

SS972

585 posts

145 months

Sunday 21st February 2016
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When I did mine I knew wich coil was defective as I have access to an AMDS but went for the full coil pack as the time involved is not woth taking the risk of only changing one.
I also changed the gaskets around the plug wells as I had oil ingresion on two plug wells.
After changing the coils you need to do a "misfire correction relearn" with the AMDS.


You will have to relearn the misfire factors while monitoring the pids in datalogger...engine needs to be 90C or above...keep vehicle in "D" with A/C off and Sport Mode off...on a wide open stretch with no traffic, get up to 110kph and wait for 6th gear to select, release throttle and do not touch brake pedal, steering must be straight and coast till 56kph, now drive back up to 110kph and repeat the coast down till 56kph...look at the datalogger pid 36-1 and see if it has changed color to red...if it has not, repeat the drive cycle again from 110kph back down to 56kph...usually takes me 2-3 tries for the PCM to learn the New misfire factors.....without this learnt, the PCM will not detect a misfire and will run poorly



Edited by SS972 on Sunday 21st February 11:32

old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
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Done!

Replaced plugs and coils and put it all back together. What fun. When I fired it up there were 4 codes that popped up. One telling me it was cylinder 5. Good to know. So I've got 11 2009 DB9 3 pin coils if anyone is interested.

Anyway, I cleared the codes and took it out and did the 70mph to 20mph thing a few times but the codes kept coming back. My mirrors hadn't ever swung out to their service position and I got to thinking. Even though I had it on my official Aston trickle charger the whole time it might be a weak battery. I've read enough posts to know that the battery can cause all kinds of issues. I was still running on the original one so ran out and purchased a new one and Poof, all my issues went away. Only one left was a mass air flow fault and only because I had forgotten to plug it in.

I've had the car since February of last year and there must have always been a miss or something because it runs so smooooth now. No vibration of any kind.

When I first purchased the car and opened the hood I was awestruck with the manifolds and always thought they'd look awesome polished up.

Sooooooo




mrpseudonym

220 posts

78 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
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Which OBD reader do you use to read and clear codes?

paulrog1

675 posts

103 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
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Well done!! those inlet manifolds look ace!!!

How did you sort out the oil breather system fault?

Paul.

8Tech

1,936 posts

160 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
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Manifolds look good and would have been a lot of work considering the original cast finish. Good to see AM used good quality alloy when casting them otherwise polishing would have left them patchy.

Seems a shame to have to refit the strut braces and cover them.

I assume you ended up replacing the breather system with new valves etc rather than try and modify?

old phart

Original Poster:

396 posts

72 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
quotequote all
Only replaced plugs, coils, PCV's, and battery. All the codes are now gone so I assume any not directly related to the original misfire were battery related.

as to the oil in the intakes - I spoke with an Aston mechanic and he said not to worry too much about it. He said if you keep your oil topped off you actually increase it a bit. Said he's recommend not keeping oil level to the very top of the mark on the dip stick. Aim for the middle of the marker.

Here's a shot of my OBD reader I used. It connects to my phone via bluetooth.

Quick shout out to forum members in that I knew to reset my windows and seats after replacing the battery, and even to the fact about knowing a weak battery can cause false faults. Only hope I'm doing my part to contribute to the knowledge base.




Edited by old phart on Sunday 3rd April 16:40


Edited by old phart on Sunday 3rd April 20:59

Ken Figenus

4,925 posts

79 months

Sunday 3rd April 2016
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I made a funny little noise when I saw that inlet manifold, but have assured my missus I'm actually OK! Lovely job and thanks for sharing the info. How many hours did it take you as I am SO keen to do the plugs myself one day - have always done plugs and much more on everything!