New BMW's getting stolen using blank BMW keys

New BMW's getting stolen using blank BMW keys

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Discussion

p1stonhead

25,040 posts

133 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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Eddieslofart said:
p1stonhead said:
At least the car isnt gone and its prob 'only' £4k to put it all back. Still st though.
Was a story of this happenning to an M5. 14k to fix, as loom was cut.
Probably a write off in a lot of cars. Presumably not an M5 at least.

I have an F33 and to be honest whilst I live in a safe area I guess that doesn’t mean much at all.

On the flip side, I honestly can’t be arsed with any sort of disc lock or anything....

Without comfort access is this harder to pull off? It’s still keyless as I think most are but I still need to press my fob to get in.

Ructions

4,596 posts

87 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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Eddieslofart said:
Was a story of this happenning to an M5. 14k to fix, as loom was cut.
I’d be repairing the loom, 14k is madness for a loom. It’s also madness that modern car security is so poor.

AW10

3,811 posts

215 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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Ructions said:
It’s also madness that modern car security is so poor.
Agreed - Thatcham approval is somewhat analogous to emissions and fuel economy testing - it seems to have limited relevance to real world conditions.

Sardonicus

17,901 posts

187 months

Wednesday 31st October 2018
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Ructions said:
I’d be repairing the loom, 14k is madness for a loom. It’s also madness that modern car security is so poor.
BMW wont repair a loom in any shape or form even the easiest documented E61 5 series tailgate wiring loom breaking issue , well a few well known dealers to me anyway rolleyes I am not complaining however someone as to do it laugh

Super_G

852 posts

64 months

Saturday 13th February
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Howdy. Rather than starting a whole new thread. If anyone can answer my questions.

1. Was the key scanning issue resolved on the F3X LCI models? In other words, does the key switch off if not moved?
2. Have there been any G20 thefts?

Thanks

ukpolak

52 posts

5 months

Saturday 13th February
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I can’t answer the question directly but there must be two access methods - one using the coding of a blank key, and another using a relay to mimic / amplify the OEM key to get in the car.

I’d understood one of the methods was reliant on the “comfort access” option or package where you don’t have to actually press the key, and as long as it is “on your person” then you can enter the car. So a lot of forums recommend not speccing that option.

Mitigants advised to me:
1. Use a crook lock steering wheel lock - I use this daily and have for 4 years. Dearer cars park next to me etc but at least it puts of anyone wanting to have a go.
2. Blocking the OBD port. I haven’t done but need to somehow “. Apparently vibration activated car alarms or what not atr quickly deactivated by coding via the port Upton breaking in, so locking it closed or covering it increases the chances of unsuccessful theft or the alarm from sounding.

I haven’t read as much about thefts like this for a while now.

Krikkit

21,414 posts

147 months

Saturday 13th February
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Anecdotally the remote boosting of "comfort access" type keyless are the current methods. Some family of mine have had other cars get nicked this way from their neighbours (an Alfa Stelvio, Audi S3, Fiesta ST) and have now taken to storing their keys in Faraday pouches etc.

ashenfie

252 posts

12 months

Sunday 14th February
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ukpolak said:
I can’t answer the question directly but there must be two access methods - one using the coding of a blank key, and another using a relay to mimic / amplify the OEM key to get in the car.

I’d understood one of the methods was reliant on the “comfort access” option or package where you don’t have to actually press the key, and as long as it is “on your person” then you can enter the car. So a lot of forums recommend not speccing that option.

Mitigants advised to me:
1. Use a crook lock steering wheel lock - I use this daily and have for 4 years. Dearer cars park next to me etc but at least it puts of anyone wanting to have a go.
2. Blocking the OBD port. I haven’t done but need to somehow “. Apparently vibration activated car alarms or what not atr quickly deactivated by coding via the port Upton breaking in, so locking it closed or covering it increases the chances of unsuccessful theft or the alarm from sounding.

I haven’t read as much about thefts like this for a while now.
Depending on year of your car, things are a lot better as incremental improvements have been made. No longer can you simply introduce a key or make a key via the obd. This has been blocked. The newest keys don't transmit unless they are moving and therefore your can't be signal boosted to gain entry. Advice would be keep keys away from doors and windows.

Leaves us with the simplest option of stealing the keys from the house and driving off or simply towing away your car and bypassing the security later.

