Althea and Ducati split....

Althea and Ducati split....

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Turn7

Original Poster:

20,397 posts

190 months

Saturday 27th October 2012
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From GPOne via Google translate :

It 's the divorce of the year but, on reflection, it was inevitable that Ducati Althea were allowed. The scriocchiolii you felt the summer and the strange thing, if anything, is that the rupture occurred only now, at the end of October, after the team had already begun in preparation for the test of Aragon World 2013.

The agreement Althea Ducati-2012 had been born in the mess of Portimao 2011 when Carlos Checa, just graduated World Champion, was a step away from sensational move to BMW. To avoid the mockery Ducati, who a few days later, he launched Panigale, was forced to accept the halter posed by Checa (€ 800,000 of engagement more prizes) and the team. That, in addition to the supply of bikes, Ducati Corse has received from the coverage of most of the 2012 budget. Ducati has also paid the revision of the engines and of course the salary of some technical racing department posted in the internal structure of the satellite.

Ducati in 2012 then spent more or less what it would cost to deploy an internal team. With a much lower visibility because, in fact, the company's most successful Superbike had no promotional presence in the paddock, unlike competitors.

But it is not so obvious that the divorce was caused only by economic reasons. Ducati wanted a more visible, starting with the name of the team. And probably in Bologna also sought a reduction in the role of Genesio Bevilacqua, the owner of Althea in the last two years has spoken as if it were - in fact - the spokesperson, rather than solely on his team.

Now we're curious to see what happens. Carlos Checa has renewed directly with Ducati Corse, Davide Giugliano and Althea instead is under contract so it's in limbo, as the team. The bikes "customers" abound: the fourth Aprilia RSV4 is available to offer favorable conditions and four 2012 Bmw official version, that is the whole technical equipment BMW Motorrad and BMW Italy. But organize everything from scratch, or nearly so, a few weeks away from world champion (February 24, 2013 in Phillip Island) will not be a joke.

And the Ducati? Ernesto Marinelli, who in addition to being responsible and also responsible for the technical management commitment SBK, has hinted that they are in negotiations with other satellite. But there does not seem a difficult to implement, given the short time available, and also full of pitfalls: techniques, because the Panigale is booming and in need of a reliable, proven, and even image. Checa also, presumably, will not agree to go for a run with a team that not only understands.

So, since the budget is more or less the same as it would be necessary to continue with Althea Ducati Corse end that will be "forced" on track with the internal team. How wwwgpone.com had feared last June 8. But there is more: it is an ongoing negotiation with David Tardozzi that, after the stormy experience in BMW, may return as head of the structure of Borgo Panigale Superbike. A role he held from 1998 to 2010 winning 18 world titles pilots and manufacturers.

Ducati that there needs to be a deep riorgarnizzazione is obvious: the end of October there is still the World team and has not even been formal agreement with the only satellite team that has shown interest in the Panigale for German Max Neukirchner. Furthermore, Ducati has disappeared from the uptown BSB and other top national championships. Need refound. Tardozzi know how.


LoonR1

26,988 posts

146 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Google translate? That's more or less unintelligible.

gimmeshelter

100 posts

149 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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No more Up Town Top Ranking?

s3fella

10,523 posts

156 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Clearly written by a 419er.

FourWheelDrift

82,770 posts

253 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Here's a version not needing translation.

Crash.net said:
Althea Racing and Ducati have reportedly ended their World Superbike collaboration, raising question marks with regards to the manufacturer's future direction in the series.

Revealed by Italian publication Moto.it and seemingly confirmed by Althea boss Genesio Bevilacqua and Ducati's Ernesto Marinelli, the announcement comes as a shock given Althea recently gave the much vaunted Ducati 1199 Panigale its public test debut earlier in the month.

According to Bevilacqua, the reasons for the split are numerous, such as the economic commitment Ducati were willing to give Althea (having paid Carlos Checa's salary and introduced new sponsors in 2011), uncertainty over developing a new bike before new technical rules come in for 2014 and retaining the services of Davide Giugliano.

"We are used to doing things better,” he told Moto.it. “Since the beginning of our history in Superbike we carried out a successful project and we wanted to continue on the same road. Without the conditions to do so, we are not interested in continuing.

“The main reason for the disagreement is obviously on the economic side and has amazed us, especially the fact that a company like Ducati, recently taken over by a giant like Audi, has no interest in investing in a new product, on a project that would lead to repeat the successes of the past with the consequent benefits that would result in terms of sales.

“Just as had happened in 2012, we were ready to invest all our resources and to confirm our sponsors in the new project Panigale and it was obvious that we expected the same commitment even by Ducati.”

Despite the split, Marinelli insists the Ducati is prepared to continue in 2013, with Checa - but not Althea-contracted Giugliano - at the helm. However, the full structure is yet to be determined.

"We will run with Carlos and the Panigale to win, the non-renewal with Althea cannot hinder our goal in the coming days and notify programs Superbike final in a press release. In our history we have changed structures, shape and motion several times always getting good results and the common denominator has always been the Ducati. "

“I want to emphasise we are, and I in particular, very sorry for not being able to reach an agreement with the Althea team for 2013. My respect and gratitude along with that of Ducati as Genesio and his team have done over the years in which we worked together is total and will definitely remain unchanged, as will the friendship that binds me to him as well as to all boys of his team, with whom I had a great time in three years full of success. For Genesio and for all of them, the doors of the Ducati and will always remain open. "

Having started out with Honda machinery in 2008, Althea Racing made the switch to a pair of privateer Ducatis from 2010 and quickly emerged as race winners. When Ducati promptly withdrew its official factory presence, Althea assumed de facto factory status from 2011, with Checa romping to the title.

Since 2010, Althea has notched up 22 race wins with Checa, while Giugliano was also victorious in the 2011 FIM Superstock 1000 Cup. As it stands, it remains to be seen whether Althea will continue to compete in World Superbikes.

Shadow R1

3,679 posts

145 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Is the Panigale, that bad in wsb trim that teams don't want to run it ?
I can see Checa retiring, as whats the point of another year on a machine he cant win on.

Dare2Fail

3,808 posts

177 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Interesting. So Ducati spend a small fortune on Rossi in MotoGP and at the same time pull their official factory squad out of WSBK while stating that the cost of Rossi had no influence of the decision. Rossi leaves, thus saving them the king's ransom of a paycheque, and they suddenly find themselves with an official factory squad once again in WSBK. Maybe I am getting too cynical and suspicious in my old age.

s3fella

10,523 posts

156 months

Sunday 28th October 2012
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Rossi's always dragged the cash away from other formulas. Same at Yamaha who's wsbk efforts dwindled as they developed the moto gp bike for him and paid his wages.

I wonder if Ducati are wondering if it was all worth it?