I have no idea about the mobile phone entry systems.

Hugo Stiglitz

31,098 posts

177 months

Sunday 7th March
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So does storing keys in a Faraday wallet and biscuit Tim at home a good idea or does the method circumvent that anyway?

BrownBottle

1,305 posts

102 months

Sunday 7th March
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Not knocking anyone who uses them but I really couldn't be doing with faffing about with a steering lock every time I got in my car.

Last time I used one was over 2 decades ago in my cavalier Sri 130... it's weird seeing them in cars in this day and age.

Tea Pot One

1,777 posts

194 months

Sunday 7th March
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BrownBottle said:
Not knocking anyone who uses them but I really couldn't be doing with faffing about with a steering lock every time I got in my car.

Last time I used one was over 2 decades ago in my cavalier Sri 130... it's weird seeing them in cars in this day and age.
I use one on my X3 M40i and tbh the Stoplock one is a few seconds. The Discklok is a pita and I stopped using it ...

nomis36

285 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March
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BrownBottle said:
Not knocking anyone who uses them but I really couldn't be doing with faffing about with a steering lock every time I got in my car.

Last time I used one was over 2 decades ago in my cavalier Sri 130... it's weird seeing them in cars in this day and age.
I was with you.........until my E36 M3 got stolen nearly 4 years ago. The E92 330d I replaced it with is obviously nowhere near as nickable but once bitten twice shy and all that so I use a disklok where I park it at night outside my flat which is where the M3 was stolen from. It’s only a 5 second faff to be honest so worth it for a bit more piece of mind.
I just kick myself when I think about it that I didn’t have one for the M3, much regret. frown

nomis36

285 posts

130 months

Sunday 7th March
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Tea Pot One said:
I use one on my X3 M40i and tbh the Stoplock one is a few seconds. The Discklok is a pita and I stopped using it ...
The disklok is a pita but is the only one they reckon that’s worth a toss. Stoplocks are overcome easily but sawing through the very thin metal ring of the steering wheel then bending it slightly to slip the lock off. Seen it done in seconds. Having said that, any deterrent is better than no deterrent.

AW10

3,811 posts

215 months

Monday 8th March
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Hugo Stiglitz said:
So does storing keys in a Faraday wallet and biscuit Tim at home a good idea or does the method circumvent that anyway?
The Faraday pouch is enough; a biscuit tin as well is OTT. And a biscuit tin alone is probably not enough - if in doubt try it and see.

dasbimmerowner

246 posts

107 months

Monday 8th March
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I use a disclok on my 340i, there's plenty of other reasonably quick-ish/expensive cars on the estate I live on so my thinking is simply to make it harder to nick than those and thus far I've had no issues (touch wood!).

Ructions

4,596 posts

87 months

Monday 8th March
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AW10 said:
Hugo Stiglitz said:
So does storing keys in a Faraday wallet and biscuit Tim at home a good idea or does the method circumvent that anyway?
The Faraday pouch is enough; a biscuit tin as well is OTT. And a biscuit tin alone is probably not enough - if in doubt try it and see.
Faraday pouches don’t seem to last, at least the couple that I’ve had didn’t. I still use a small biscuit tin, leave it beside the bed.

I have tested the tin beside the car and it would not open, with the pouch it did.

Hugo Stiglitz

31,098 posts

177 months

Monday 8th March
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Any experience with this? Otherwise I'll get some biscuits munched in prep...

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Small-Faraday-Signal-Bloc...

Chebble

1,691 posts

118 months

Monday 8th March
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Hugo Stiglitz said:
Any experience with this? Otherwise I'll get some biscuits munched in prep...

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Small-Faraday-Signal-Bloc...
Based on this:

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.autoexpress.co....

I bought these:

Defender RFID Signal Blocking Pouch - Phone Case Signal Blocking Device - Car Key Signal Blocker Pouch Security Case - Signal Blocking Wallet For Car Keys Mobile Phone Cards (2 x Pack, Black) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07B3R5FLG/ref=cm_sw_r...

Make sure you put the fob in the correct part of the pouch. Won’t start the car, even when you’re sat in the car with the pouch (and fob) sat in the centre console. 2019 Fiesta ST for what it’s worth.

Obviously, make sure the spare is also kept in the pouch!